Percutaneous Paddle Electrode

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IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129174D
Publication Date: 30-Sep-2005
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Abstract

A percutaneous lead that can be placed like a conventional percutaneous lead and functions more like a paddle lead is described herein. A paddle electrode/lead can be placed using a percutaneous procedure, instead of a more surgically invasive laminotomy or laminectomy.

Language

English (United States)

Country

United States

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6 pages / 57.7 KB

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Page 1 of 6

Percutaneous Paddle Electrode

Background

    There are two general types of implantable stimulating electrode leads that can be used for spinal cord stimulation: percutaneous and paddle leads (or sometimes referred to as electrodes). A percutaneous lead can have one or more electrode contacts on the distal area of the lead and usually has an isodiametric distal end, where "isodiametric" means the lead diameter is constant along the specified portion of the lead. Percutaneous leads are implanted into the spinal area using a relatively simple surgical technique similar to an epidural procedure. The spinal area does not need to be exposed during implantation of the percutaneous lead. Because the implantation is simple, a percutaneous lead can be implanted by anesthesiologists, as well as neurosurgeons and orthopedic surgeons.

    Paddle leads, also commonly referred to as surgical leads/electrodes, usually have a paddle-like surface at the distal end of the stimulating electrode lead. The paddle is usually an isolative substrate such as silicone or polyurethane, whereon one or more electrode contacts are placed on one major surface of the paddle. The electrode contacts may be arranged in columns. The columns may be staggered relative to each other, among other electrode contact arrangements.

    Unlike percutaneous leads, paddle leads do not have an isodiametric distal end. The paddle size is usually significantly larger than the diameter of the rest of the paddle lead. Because of the bulk of the paddle, the surgical procedure for implanting a paddle lead is much more complicated surgically. The implantation requires a laminectomy or a laminotomy. This procedure must be performed by a neurosurgeon or orthopedic surgeon, having surgical skills necessary to perform the more invasive surgical procedure.

    There are advantages and disadvantages to both types of leads/electrodes. Percutaneous leads/electrodes are easier to implant, however, the current delivered through and around the electrode(s) is omni-directional. Because of their slim, isodiametric profile, percutaneous leads may dislodge easily and, thus, they can have a high rate of migration from the original implant position.

    Paddle leads/electrodes are more difficult to implant, however, the current delivered through the electrode(s) on a paddle can be unidirectional, e.g., concentrated on one side of the paddle. In addition, the paddles, once implanted, are more positionally stable. It would be ideal if a paddle lead could be implanted percutaneously, yet deliver current like a paddle lead and be positionaly stable like a paddle lead.

Detailed Description

    A percutaneous lead that can be placed like a conventional percutaneous lead and functions more like a paddle lead is described herein. A paddle electrode/lead can be placed using a percutaneous procedure, instead of a more surgically invasive laminotomy or laminectomy. FIG. 1 shows a planar view of a percutaneous paddle electrode. As seen...

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