Architecture Alternatives for LTE Femto GW Integration into the Evolved Packet Core

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IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000173330D
Publication Date: 12-Aug-2008
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The IP.com Journal (v8n8A)

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Juergen Carstens - Contact
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Abstract

The LTE (Long Term Evolution) technology, which is currently under the standardization by 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP), will deliver ultra-broadband speeds and almost instantaneous responsiveness for multimedia applications. To take full advantage of these broadband access networks and to enable the co-existence of multiple technologies through an efficient, all-packet architecture, 3GPP is developing a new core network, the evolved packet core (EPC). The current EPC architecture is illustrated in Figure 1. The evolved packet system (EPS) comprises the EPC and a set of access systems such as the eUTRAN or UTRAN (eUTRAN: evolved UMTS Terrestrial Radio Access Network, UMTS: Universal Mobile Telecommunications System). EPS represents a migration from the traditional hierarchical system architecture to a flattened architecture that minimizes the number of hops and distributes the processing load across the network.

Copyright

Nokia Siemens Networks 2008

Language

English (United States)

Country

Finland

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5 pages / 133.3 KB

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Architecture Alternatives for LTE Femto GW Integration into the Evolved Packet Core

Idea: Ivan Ore, FI-Espoo; Joanna Jokinen, FI- Espoo; Tom Grahn, FI- Espoo; Jarmo Virtanen, FI-

Espoo

The LTE (Long Term Evolution) technology, which is currently under the standardization by 3rd

Generation Partnership Project (3GPP), will deliver ultra-broadband speeds and almost instantaneous

responsiveness for multimedia applications. To take full advantage of these broadband access

networks and to enable the co-existence of multiple technologies through an efficient, all-packet

architecture, 3GPP is developing a new core network, the evolved packet core (EPC). The current

EPC architecture is illustrated in Figure 1. The evolved packet system (EPS) comprises the EPC and a

set of access systems such as the eUTRAN or UTRAN (eUTRAN: evolved UMTS Terrestrial Radio

Access Network, UMTS: Universal Mobile Telecommunications System). EPS represents a migration

from the traditional hierarchical system architecture to a flattened architecture that minimizes the

number of hops and distributes the processing load across the network.

Furthermore, closed subscription groups (CSG) are introduced as a new concept in 3GPP cellular

networks where certain access nodes are restricted to a certain group of users. This restriction should

be taken into account in the UE (User's Equipment) mobility procedures in idle and dedicated mode.

The support of CSG adds requirements documented in TS 36.300 Annex F to UE, radio access

(eNodeB, HNB (HomeNodeB), etc) and the core network (EPC). Some of the CSG requirements

impacting the core network are:
1. Handling two kinds of multimedia identifiers (IDs): 1) Tracking area identifier and 2) CSG

network identifier. The CSG network identifier identifies the closed subscription group. A

collection of CSG network identifiers can be stored in UE memory on the whitelist. The UE

is only able to access the CSG networks that are registered in the UE whitelist. To support

a large number of CSG networks, for example home cells, the CSG network identifier may

be long (e.g. 30 bits).
2. Updates of the subscriber information (CSG membership class), which may be delivered

to eNodeB during the S1 establishment.
3. Updating in the NAS (Non-Access Stratum) signaling:
4. Mobility Management Entity (MME) informs the UE via NAS signaling whether the CSG

cell search can be done in the Tracking Area (TA).
5. Updating the CSG whitelist of the UEs (UE has to confirm the whitelist updating via NAS

signaling as well).
6. Handling the three lists: mobility, forbidden TAs and allowed CSG network IDs (whitelist).
7. Database for the mapping of the TA and the network ID (location).
8. Database for mapping CSG members and network ID.
9. The databases have to be updated in real time upon CSG owner request.

One of the most important CSG scenario...

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