Domino Web Access 7 Customization

An IBM Redpaper Publication
IBM Redbook Form Number: REDP-4188-00
Publication Date: 28-Aug-2006
Last Update Date: 31-Aug-2006
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Philip Monson - Author [+1] [-1]
Wolfgang Fey - Author

Abstract

Lotus Domino Web Access 7 gives users the power to create rich text messages, schedule meetings, manage tasks, and collaborate with colleagues, whether they are using their own workstation, an Internet kiosk, or another user's PC. Offline services for the security-rich e-mail, collaboration, and personal information management features of Domino Web Access allow a mobile workforce to maintain a high level of productivity by expanding access to key information and applications. This Redpaper will provide you with the guidance you need to determine where changes should be made in Domino Web Access to accomplish customizations relevant to your organizations needs.

Language

English

Table of Content

Chapter 1. Introduction to Lotus Domino Web Access Customization
Chapter 2. Customization Scenario - ITSO Bank
Chapter 3. Customization Considerations
Chapter 4. Skin Customization Techniques
Chapter 5. Feature Customization Techniques
Chapter 6. Administrative Customizations
Appendix A. Additional Customization Tips
Appendix B. Sneak Preview - upcoming features
Appendix C. Additional material
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Redpaper

Front cover
Domino Web Access 7
Customization
Philip Monson
Wolfgang Fey
Shu Sia Lukito
Purvi Trivedi
Integrate your organization’s design
into Domino Web Access
Extend and enhance Domino Web
Access functionality
Leverage new Version 7
design capabilities


International Technical Support Organization
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
August 2006

© Copyright International Business Machines Corporation 2006. All rights reserved.
Note to U.S. Government Users Restricted Rights -- Use, duplication or disclosure restricted by GSA ADP Schedule
Contract with IBM Corp.
First Edition (August 2006)
This edition applies to Version 6 and Version 7 of IBM Lotus Notes and Domino.
Note: Before using this information and the product it supports, read the information in “Notices” on
page vii.

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2006. All rights reserved.
iii
Contents
Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .vii
Trademarks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii
Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix
The team that wrote this Redpaper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix
Become a published author. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .x
Comments welcome. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .x
Chapter 1. Introduction to Lotus Domino Web Access customization . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
1.1 Domino Web Access defined . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1.1.1 Address Book and Journal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1.1.2 Domino Offline Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1.1.3 Heterogeneous environment support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1.2 The history of Domino Web Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
1.3 Why customize Domino Web Access. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
1.4 How customizable Domino Web Access is. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
1.4.1 Skin customization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
1.4.2 Feature customization. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
1.5 Upgrading a customized Domino Web Access environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
1.5.1 Use a custom forms file. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
1.5.2 Isolate your custom code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
1.5.3 Document your changes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
1.5.4 Other considerations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
1.6 Going offline with customized Domino Web Access. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
1.7 Browser considerations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
1.8 Language pack considerations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
1.9 IBM support policy for customized Domino Web Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Chapter 2. Customization scenario - ITSO Bank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
2.1 Corporate standard design customization. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
2.2 Mail management compliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
2.2.1 Custom dialog box creation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
2.2.2 Action menu operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
2.2.3 Application integration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
2.2.4 Further customization examples. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
2.3 Domino Offline Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Chapter 3. Customization considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
3.1 General customization considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
3.1.1 Domino Web Access Customization in Domino 6.5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
3.1.2 Custom_JS form. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
3.2 Domino Web Access architecture. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
3.2.1 Templates and forms files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
3.2.2 Special icon note items. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
3.3 Domino Web Access Web page generation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
3.3.1 Domino Web Access Web page architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
3.3.2 Domino Web Access Web page generation process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
3.3.3 Proxy documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
3.4 Domino Web Access Web pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

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3.4.1 Main pages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
3.4.2 Other pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
3.5 Domino Web Access scenes and subscenes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
3.5.1 Standard read and edit scenes and subscenes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
3.6 Domino Web Access skins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
3.6.1 Skin group. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
3.6.2 Skin type (skin). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
3.6.3 Which skin is used . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
3.6.4 Skin components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
3.7 Forms map table. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
3.8 Domino Web Access special Web page elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
3.8.1 Special server-side tags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
3.8.2 Extensible tags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
3.8.3 Special URL arguments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
3.8.4 Special Domino Web Access formulas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
3.9 Domino Web Access table of contents (TOC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
3.10 How to edit Domino Web Access Markup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
3.11 Taking customized Domino Web Access offline. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Chapter 4. Skin customization techniques. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
4.1 Skin customization overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
4.2 Modifying the stylesheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
4.2.1 Change the background of the top toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
4.2.2 Change background color of the left panel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
4.2.3 Change the background color of the view label . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
4.2.4 Change the color of the selected item in the outline. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
4.2.5 Change the highlight color in the outline. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
4.2.6 Change the of the Active, Inactive, and highlighted tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
4.2.7 Changing the background color for the table of contents toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
4.2.8 Change the background color for the action bar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
4.2.9 Change the background color of the column header . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
4.2.10 Change the menu highlight color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
4.2.11 Change the background color for the message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
4.3 Modifications to h_ShimmerSkin-h_ListFolder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
4.3.1 Change the background color around the arrow on the divider . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
4.3.2 Move search next to preferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
4.3.3 Remove trash icon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
4.4 Modifying forms and subforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
4.4.1 Change banner to company logo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
4.4.2 Change the About information box to display company logo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
4.4.3 Modifications to s_SessionInfo form. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
4.5 Adding a new skin component . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
4.6 Corporate Login screen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
4.6.1 Corporate logo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
4.6.2 Adding functionality to display weekday, date, and time. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Chapter 5. Feature customization techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
5.1 Implementation overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
5.2 Domino Web Access functions for Action menu operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
5.2.1 DM_getMenuByPos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
5.2.2 DM_getMenuById. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
5.2.3 DM_getMenuByLabel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
5.2.4 DM_removeMenu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67

Contents
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5.2.5 DM_newMenu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
5.2.6 DM_getParentNode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
5.2.7 DM_getChildNodes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
5.2.8 DM_updateActionBar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
5.2.9 DM_getSubmenuItem. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
5.2.10 DM_createContextMenu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
5.2.11 DM_getBranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
5.3 Overwrite New Message action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
5.3.1 Create a new dialog page. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
5.3.2 Modify Custom_JS form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
5.3.3 Modify s_MailMemoDictionary subform . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
5.3.4 Modify s_MailMemoEdit subform . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
5.4 Remove Action Tools → Block Mail from Sender. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
5.4.1 Add Action New → Account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
5.5 Add a new form, ccount . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
5.5.1 Create a new form in Designer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
5.5.2 Create document in Notes client. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
5.5.3 Add the FormsMap form to forms7.nsf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
5.5.4 Create the FormsMap mapping document . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
5.5.5 Special subforms for page creation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
5.5.6 Add the forms and subforms for the scene. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
5.5.7 Use the action New Account. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
5.5.8 Preferences. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Chapter 6. Administrative customizations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
6.1 Different customizations for different audiences. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
6.1.1 How to use different forms databases. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
6.2 notes.ini variables affecting Domino Web Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
6.2.1 Configuration settings versus notes.ini parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
6.2.2 Obsolete notes.ini variables in Domino Web Access 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
6.2.3 New or modified notes.ini variables in Notes and Domino 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
6.3 Domino Web Access redirect personal options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
6.3.1 Configuration document options. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
6.3.2 DWA redirect options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Appendix A. Additional customization tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Creating a custom help document in the Domino Web Access help database . . . . . . . . . 106
Different techniques to include externalized code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Tools helpful for Domino Web Access Development. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
NotesPeek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Firefox extensions and tools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
JavaScript debugger. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Internet Explorer tools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Additional tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Wrapper functions for action menu operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
removeActions function. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
addActions function. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Appendix B. Sneak preview: upcoming features. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
What is in Notes and Domino Version 7.0.2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
Appendix C. Additional material . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
Locating the Web material. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137

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Using the Web material . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
How to use the Web material . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
Related publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
IBM Redbooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
Online resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
How to get IBM Redbooks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
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vii
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viii
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
Trademarks
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© Copyright IBM Corp. 2006. All rights reserved.
ix
Preface
Domino® Web Access is a client that allows users to access different Domino services using
a Web browser. Domino Web Access provides the browser user with access to a number of
features that were previously only available for users with non-browser clients, such as
Lotus® Notes®.
As you read this IBM® Redpaper, you will discover that Domino Web Access is highly
customizable. Domino Web Access is categorized as a markup-based application. As a
markup-based application, the markup or script is the factor that defines the look, feel, and
function of the application. Therefore, if you know what to change, you can customize Domino
Web Access by modifying this markup or script. This Redpaper provides you with the
guidance that you need to determine where changes should be made in Domino Web Access
to accomplish the customization relevant to your organization’s needs. In this Redpaper we
use a fictitious financial institution called ITSO Bank to illustrate the customizations necessary
for their business needs.
The team that wrote this Redpaper
This Redpaper was produced by a team of specialists from around the world working at the
International Technical Support Organization, Cambridge, Massachusetts Center.
Philip Monson is a Project Leader at the ITSO Lotus Center in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
Phil has been with Lotus/IBM for 16 years, joining the company when the early versions of
Notes were rolled out for internal use. He has served in management, technical, and
consulting roles in the IT, Sales, and Development organizations.
Wolfgang Fey works for ebf-EDV Beratung Foellmer GmbH in Muenster, Germany
(http://www.ebf.de). He is a Lotus Certified Professional Administrator R5 and Domino 6.5
at the Principal level. He has more than 13 years of experience in solution design and
architecture, as well as in system consulting and integration and project management. He has
in-depth knowledge of the banking and insurance industries and in the operation of data
processing centers. He has successfully managed various projects in which he was involved
in the design and architecture of Lotus Notes/Domino infrastructure and the development of
several Notes/Domino applications for the Notes Client and the Domino Web interface as well
as customizations to Domino Web Access since Version 5.0.8. He was one of the IBM
Redbook authors of Domino Web Access 6.5 on Linux, SG24-7060.
Shu Sia Lukito is a Senior IT Specialist in the Washington, DC, metro area. She has over
nine years of industry-level experience in application design and development, specializing in
Lotus/Domino and WebSphere® Portal products. She has successfully designed and
developed applications for telecommunications, medical, and insurance companies. She has
been with IBM for six years. Her areas of expertise include Lotus Notes/Domino applications
(for Notes and Web clients), Domino Web Access, and WebSphere Portal theme
customization. She has written articles on Domino Web Access customization topics and
WebSphere Portal theme customization.
Purvi Trivedi is a Staff Software Engineer with the IBM Lotus Software Support team
working with PSP customers. She has been with IBM for three years and her areas of
expertise include Domino Web Access, Domino Offline Services, Domino Access For
Microsoft® Outlook®, Notes Client installation, and Notes Client Plug-in for WorkPlace Rich
Client. She holds a Bachelors degree in Computer Science from the University of

x
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
Massachusetts at Amherst and is currently pursuing a Masters degree in Software
Engineering at Brandeis University.
Thanks to the following people for their contributions to this project:
Vinod Seraphin, Senior Technical Staff Member, Domino Web Access Architect, IBM
Software Group, Lotus
John LeJeune, Domino Web Access Development, IBM Software Group, Lotus
John Immerman, Development Manager, IBM Software Group, Lotus
Jane L. Wilson, Knowledge System Architect. IBM Software Group, Lotus
Jason Dumont, Senior Product Manager, IBM Software Group, Lotus
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© Copyright IBM Corp. 2006. All rights reserved.
3
Chapter 1.
Introduction to Lotus Domino
Web Access customization
This chapter is an overview of IBM Lotus Domino Web Access and the topics covered in this
Redpaper. Specifically, we introduce you to:
What Domino Web Access is
The history of Domino Web Access
Why to customize Domino Web Access
How to customizable it
Upgrading a customized Domino Web Access environment
Going offline with customized Domino Web Access
Browser considerations
Language pack considerations
IBM support policy for customizations
1

4
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
1.1 Domino Web Access defined
Domino Web Access (formerly iNotes™ Web Access) is a sophisticated Web client that
delivers leading Domino messaging, collaboration, and personal information management
(PIM) capabilities to Web browsers. Browser users can take full advantage of Domino
services through an ultra-intuitive, easy-to-use interface, both online and offline, seamlessly.
Domino Web Access 7 was architected using the latest Web application development
technologies, such as AJAX, and can be centrally administered, and touts a low-touch to the
desktop deployment model.
Domino Web Access is a client that allows users to access different Domino services using a
Web browser. Domino Web Access provides the browser user with access to a number of
features that were previously only available for users with non-browser clients, such as Lotus
Notes. These features are in the areas of messaging, calendar and scheduling, personal
information management, task management, and personal journal.
1.1.1 Address Book and Journal
One major difference between the Domino Web Access client and the Notes client is that the
local address book and local journal do not exist with Domino Web Access. Instead, contact
and journal entries are stored in the mail file as opposed to separate databases. For users
that maintain both a Notes client and Domino Web Access, client agents are available to sync
contact and journal entries. The agent, which is part of the Domino Web Access template,
must be run from the Notes client.
1.1.2 Domino Offline Services
Users can also work offline to manage e-mail messages, contacts, calendars, to-do items,
and so forth via Domino Offline Services (DOLS).
1.1.3 Heterogeneous environment support
Domino Web Access can be used independently or together with the Lotus Notes client.
Users can use the Notes client while they are in their office environment, and use Domino
Web Access while they are remote and their only choice is to use a Web browser, such as
when they are at another user’s PC or on their home PC.
The Domino Web Access environment is comprised of five components:
Supported browser
Domino Server running the HTTP task
The mail template iNotesX.ntf and dwaX.ntf
Shared forms database (Forms5.nsf, Forms6.nsf, or Forms7.nsf)
Domino Offline Services (DOLS) for offline use
Note: Until Lotus Domino Version 6.5, Domino Web Access was called iNotes Web
Access, or iNotes. For this reason, many elements of Domino Web Access (such as mail
templates) still carry the iNotes name. For the sake of simplicity in this text, all versions of
the product including those released prior to Domino 6.5 are referred to as Domino Web
Access.

Chapter 1. Introduction to Lotus Domino Web Access customization
5
For an overview of Domino Web Access 7, refer to the product page at:
http://www-142.ibm.com/software/sw-lotus/products/product1.nsf/wdocs/dwawhatsnew
1.2 The history of Domino Web Access
The first browser-based mail client that could access Domino mail files was WebMail.
WebMail was introduced in Lotus Notes and Domino 4.6. It required the Web Mail template
(mailw46.ntf) or the Combo Mail template (mailc46.ntf). In Notes and Domino 5.x to 7.x,
WebMail template design elements were combined into the Standard Mail template
(mail50.ntf, mail60.ntf, mail7.ntf).
Domino Web Access (then called iNotes) was introduced in Domino 5.0.8 as a new standard
browser-based mail client for Lotus Domino. Key points are:
Enhanced Web access to Domino messaging/PIM capabilities
Targeted at
richer
browsers such as Internet Explorer® and Mozilla that have DHTML
support
Uses powerful Web technologies (XML, JavaScript™, DHTML, AJAX) to provide
enhanced usability, performance, and interface functionality over WebMail
Works with Domino Offline Services (DOLS) to allow users to access Web applications
(primarily mail files) offline.
1.3 Why customize Domino Web Access
Domino Web Access has a very rich set of features. With that in mind, why do customers still
want to customize it? As flexible and feature-rich as any application can be, there are always
unique customer needs or creative desires to be met. Some common customizations
requested by customers are:
Look and feel customization
Preferences customization
Add and remove features
Implementation of a mail retention policy
Integration with other systems (such as document management systems, J2EE™
applications, Portal applications, relational databases, and so on)
Before deciding to customize Domino Web Access, note that every release adds more
options and flexibility to customize Domino Web Access through administrative settings, for
example, configuration documents, notes.ini settings, and so on (see Appendix A, “Additional
customization tips” on page 105, for more information). The Domino Web Access design
team has devoted increasing attention to customization, and with Lotus Domino 7 the Domino
Web Access template is even more customizable.
Important: All of these components need to be considered in any case of customizing
Domino Web Access. Sometimes there are several ways to implement a specific
customization in different places. In all cases the customization should be tested in a
real-world environment.

6
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
1.4 How customizable Domino Web Access is
As you read this Redpaper, you will discover that Domino Web Access is highly
customizable. Domino Web Access is categorized as a markup-based application. As a
markup-based application, the markup or script is the factor that defines the look, feel, and
function of the application. Therefore, if you know what to change, you can customize Domino
Web Access by modifying this markup or script. This Redpaper provides you with the
guidance you need to determine where changes should be made in Domino Web Access to
accomplish the customization relevant to your business needs. In this Redpaper we use a
fictitious financial institution called ITSO Bank to illustrate the customizations necessary for
their business needs. You will read about it in Chapter 2, “Customization scenario - ITSO
Bank” on page 11.
There are two main areas of customizations discussed in this Redpaper:
Skin customization
Feature customization
These areas are covered in Chapter 4, “Skin customization techniques” on page 43, and
Chapter 5, “Feature customization techniques” on page 65.
In Domino Web Access 7.0.1, the only tool required for customization is the Domino
Designer® Client. However, “Tools helpful for Domino Web Access Development” on
page 106 discusses additional tools that are helpful for the customization process.
1.4.1 Skin customization
Chapter 4, “Skin customization techniques” on page 43, discusses how ITSO Bank changes
the look and feel of Domino Web Access in order to comply to their standard corporate GUI
design. This is followed by slightly more complicated examples involving moving skin
components and also explains how to move the search bar next to the Preferences button
and to remove the additional trash icon. The final example demonstrates how to create a new
skin component. Also illustrated is creating a skin component that displays the remaining
database size based on mail file quota.
Based on the scenario examples provided in this paper, you will be able to design
sophisticated real-world customizations. You will also find how much easier skin
customization with Domino Web Access Version 7.0.1 is compared to Version 6.5.
Skins are now easier to edit as the skins editor tool is not necessary for Forms7.nsf. All skins
are stored as file resource design elements. The names of relevant design elements will be
the skin group name followed by a hyphen followed by the skin type name.
This Redpaper equips you with techniques on:
Domino Web Access look and feel customization
Rearranging the layout of a skin
Removing skin components
Creating new skin components
1.4.2 Feature customization
Chapter 5, “Feature customization techniques” on page 65, demonstrates how extensible
Domino Web Access truly is. We start by covering various operations that can be performed
on action menus, such as overwrite, remove, and add Domino Web Access action menus.
Then we get into more complex customizations involving creating a custom dialog box and

Chapter 1. Introduction to Lotus Domino Web Access customization
7
implementing a QuerySave agent. In addition, we cover an example of the common
customizations for the Preferences dialog. Finally, we show you how to create a custom main
page in Domino Web Access by providing a step-by-step example.
Based on the examples provided in the feature customization section, you will be well
equipped to extend the customizations to meet your organization’s needs. You will learn
techniques to:
Manipulate action menus (overwrite, create, remove).
Create custom dialog box.
Implement the QuerySave agent.
Create a new main page.
Change the default settings in preferences.
1.5 Upgrading a customized Domino Web Access environment
Chapter 3, “Customization considerations” on page 17, discusses how Domino Web Access
has improved from previous releases. Before deciding to add a custom feature to Domino
Web Access, review the latest features. You may find that the feature your organization
needs is now available out of the box. For example, prior to Version 7.0.1, there is no
capability to import country-specific corporate holidays.
Unlike some of the mail template customizations for the Lotus Notes client, custom code in
Domino Web Access will not automatically work after a version upgrade. The reason is that
there are common external script files that may change from release to release. Additionally,
various releases emit the script tags in different ways. Therefore, it is important to consider
the following best practices for minimizing problems during the upgrade:
Use a custom forms file.
Isolate your custom code.
Document your changes.
Other considerations.
1.5.1 Use a custom forms file
Prior to Domino Web Access 7 it is difficult to have Domino Web Access use a custom forms
file other than the one that comes with the product (formsX.nsf, where X represents the
version number). “Different techniques to include externalized code” on page 106 shows in
detail how Domino Web Access can be forced to use a different default forms database.
1.5.2 Isolate your custom code
It is a good practice in Domino Web Access to separate your custom code from the
out-of-the-box Domino Web Access code. For example, instead of embedding custom Notes
Dictionary fields or vars, you can have them in a separate subform and then insert the
subform into the s_MailMemoDictionary subform. Refer to 5.3.3, “Modify
s_MailMemoDictionary subform” on page 74 for more information. There are also different
techniques to externalize code and caching operations to consider. These topics are covered
in detail in “Different techniques to include externalized code” on page 106.
1.5.3 Document your changes
Even though documentation is an important practice for any application development effort, it
is that much more important in Domino Web Access because you have to track the changes.

8
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
Then you will be able to port the changes to the next version by implementing the logic to the
new version of the forms file (formsX.nsf).
In some cases you might be able to simply copy and paste the custom code. However, if
Domino Web Access has changed its implementation, you might have to re-write the code so
that it will work in the new version. For example, the action menu structure has changed from
Version 6.5 to 7.0.1. Refer to 5.1, “Implementation overview” on page 66, for more
information.
1.5.4 Other considerations
In some cases Domino Web Access customization is only required for a subset of the users
in an organization. If so, you can consider setting up a separate environment for these users.
This can be done with two different forms files on the same server as outlined in “Different
techniques to include externalized code” on page 106. With such separation, if there are
resource constraints you have the option to upgrade those users who use out-of-box Domino
Web Access first and schedule the upgrade for the other group later.
1.6 Going offline with customized Domino Web Access
Domino Offline Services provides a way for users to take Domino Applications and mail files
offline, work in them, and synchronize the changes with an online replica on the Domino
server. Changes made to the Forms7.nsf file on the domino server are not automatically
included in the DOLS install. For performance reasons, the DOLS install is a pre-packaged
fileset that includes the standard Forms7.nsf. Customers have the ability to replace the
out-of-box Forms7.nsf with the custom Forms7.nsf from the fileset. In 3.11, “Taking
customized Domino Web Access offline” on page 41, we detail the steps for bringing Domino
Web Access customizations offline.
1.7 Browser considerations
In the real world there will almost never be two identical implementations of Domino Web
Access. So if the customization of Domino Web Access is considered for a particular
environment, the development team has to know everything about the browser software
used. Also, it is important to know which local desktop restrictions and security software are in
use and which security settings in the browser are set.
Important: It is important to know that if you have created custom main pages and dialog
box pages, you should not simply copy and paste the entire forms or subforms from the
older forms file to the newer one. The markup and scripts that are on the head portion of
these forms or subforms are different from release to release. You should start with one of
the main pages or dialog boxes that came out of the box and follow a similar procedure as
performed when you created the custom pages.
Note: For the customization examples within this Redpaper, the Redpaper team used
Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0 and Mozilla Firefox 1.0.x.

Chapter 1. Introduction to Lotus Domino Web Access customization
9
It is possible to do specific customizations for each browser type differently. For example, in
our ITSO Bank scenario the skin customization is done only for Microsoft Internet Explorer,
but the corporate logo is done for both, as shown in Figure 1-1.
Figure 1-1 Different customization sample for Mozilla Firefox and Microsoft Internet Explorer
1.8 Language pack considerations
Doing customization to a multilingual Domino environment is also possible using the same
techniques as we discussed for a single language environment. The design elements used
are all the same and have no language-specific names. The only difference in the design is
the $Language item on the respective design notes. The value will reflect the relevant
language the design note is to be used for.
Attention: Implementing Domino Web Access customizations in a multilingual Domino
environment requires applying the customizations to the design elements for each
language.
Also, skins are not language-specific, so any implementation should avoid placing
user-visible text directly within a skin. Rather, this is placed within skin components or
subforms.

10
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
1.9 IBM support policy for customized Domino Web Access
Customizing Domino database templates, including the Standard Mail template, is a common
practice with many customers. This has led to numerous questions regarding what type of
customization can be made to the Domino Web Access mail template. While it is possible to
customize Domino Web Access, and several customizations are discussed in this Redpaper,
please understand this disclaimer:
IBM Lotus Support neither certifies nor supports Domino Web Access installations using
altered templates or other customizations. IBM Lotus Support will instruct customers who
open incidents resulting from a customized template to revert to the stock template to see
whether the problem still occurs. If it does, IBM Lotus Support will troubleshoot the
problem as it exists in the stock template. If the problem does not exist in the stock
template, IBM Lotus Support will recommend that the customer remove the modifications
and submit an enhancement request of the desired functionality for the next release. This
policy includes the Forms6.nsf database as well.
The current, detailed support policy can be found online in technote 1100952 at:
http://www-1.ibm.com/support/docview.wss?rs=0&uid=swg21100952

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2006. All rights reserved.
11
Chapter 2.
Customization scenario - ITSO
Bank
In this chapter we introduce a financial institution, ITSO Bank, that has decided to customize
their Domino Web Access user interface (UI) to adopt their corporate standard Web design.
Additionally, ITSO Bank addresses a Sarbanes-Oxley (SOX) mail management compliance
issue by storing copies of outgoing e-mail messages in a separate Domino Database
repository.
The following customizations are addressed in detail:
Incorporate ITSO Bank corporate design:
– Color scheme
– Corporate logo
– Display available space
– Corporate login page
– Updating DOLS to bring customizations offline
Mail management compliance:
– Store a copy of each mail sent out.
– Remove functionality to block mail from the sender.
Integrate an account statement form:
– Create new documents.
– Read and edit existing documents.
– Enable the documents to be forwarded by mail.
This chapter outlines these customizations in general and points to the places in this book
where the specific implementation is documented.
2
Important: Note that this Redpaper does not address the business and legal perspectives
of SOX compliance. The scenario is solely used to outline the various techniques used to
accomplish Domino Web Access customizations.

12
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
2.1 Corporate standard design customization
By implementing a corporate standard design for ITSO Bank we demonstrate how skin
customization is accomplished in Domino Web Access. We examine stylesheet modifications
to illustrate implementing the corporate UI look and feel. We then discuss modifying HTML
layout files to modify and create skin components.
Figure 2-1 displays the out-of-the-box Domino Web Access user interface in comparison with
the customized look and feel of ITSO Bank UI shown in Figure 2-2 on page 13.
Figure 2-1 Before skin customization

Chapter 2. Customization scenario - ITSO Bank
13
Figure 2-2 After skin customization
Chapter 4, “Skin customization techniques” on page 43, provides you with step-by-step
instructions on how to accomplish the standard corporate design for ITSO Bank:
Modifying stylesheet
Modifying UI elements
– Background color for divider arrow
– Removing trash icon
– Relocating search bar
Modifying forms and subforms
– Introducing the corporate logo
Added a new skin component
– Available mail file space indicator
Customizing the login screen
2.2 Mail management compliance
ITSO Bank has a business requirement to implement and integrate an e-mail management
compliance system. The main reason is to be SOX compliant as well as having a secure copy
of every e-mail in a central repository. Other possible customizations utilizing the same
techniques outlined here are integration with other Notes and Domino applications as well as
non Notes and Domino applications and the integration of new user interfaces such as the
new account form illustrated later. The scenario is used to demonstrate the following
techniques:
Usage of a custom dialog box
Action menu operations
Integration of a new main page
Further customization techniques

14
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
Chapter 5, “Feature customization techniques” on page 65, discusses ITSO Bank mail
management compliance customization in detail and provides you with the step-by-step
instructions on how to accomplish the different implementations and integrations.
2.2.1 Custom dialog box creation
ITSO Bank requires their employees to select the document category and type for outgoing
mail messages from a list of given values prior to sending them. These meta data items are
stored in the document and are used for categorization in the mail compliance storage. This is
accomplished by overwriting the Domino Web Access
New Message
action so that it prompts
the employees to populate the header information via a dialog box (see Figure 2-3) before
displaying the Domino Web Access new message page.
Figure 2-3 Header Information dialog box
The following customization operations are covered in detail by the corresponding sections of
Chapter 5, “Feature customization techniques” on page 65:
Creating modal dialog box
Providing additional JavaScript functions for integration of the dialog box
Storing data from dialog box in memo form
JavaScript call to existing Domino Web Access functions (such as openNewShimmerDoc)
2.2.2 Action menu operations
ITSO Bank does not want its employees to filter any incoming messages to ensure that every
customer e-mail gets delivered and nothing important risks being blocked by a rule.
Therefore, ITSO Bank decided to remove the
Block Mail from Sender
item from the Tools
action menu, as shown in its default state in Figure 2-4.
Figure 2-4 Action menu operations
The following customization operations are covered in detail by the corresponding sections of
Chapter 5, “Feature customization techniques” on page 65:
Remove Tools → Block Mail from Sender submenu
Overwrite the New menu and New → Message submenu

Chapter 2. Customization scenario - ITSO Bank
15
2.2.3 Application integration
In order to provide a new form integrated in the Domino Web Access interface to create new
account statements, ITSO Bank wants to incorporate an existing Notes form. The form has
five fields in which to enter the appropriate data, as shown in Figure 2-5. For the first
approach the documents created are stored in the mail database of the user. The technique
to store a document in a different database is outlined in 2.2.4, “Further customization
examples” on page 15.
Figure 2-5 New account form
The following customization operations are covered in detail in the corresponding sections of
Chapter 5, “Feature customization techniques” on page 65:
Adding the New → Account submenu to create new documents based on the account
form.
Creating the backend form.
Creating the Domino Web Access form.
Integrating the form into Domino Web Access using the formsmap technique.
Reading existing documents through Domino Web Access.
Implementing an edit function for existing documents.
What is needed to forward a document by mail.
2.2.4 Further customization examples
The following are additional helpful techniques to create the code for the customizations
operating in the background of Domino Web Access. They are covered in detail in the
corresponding sections of Chapter 5, “Feature customization techniques” on page 65:
How to work with Custom_JS form
Use of QuerySave agents
Ability to interact with other applications (for example, copies of outgoing e-mail messages
stored in a Domino database repository)
2.3 Domino Offline Services
For the mobile ITSO Bank employee the above customizations can be delivered via Domino
Offline Services through a Web browser. This will boost productivity by providing a smooth

16
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
transition from online to offline. This is discussed in more detail in 3.11, “Taking customized
Domino Web Access offline” on page 41.

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2006. All rights reserved.
17
Chapter 3.
Customization considerations
This chapter outlines general customization considerations and improvements in Release 7
for Domino Web Access. In addition, we provide an in-depth discussion of the architecture
and page generation logic. This chapter includes:
General customization considerations
What is new regarding customization since Version 6.5
Domino Web Access architecture and components
Domino Web Access Web page generation components, logic, and process
Domino Web Access Web pages
Domino Web Access scenes, subscenes, skins, and skin components
Forms map
Domino Web Access special Web page elements
How to edit Domino Web Access markup
3

18
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
3.1 General customization considerations
Corporate layout and identity, as well as more functionality tailored to the specific needs in a
browser-based application environment, have made customization of Domino Web Access
very popular in companies like ITSO Bank. Tight integration with other Notes applications (as
well as non- Notes applications) is also very much desired for customization.
The next few sections provide an overview of the customization options in Domino Web
Access Version 6.5 and the subsequent improvements in Domino Web Access 7.
3.1.1 Domino Web Access Customization in Domino 6.5
Domino Web Access Version 6.5 was the first release that focused on making Domino Web
Access much more customizable. A Web developer or anyone with development skills in
JavaScript, CSS, and HTML could perform customizations. Version 6.5 also added a
Custom_Welcome form and a Custom_Banner subform. These and other features are
discussed in detail in Chapter 11 of Domino Web Access 6.5 on Linux, SG24-7060, all are an
improvement over the older releases of Domino Web Access where they were stored as
attachments to documents. How to modify images in Release 6.5 of Domino Web Access is
described in Chapter 11 of the IBM Redbook Domino Web Access 6.5 on Linux, SG24-7060.
Skin customization
Prior to Domino Web Access 7.0, you needed an additional tool for skin customization, called
DWA Skin Editor
, downloadable from the Lotus Sandbox on developerWorks® at:
http://www-10.lotus.com/ldd/sandbox.nsf/ecc552f1ab6e46e4852568a90055c4cd/66aed8a94
144eafa85256e2e006d38ba
Now in Release 7, the design elements for skins are stored as file resources. You can easily
export the file resources and make modifications with your editor of choice (for example,
Notepad, or your favorite professional text editor tool like Rational® Application Developer or
Visual Studio®). Once you finish with your changes you can import the modifications back
into Domino Designer. Also, you can use the Open with action to have Designer export this to
its temp directory and then invoke your favorite editor to edit this file. The Refresh action may
then be used to import in any saved changes to the temp file.
Action menu operations
The action menu implementation in Release 7 has changed drastically. The newer object
structure makes action menu manipulation easier. For instance, the function call that creates
a new menu entry does this automatically for the top menu as well as for the right-click menu.
Additionally, there are new functions that make working with the action menu far easier than
in previous releases. Refer to 5.1, “Implementation overview” on page 66, for more details.
Enable and disable functional areas
This item refers to a new INI setting that allows a way to easily turn off functional areas.
Previously there was a way to customize the template and remove elements in the Table of
Contents view, but it was too complicated for most people. This notes.ini setting makes it
much easier to do something like solely expose the mail and contacts functionality. With this
feature if mail is disabled in addition to not having the Mail tab, the Mail panels in Preferences
also disappear, and so do various actions that do not make sense if Mail is not available.
One of the significant improvements in the notes.ini settings is the capability to easily disable
certain functional areas. This is done by the notes.ini Variable iNotes_WA_Areas. The
specific values are documented in “iNotes_WA_Areas” on page 96.

Chapter 3. Customization considerations
19
New dwa: tags
The new dwa: tags are used in cases where only a custom Domino Web Access formula is
being called. It removes the need to invoke the formula evaluator and improves performance.
This new tag is designed to be extensible. The tags are defined in dwa_tags form.
Example 3-1 shows an example of a tag definition.
Example 3-1 Tag definition and usage example
The following shows a sample of a tag definition:
<tagdefinition name="getvars" outputformat="jscript">
<description>Provide access to the h_Vars functionality. </description>
<argument type="text" optional="yes" name="unidstring" />
<argument type="text" optional="yes" name="prefixstring" />
<argument type="text" optional="yes" name="includeall" />
<bodyfunction namespace="haiku" builtin="h_Vars" />
</tagdefinition>
and here’s an example of the usage:
<dwa:getvars includeall=“0” />
Base64 encoding replaced by @formula
Formulas on forms and subforms are no longer compiled and Base64 encoded and hence
are easily modifiable.
Base64 encoding was necessary for performance reasons for optimizations. In Release 7,
server-side forms processing code has been enhanced to compile these formulas the first
time the form is processed and then to store the compiled formula within a server cache to
avoid having to recompile it every time the form is utilized. This is a huge improvement for
customization.
Reduced line length to meet Designer limitations
Reducing the line length is another enhancement. Prior to Version 6.5.5, if a form had been
built and saved with edits in a tool other than Domino Designer, the line length sometimes
would be truncated when edited in Designer. This would result in broken script files.
Since Version 7, the line length in the build process has been reduced so that all forms can
be edited with Designer without breaking the scripts. This enhancement has been
implemented in Versions 6.5.5 and 7.
QueryOpen/QuerySave agents
In traditional Domino Web applications developers are familiar with the QueryOpen and
QuerySave agents. Now this option is available in Domino Web Access as well. This feature
was developed for Domino Web Access 7 and also added to Version 6.5.5.
In Domino Web Access, QueryOpen and QuerySave agents must reside in the mail template
and can be written in any of the supported agent languages (Notes formula, LotusScript, or
Java™).
Obfuscation list as file resource
One of the customization challenges in Domino Web Access is that JavaScript code used in
Domino Web Access is obfuscated (or condensed). This is necessary to improve the runtime
performance of the application.

20
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
The obfuscation list, a text file that describes the mapping of the meaningful names to the
obfuscated names, is now included as a file resource in the forms database, in both Release
6.5.5 and 7. The descriptive names give developers a better idea of what the JavaScript
functions are for.
For releases prior to 7 the obfuscation list could be retrieved as additional material for the IBM
Redbook Domino Web Access 6.5 on Linux, SG24-7060.
Example 3-2 Sample section of obfuscationlist.txt
============================================================
The keys on the left have replaced the following functions and variables in DWA
code:
============================================================
AA IWAOfflineCtrl_DoInstall
AB getViewList
AC bEditable
AD refreshtree
AE sFormsFile
AF tableMenu
...
Lite skin fully incorporated
Lite skins were
originally introduced to speed up performance by reducing the number of
images employed within Domino Web Access pages. Starting in Release 7, the lite skins are
incorporated into the normal skins, so there is no difference anymore in loading the default UI
versus the lite UI of Domino Web Access.
The lite skins are no longer utilized by Domino Web Access Release 7.
3.1.2 Custom_JS form
The
Custom_JS
form in Version 7 still plays an important role in Domino Web Access
customization. It serves as a container for a collection of customization entry point functions
that are included in almost every Domino Web Access page. The core part of this was the
introduction of a common non-obfuscated form named Custom_JS, which is an external
script file emitted along with just about every Domino Web Access page.
Within this script file there are some key callback routines that get invoked from the normal
code and allow specific places where a developer might gain control and alter Domino Web
Access functionality or behavior. At present, the key entry points are just before the action
menu is displayed, during the JavaScript onload handling, and whenever a submit is about to
occur to the server (in other words, an action is about to be executed).
The Custom_JS form is also a place where custom static script routines might reside. It is
important to remember that only static scripts should be placed here.
Custom_JS is cached and therefore it should not be used to put user-specific scripts or
formulas there. The more appropriate form for user-specific code is in form
s_SessionInfo
. For
Tip: To use the obfuscation list, export the
ObfuscationList.txt
file resource from Domino
Designer to the disk drive. You can then open it with an editor of choice and perform lookup
on any obfuscated abbreviation. Refer to Example 3-2 on page 20 to see what the list
looks like.

Chapter 3. Customization considerations
21
example, if you have a lookup based on the user logged in, you should have the lookup in
s_SessionInfo. If the lookup is performed in Custom_JS, the formula would be evaluated for
the first user who logged in, and the output is cached on the server. This evaluated value will
then be incorrect for all other users.
In “Different techniques to include externalized code” on page 106 there are two different
ways shown to externalize code from forms and subforms.
The functions provided as a standard entry point include:
Scene_Actions, called just before the action buttons are added to the action bar. Some
possible customizations include adding a new item, removing an item, or changing the
position of an action item.
Scene_PostLoad, called after the body is loaded.
Scene_PreSubmit, called just before a form is submitted, but after Domino Web Access
has done its own validation.
Additional useful functions in Custom_JS are documented in Table 3-1.
Table 3-1 Callbacks and functions
3.2 Domino Web Access architecture
In order to customize Domino Web Access it is important to understand the architecture and
the processes of how the different components are integrated and work together, as well as
how they are used to construct Domino Web Access pages. Figure 3-1 shows an overview
graphic of the general Domino Web Access architecture. As shown, the user’s mail files
inherit their design from the dwa7 template. The page is finally generated with the HTML and
Note: HTTP responses to URL requests from the forms file that have the &MaxExpires (or
&MX) argument specified will be cached on the server.
Tip: Add to the s_SessionInfo form if per-user or per-mail file formula computations are
needed. This can be done via a subform or via an external script (for example, if a
user-specific profile setting should be retrieved and assigned to a global javascript var).
Function Meaning
Scene_Actions Add, remove, or change actions.
Scene_PostLoad Invoked after page has executed its onLoad
handlers (but still within onload event).
Scene_PreSubmit Invoked prior to submitting an action to the
server.
API_SetWelcomePageInboxColumns Set which columns get displayed for the Mail
panel in the Welcome page.
API_TimeZones Add additional time zones.
API_GetSelectedDocs Return array of strings representing UNIDs.
API_IsView Return true if view page.
API_GetMailfilePath Return URL path up to and including .nsf.

22
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
JavaScript from the forms7 database and the document and view contents read and stored to
the user’s mail file.
Figure 3-1 Domino Web Access architecture overview
3.2.1 Templates and forms files
The following subsections describe the technical architecture and design elements of Domino
Web Access and the components needed for the page generation.
The Domino Web Access template inherits fully from the standard mail template. This allows
the same user experience offered by the standard mail template when using the Notes client.
For typical Notes applications this is about it and all the design elements are located within
the template.
However, for Domino Web Access the template also has a reference to another Notes
database known as the forms file. This is where the majority of the design elements that
impact the Domino Web Access UI reside and where you will need to make most of your
customizations.
When the Domino Web Access template is associated with a user's mail file (when either
creating a new mail file or doing a design/replace), the reference to the forms file also moves
over to the mail file. This reference to the forms file is stored in a notes item in the icon design
note. This is explained in more detailed in 3.2.2, “Special icon note items” on page 24.
So the key thing to understand is that design elements within the forms file and the user's
mail file work together to help build a typical Domino Web Access page.
Domino Web Access template
A Domino Web Access user’s mail file is based on the
iNotesX.ntf
or
dwaX.ntf
template,
where X refers to a version number, for example, iNotes6.ntf or dwa7.ntf.
The relationship between mail template file name and version, the Lotus Domino version, and
the forms file name is documented in a table in the public technote 1158614, which is
available online at:
http://www-1.ibm.com/support/docview.wss?rs=0&q1=1158614&uid=swg21158614&loc=en_US
&cs=utf-8&cc=us&lang=en
The differences between the Domino Web Access templates and the standard mail templates
(mail7.ntf, for example) are transparent to users when accessing a Domino Web Access mail
file via the Notes client. The Domino Web Access template offers full compatibility with the
mail7.ntf
dwa7.ntf
Fully Inherits
Mail/JUser.nsf
iNotes/Forms7.nsf
Inherits
DWA Page
References

Chapter 3. Customization considerations
23
Notes client. In other words, users who access mail files from the Notes client will not notice
anything different.
Although the Domino Web Access template has all of the standard forms and views
associated with the standard mail template (for compatibility with the Notes client), most of
the design elements used to generate and display Domino Web Access in the browser are
retrieved from the shared forms database. The only design elements used from the Domino
Web Access template are:
Standard views/folders
Proxy documents
The Domino Web Access template maintains some native design elements that are distinct
from the standard mail template, such as:
One agent to synchronize the journal entries called
Synchronize Journal
. Another agent to
synchronize the address book called
Synchronize Address Book
is contained within the
standard mail template and supports the synchronization for both WebMail and Domino
Web Access.
Views explicitly for Domino Web Access:
– Tasks view named Haiku_TasksAll
– TOC views named Haiku_TOC) and iNotes_ArchiveTOC
– Proxy document view named iNotes
– Meeting Notices view named iNotesNotices
– Contacts view named iNotes_Contacts
– Notebook view named $Journal
The Shared Forms database
The
FormsX.nsf
(X refers to a version number) database is one of the databases included as
part of Domino Web Access. It contains most of the JavaScript, pass-through HTML, and
images used to implement the User Interface (UI) of Domino Web Access.
All the forms, subforms, and graphics used by Domino Web Access (except for certain
images in mail views that are either in the Domino icons directory or within the mail template)
reside in the FormsX.nsf database located within the <domino data>\iNotes\ subdirectory on
the server.
The reason for keeping design elements in a different database, instead of in individual mail
databases, is that they can be cached on the server. All the Web browsers accessing mail
files on a server will use the same design elements, which can be loaded from the server’s
cache. Caching the elements on the server allows better performance on the server.
The forms database is used by the Web server to assemble the appropriate forms based on
user action and then serve them to the client as the Domino Web Access UI. It is located in
the <domino data>\iNotes\ directory on the Domino Web Access server.
The Forms database includes the following design elements:
Forms
Subforms
Note: The new Domino Web Access templates for Version 7.0.1 delivered through IBM
Lotus Notes access for SAP solutions are also supported by Domino Web Access though
the SAP functionality is only available in the Notes client. For more information refer to:
http://www-128.ibm.com/developerworks/lotus/library/notesforsap/

24
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
Graphics - stored as file resources
JavaScript
Skins (HTML and CSS files used to define the general layout of various pages) - stored as
file resources
Forms map table (maps Notes forms to corresponding Domino Web Access forms) -
stored as documents in a special view
3.2.2 Special icon note items
In 3.2.1, “Templates and forms files” on page 22, a reference has been mentioned between
the Domino Web Access mail template and the forms database. This reference is stored in
special items of the icon design note. Figure 3-2 shows the icon design note property box with
the special items.
\
Figure 3-2 The icon design note properties
Within the icon design note of databases created or updated with a Domino Web Access mail
template is a field named $WebHybridDB. The value of this field is set to 1, indicating that this
is a Domino Web Access mail database. This is how the Domino Web server identifies a
Domino Web Access mail file. The icon note also includes a field called $FormsTemplateFile.
For the dwa7.ntf template file the default values for special Domino Web Access items of the
icon design note are shown in Table 3-2.
Table 3-2 Default values for special Domino Web Access properties of icon design notes
These three items govern the association and move over when a Domino Web Access
template is assigned to a mail file. The first two are used to trigger some different code paths
on the Domino Web server — whether to use the traditional Domino Web page algorithms or
the Quickplace and Domino Web Access introduced ones. This is what allows an
?OpenDocument on any document in the mail file to either display the normal WebMail
rendering or the Domino Web Access rendering based on which template is being employed.
Property Value
$HaikuFlags 1
$WebHybridDb 1
$FormsTemplateFile iNotes/Forms7.nsf

Chapter 3. Customization considerations
25
3.3 Domino Web Access Web page generation
It is important to understand how the Web pages for Domino Web Access are generated by
the http server. The following sections give an overview of how page generation works and
which components are involved in the process.
3.3.1 Domino Web Access Web page architecture
The main pages of Domino Web Access use the form
h_PageUI
for their construction.
Figure 3-3 shows the main Notes form h_PageUI elements used for the construction of the
main Domino Web Access Web pages. For the differentiation of main pages and other pages
see 3.4, “Domino Web Access Web pages” on page 28.
Figure 3-3 Domino Web Access Web page construction
h_PageUI
The form h_PageUI contains the HTML opening and closing tags and includes various other
subforms and components. The inclusion of subforms is not done in the way Notes normally
uses subforms. Subforms are included with the special DWA tag
<InsertNotesSubForm
name=....>
. These special tags can be cascaded so that a subform can include a subform
that again can include a subform, and so on. More detailed information is covered in 3.8,
“Domino Web Access special Web page elements” on page 33.
Attention: Be aware that at present there are some security checks built into the Domino
server to only honor a fixed list of forms files. You might be tempted to experiment with
adding these items to other application templates, but be warned that this is supported
only for Domino Web Access templates.
Even if it is possible to change these item values, they should remain untouched. There is
a better way to change the forms database, which is described in “Different techniques to
include externalized code” on page 106. It shows in detail how Domino Web Access can
be forced to use a different default forms database.
<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC “-//W3C/DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional/EN”>
<html>
h_Page UI
h_HTMLHeadContent
<Scene>_Init
QuickPlace Skin contents
PageContent_SkinComponent
h_HTMLTailContent
<head>
<script...></script><link...>...inser:common scripts and stylesheet
</head>
<body class=“h-page-bg”...>
</body>
</html>
<Scene>

26
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
h_HTMLHeadContent
The first subform included is the h_HTMLHeadContent. This subform also includes a subform
named s_CommonVars. Both contain a lot of JavaScript code and also special Domino Web
Access @formulas to set up the Domino Web Access page environment. See 3.8.4, “Special
Domino Web Access formulas” on page 37, for more information about how to use @formulas
in Domino Web Access. The h_HTMLHeadContent also includes the scene initialization for
the active
scene
. For details about scenes refer to 3.5, “Domino Web Access scenes and
subscenes” on page 29. For example, the included subform could be the custom subform
s_AccountRead_Init designed for ITSO Bank. To create a new subform for initialization of a
new main page see “Subform s_AccountRead_Init” on page 83.
Body
After the HTML header the body starts next. The body contains a special DWA tag called
<QuickPlaceSkin>
. This tag is a placeholder that is replaced with the full contents of the
appropriate skin (within the appropriate skin group) for this page. The skin consists of the
PageContent skin component and possibly other additional skin components or subforms.
The page content skin component is again a subform named PageContent_SkinComponent.
This subform includes more subforms to construct the page. One of them is the scene
subform for the document type or view being displayed. In the ITSO Bank scenario, this is
s_AccountRead, which contains the unique HTML and JavaScript code for the page. The
subform is described in “Subform s_AccountRead” on page 84.
h_HTMLTailContent
The next step is to close the body tag and to load the h_HTMLTailContent subform that
contains additional JavaScript code and @formulas to load some helper functions into the
browser.
At last the html page is closed.
The special HTML tags as well as the special URL parameters for the Domino Web Access
page construction are explained in 3.8.3, “Special URL arguments” on page 35, and 3.8.4,
“Special Domino Web Access formulas” on page 37.
3.3.2 Domino Web Access Web page generation process
When a database is opened with a browser, the Domino Web server processes the URL and
inspects the database icon note for a field called $WebHybridDB. If this field is found and its
value is set to 1 (default value), the Domino Web server recognizes that this is an Domino
Web Access mail database.
Next, the Domino Web Access logic in the Domino Web server is invoked, overriding the
server’s normal operation. The Domino Web Access logic locates the shared forms database
by retrieving the value from the field $FormsTemplateFile (also found in the database icon
note). The Domino URL ?OpenDatabase results in a server-side redirect to an
?OpenDocument URL to display the s_Start scene. This scene then redirects to the desired
first functional area view page, based on server configuration settings or personal user
preference settings. If no specific page is specified, then a URL is generated to the first
document the user has access to within the view called s_TOC (Table of Contents).
Special tags (as shown in 3.8, “Domino Web Access special Web page elements” on
page 33) are interpreted by the server to:
Insert skin.
Insert skin components.
Insert subforms.

Chapter 3. Customization considerations
27
Evaluate computed blocks (@formulas).
Determine persisted and computed-only items.
All URLs to top-level pages have two levels (view level and document level) after the .nsf
extension. The parts of a Domino Web Access URL are annotated in Figure 3-4.
Figure 3-4 Annotated Domino Web Access URL
The Domino Web Access mail template contains a special view named iNotes, which houses
special proxy design elements (as shown in 3.3.3, “Proxy documents” on page 27) being
used by the HTTP task to process the URL and insert the appropriate forms, subforms, and
other elements into the HTML stream to the browser.
3.3.3 Proxy documents
Domino Web Access uses the QuickPlace® architecture for generating Web pages. Every
page generated is generated as a result of a ?OpenDocument or ?EditDocument URL. There
is no concept of opening a view, but pages may be generated that contain data from one or
more Domino views.
Displaying a view is done via Proxy documents. Proxy documents can be opened via the
?OpenDocument URL command and can include data from a view. Examples of proxy
document design elements are iwaMail, iwaCalendar, and iwaContacts. They are located in
the Domino Web Access mail template.
The special Domino Web Access page generation logic takes care of a bunch of special
markup tags and formula code in the page source. The most commonly used are explained in
3.8, “Domino Web Access special Web page elements” on page 33.
The Proxy documents are viewable from the Notes client (open db to view hidden views). The
meaning of these documents is to wire specific scenes for specific pages. Figure 3-5 shows
an example of a proxy document.
Figure 3-5 shows a proxy document in the Notes client. This is possible but a little bit more
work to see the fields and document structure through the document properties dialog.
http://smartu1.cam.itso.ibm.com/mail/slukito.nsf/iNotes/Welcome/?OpenDocument&KIC
&UNH=siekuuevOrhpeh2h5scn4s7sv4o4
Server URL Mail File Path TOC View Proxy Document Keep in Cache
User Name Hash
Tip: Proxy documents can be viewed with the NotesPeek utility. This utility is shown in
“NotesPeek” on page 106.

28
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
Figure 3-5 Proxy document
3.4 Domino Web Access Web pages
There are two types of Web pages in Domino Web Access: main pages and other types of
pages. The following subsections outline samples of these page types and also some
differences.
3.4.1 Main pages
All main pages in Domino Web Access use the h_PageUI form for page construction by
default. The following paragraph lists examples of main pages:
Mail view page
New Message page
Read Contact Object page
Edit Calendar Entry page
Preferences page
Out of Office page
Examples of main pages in Domino Web Access are:
Memo
To Do
Appointment
Contact
3.4.2 Other pages
Unlike main pages, the
other
type of page does not use h_PageUI form. It uses the other
form by utilizing the “&Form=” argument to override the form specified for the document being
manipulated. Dialog pages are examples of other pages. The following lists some examples
of dialog box in Domino Web Access:
Delivery options

Chapter 3. Customization considerations
29
About Domino Web Access
In order to clarify the differences between the main and other pages, let us examine the URL
of the New Memo main page:
http://smartu1.cam.itso.ibm.com/mail/slukito.nsf/($Drafts)/$new/?EditDocument&Form
=h_PageUI&PresetFields=h_EditAction;h_New,s_NotesForm;Memo
And the URL for the delivery options dialog box:
http://smartu1.cam.itso.ibm.com/mail/slukito.nsf/iNotes/Proxy/?OpenDocument&Form=s
_DeliveryOptions
As you can see from the example above, the URL for the main page uses the
&Form=h_PageUI argument versus the URL for the dialog box, which uses the
&Form=s_DeliveryOptions argument to override the form.
Only the h_PageUI form utilizes the <QuickplaceSkin> tag. In other words, the Domino Web
Access dialog pages do not use this tag, and hence do not leverage skins or scenes. Rather,
they reference the appropriate skin group stylesheet and define the dialog page layout
entirely within the form.
3.5 Domino Web Access scenes and subscenes
In 3.4, “Domino Web Access Web pages” on page 28, we already mentioned that all pages
use the h_PageUI form, which uses the <QuickplaceSkin> tag to bring in a skin. The skin has
a very important PageContent skin component into which plays a
scene
. Therefore scenes
are really what give each Domino Web Access page its unique visible content.
A scene consists of two subforms — one with the scene name followed by "_Init" to represent
content to be emitted in the HEAD area of a page and the other with the actual scene name,
which is emitted in the body of the page. Refer to Figure 3-6 on page 30 for a visualization of
the subforms belonging to a scene.
Example 3-3 Scene subforms
<SceneName>_Init - Content within the <head> section of the page
<SceneName> - Content within the <body> section of the page
Scenes are relevant only for skins that employ the PageContent_SkinComponent and forms
that employ the <QuickplaceSkin> tag.
3.5.1 Standard read and edit scenes and subscenes
Some key computed variables determine which scene is played, as shown in Example 3-4.
Example 3-4 Scene selection based on variable
h_SetReadScene: used when ?OpenDocument URL is in effect
h_SetEditScene: used when ?EditDocument URL is in effect
Domino Web Access utilizes a common read scene and edit scene for almost all read object
pages and edit object pages, respectively. This allows a mechanism to share code and
markup common to several objects. Hence, most Domino Web Access object pages will have
h_SetReadScene set to s_StdPageRead and h_SetEditScene set to s_StdPageEdit.
Nothing prevents the same scene to be specified for both the h_SetReadScene and

30
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
h_SetEditScene. For example, the Domino Web Access preferences page is set up in this
manner.
If all the Domino Web Access object pages used the same standard read and edit scene, how
does Domino Web Access get the New Calendar Entry page to look different from the New
Message page? Domino Web Access's standard read and edit scenes implement logic to
load additional subforms that contain the actual object-specific layout details. This collection
of subforms is known as
subscenes
.
Like a scene, a subscene also consists of a subform to be used within the head section of the
page and a subform to be used within the body section of the page In addition, there is a
subform that defines the
schema
for the object. Each object typically has both a read
subscene and an edit subscene, and the subscene dictionary is used for both. For a standard
read object page, here is a summary of the relevant subforms that comprise the subscene:
<subscene prefix>+Read_Init: <head> portion
<subscene prefix>+Dictionary: defines "schema" for object
<subscene prefix>+Read: <body> portion
For a standard edit object page, the relevant subscene subforms are:
<subscene prefix>+Edit_Init: <head> portion
<subscene prefix>+Dictionary: defines the "schema" for object
<subscene prefix>+Edit: <body> portion
For the ITSO Bank scenario, implementing a whole new main page is demonstrated in 5.5.5,
“Special subforms for page creation” on page 80. We show how the different subforms are
created and contribute to the page content.
Figure 3-6 shows the structure of the html document regarding the insertion of the scene
subforms.
Figure 3-6 Visual display of scenes and subscenes
3.6 Domino Web Access skins
A skin, also referred to as a
skin type
, defines the layout, HTML, and CSS for a Domino Web
Access Web page. This is done through a set of files stored as file resources in the forms
database. These files are grouped together by the browser they are made for.
<head>
s_StdPageRead_Init
s_StdPageRead
<script src=“...s_StdPageReadCode”></script>
</head>
<body>
</body>
<s_SubScenePrefix>Read
<s_SubScenePrefix>Read_Init
<s_SubScenePrefix>Dictionary

Chapter 3. Customization considerations
31
3.6.1 Skin group
A skin group defines a set of skins sharing the same stylesheet. There are two primary skin
groups in the shared forms database for Domino Web Access:
h_ShimmerSkin - used for Internet Explorer
h_ShimmerSkin_Gecko - used for Mozilla and Firefox
Contents of both skin groups are identical except for stylesheet.
There are two less significant skin groups:
h_ShimmerSkin_UB - for unsupported browsers, displays a special form to direct users to
WebMail instead of using the Domino Web Access frontend
h_ShimmerSkin_ACC - for accessibility, currently not used
3.6.2 Skin type (skin)
Skin types are members of a specific skin group. Any skin type can only be a member of one
skin group. If it is needed in two skin groups there have to be two skin types. Every skin type
defines a specific layout in HTML markup to emit within the page body to govern the overall
page layout. For example, the h_ListFolder skin type defines the layout for any view or folder
that is displayed through Domino Web Access.
The primary Domino Web Access skin types are:
h_ListFolder
h_MailPage
h_Edit
h_Page
h_Portal
For Domino 7.0.0 and 7.0.1, the Forms7.nsf file contained two skin types that are not used:
h_DwaLite
h_PortalLite
They were introduced in Version 6.5.5 for the display of the lite skin, which minimizes the use
of images to gain better performance. For Domino 7, the spirit of these changes was
incorporated into the main h_ListFolder and h_Portal skins, and hence these were no longer
utilized, and have been removed in Version 7.0.2.
There is also one special skin type: h_Stylesheet (CSS file). It contains the cascading
stylesheet called CSS definitions for the skin group. This one file is the most important to
modify if corporate design in terms of colors and fonts have to be brought into Domino Web
Access.
3.6.3 Which skin is used
Special items in the JavaScript influence the skin group and skin type to use on a specific
page:
h_SetSkinGroup NOTESVAR sets the skin group to use, defined in the s_CommonVars
subform.
h_SkinTypeOverride NOTESVAR provides a means of specifying the specific skin type.

32
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
For example, if a mail page is displayed for reading mail, the variable h_SkinTypeOverride is
set to 'h_MailPage'. To get the specific value of a Domino Web Access page just look into the
page source and search for the variables mentioned.
If the h_SkinTypeOverride variable is not set, h_Type NOTESVAR determines the skin by the
simplified logic shown in Example 3-5.
Example 3-5 Simplified synopsis of skin type selection logic (if h_SkinTypeOverride is not explicitly
specified)
If page is opened with ?EditDocument in the URL use h_Edit skin
Else If h_Type==“1” (QP Type of Folder) use the h_ListFolder skin
Otherwise use the h_Page skin (last fallback strategy)
Special items identify skin group and skin type being used for further usage in JavaScript on
the page if needed. For example, if it is needed to know whether a document is in edit mode,
or if a mailpage or notebookpage is currently displayed, these variables can be used:
h_CurrentSkinName var identifies skin group
h_CurrentSkinType var identifies skin type
To get these variable contents from an actual page, the page’s html source can be displayed
by the browser. This is shown in 4.1, “Skin customization overview” on page 44.
3.6.4 Skin components
As discussed previously, skin components are subforms that implement a specific visible
area of a page outside the main essential data content of a view or form. Skin components
provide a mechanism for centralizing the html or javascript to realize this visible area and
reuse the component within different skins.
Unlike a plain subform, the skin component has a mechanism to specify arguments when the
component is defined within a skin, and the skin component can then render itself differently
based on the argument. For instance, the PanelToggle skin component is set up to be initially
expanded when used within the h_ListFolder skin, but collapsed when used within the
h_Portal skin.
Their purpose is to externalize code or page fragments to specific subforms and use them as
an included block in the html page design. Skin components are used in the skin type (as
shown in 3.6.2, “Skin type (skin)” on page 31) to put specific functional areas on the page.
Examples are:
TOC
Outline
Actionbar
Tools
Online awareness
Tip: It is a best practice to introduce new skin components when implementing new visual
areas for the overall page. The ITSO Bank example that shows the space left in the current
mail file in megabytes until the quota is reached is implemented as a skin component.
Refer to 4.5, “Adding a new skin component” on page 60, for the steps to implement a skin
component.

Chapter 3. Customization considerations
33
3.7 Forms map table
To map the fields of a backend Notes form to a Domino Web Access form definition, a
mapping document is needed in forms7.nsf. This forms mapping document needs to be
defined with a form called FormsMap in the forms7.nsf, which is not included in the product.
Figure 5-6 on page 79 shows the definition for the fields needed for this form.
Formsmap is actually a Notes view in the forms database. This view, as shown in Figure 3-7,
houses all the formsmap documents that define the read and edit scenes utilized for a
particular Notes backend form type.
Figure 3-7 Forms map view in Notes client
If the scene in the formsmap document is set to s_StdPageRead or s_StdPageEdit, then the
value of the s_SubFormPrefix column defines the subscene prefix for the backend form.
For more details and how to create or modify formsmap documents refer to 5.5.3, “Add the
FormsMap form to forms7.nsf” on page 79.
3.8 Domino Web Access special Web page elements
This section outlines several additional special design elements Domino Web Access uses
for Web page construction.
3.8.1 Special server-side tags
Domino Web Access introduced new special server-side html tags to implement several
special functions within the application. The following sections outline the different kinds of
special tags and functions and how they are used.
Insert content from other design elements
There are three new special tags that are recognized by the Domino http task to insert
additional content in the actual page:

34
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
<InsertNotesSubForm Name=SubFormName>
<QuickPlaceSkin>
<QuickPlaceSkinComponent Name=xxx>
First <InsertNotesSubForm Name=SubFormName> is used to insert the specified subform
content as passthrough html (or JavaScript) in the place where the special tag resides. If the
inserted code contains another insertion tag, this is also parsed and expanded by the server.
The name of the subform may be a computed value. To get the name computed use a
formula like @{...}. The formulas are explained in 3.8.4, “Special Domino Web Access
formulas” on page 37. Conditional insertions are also possible by having the Name attribute
value be evaluated by a formula. @If may be used to consider other criteria and conditionally
include one subform or another. If the desire is in some cases to not insert anything, an empty
name value will insert nothing.
<QuickPlaceSkin> inserts the contents of the skin type for the current skin group. See 3.5,
“Domino Web Access scenes and subscenes” on page 29, for an additional explanation.
<QuickPlaceSkinComponent Name=xxx> inserts the contents of a subform named
xxx_SkinComponent. Because skin components are also subforms, one could think that
these are redundant to <InsertNotesSubForm>, but <QuickplaceSkinComponent> has
optional Format and Argument attributes used by some skin components.
Argument translates to javascript arg, which is accessible by the skin component. The
argument can be used to display different content from the same skin component in different
skins. For instance, providing “0” as an argument for the Logout skin component, as shown in
Example 3-6, results in nothing being displayed if the user is logged in. However, if the user is
not logged in, the Login link is displayed. If you wish to remove the Logout option from
Domino Web Access, we encourage you to use this argument rather than removing the skin
component altogether (because the skin component doubles as the login option for a mail file
opened with anonymous access).
Format supports the special <Item> tag to allow means of excluding some markup if the tag is
determined at runtime to be not displayed. Real tag contents are emitted there. Example 3-6
shows how this special tag is used in skins with all optional parameters.
Example 3-6 Format and argument parameters used by <QuickPlaceSkinComponent>
<QuickPlaceSkinComponent Name="Logout" Argument=“0”
Format={<td class="s-toptoolbar-text s-toptoolbar-bg-middle" nowrap><Item></td>}>
Persisted and computed for display items
As outlined in 3.5.1, “Standard read and edit scenes and subscenes” on page 29, and shown
in Figure 3-6 on page 30, there are special tags to define fields and items for the mapping
between the JavaScript and HTML frontend in Domino Web Access and the Notes backend
document. This mapping is maintained through the actual scene’s
<Subformprefix>_Dictionary subform. Other forms and subforms may also include the special
tags for individual field mappings.
NotesDictionary Tag
<NotesDictionary>…</NotesDictionary> is the pair of tags enclosing all fieldmappings in the
dictionary. The enclosed block may contain NotesVar and NotesField tags.
NotesField Tag
<NotesField Name=ItemName> defines a persisted field. The field may have up to four
optional parameters:

Chapter 3. Customization considerations
35
Type=Text|TextList|RichText|Mime|Number|NumberList| Time|TimeList defines the
fieldtype.
InitialValue=... evaluated if item does not exist within document.
Value=... evaluated as page is generated and as page is saved.
Includeif=“@formula” is an optional attribute for conditional inclusion (new in Forms7.nsf).
For example, <NotesField Name=Subject>.
NotesVar Tag
<NotesVar Name=ItemName> defines a computed-for-display-only item. This tag has the
same element attributes as the Notes field. See Example 5-4 on page 74 for a sample usage
of NotesVar.
3.8.2 Extensible tags
As part of the Domino Web Access performance and scalability improvements in Domino 7,
an additional page generation enhancement supports the specification of namespace
qualified tags. This allows for replacing stand-alone invocations of special Haiku
@DbCommands such as the h_RunAgent formula. This results in the compiled version of:
@{@DbCommand("Haiku"; "h_RunAgent"; AgentName; "1")}
Being replaced with the following:
<dwa:runagent agentname="AgentName" commonagent="1" />
The first is what is found in Forms6.nsf, and the second is what is found in Forms7. The first
occurrence of a dwa: tag results in the Web server looking for and processing a special
dwa_tags form. This form contains a special XML syntax that defines the various dwa: tags. If
you search the dwa_tags form for runagent, you will find the XML stream (some line breaks
are added for legibility) shown in Example 3-7.
Example 3-7 XML stream for runagent tag definition
<tagdefinition name="runagent">
<description> Haiku::RunAgent
@DbCommand("Haiku", "h_RunAgent", "<Agent name>" [, "<CommonAgent? 1:0"])
---------------------The last parameter was changed to a boolean flag since the
code threw away the arguments anyway. Run a named database agent.
</description>
<argument type="fieldname" name="agentname" />
<argument type="text" optional="yes" name="commonagent" />
<bodyfunction namespace="haiku" builtin="h_RunAgent" />
</tagdefinition>
This allows for the replacement of various compute blocks that were calling the special Haiku
@DbCommands with special dwa namespace tags that are easier to read, are
self-documenting, and avoid having to initialize and utilize the compute engine, which is a
relatively expensive operation.
3.8.3 Special URL arguments
Domino Web Access uses special URL arguments to control environment settings and the
mode and context of how a document is displayed.

36
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
Default form override
&Form=FormName triggers the http server to use the specified form rather than any form
value associated with the current document. For example, a developer can use the
&Form=h_DumpItems URL argument. This will display a page listing all NotesDictionary
variables instead of the normal form. So this parameter can be used to override the form
specified for the document being displayed.
Setting default field values
&PresetFields= provides a way to override Notes Dictionary items by specifying multiple
name/value pairs. Each name and value is separated by a semicolon (;) and each pair is
separated by a comma (,). For example, the mail page uses this argument to identify the view
or folder to display and what label to give it:
filename.nsf/iNotes/Mail/?OpenDocument&PresetFields=
s_ViewLabel;Inbox,s_ViewName;(%24Inbox)&...
(The %24 is the URL encoding of the $ character.) URL arguments can also be used to
control the caching of the pages to maximize performance, while insuring that the user is
working with the latest data.
This URL argument is useful for passing the values from one page to another. See 5.3.2,
“Modify Custom_JS form” on page 71, for a sample usage and more detailed explanation of
&PresetFields.
Setting Last-Modified
&CacheResults (or &CR in Version 7 and later) returns the HTTP Last-Modified response
header set to the last modified design of forms file.
Set maximum expiration time
&MaxExpires (or &MX in Version 7 and later) returns the HTTP Expires response header set
to nearly one year from today to keep the page contents in the browser cache. Setting the
Expires header to a value in the future results in the browser not even asking the server for a
more recent version if this response is already in the browser cache. Reusing static content
from the cache greatly improves client performance, reducing both bandwidth consumed and
server CPU cycles. However, you need to be careful to avoid using stale information. For this
reason, Domino Web Access typically adds an &TimeStamp to avoid this problem. If the
resource changes (for example, a newer forms file is installed on the server), this argument
value would be different and the application would no longer use the stale information in the
cache.
Avoiding stale code or data in the cache
Domino Web Access adds a &TimeStamp (or &TS in Version 7 and later) to avoid using stale
data. The value for the argument is intelligently calculated based on the resource (for
example, static code in the forms file uses the design last modified time of the forms file), so
when the resource changes the value changes, and hence the stale code or data in the cache
is ignored.

Chapter 3. Customization considerations
37
Skin selection
&ui (equals inotes | inotes_lite | portal | portal_lite | webmail) causes the specified skin or
even WebMail to be used for page generation.
For example, if you add &ui=portal to the URL that opens Domino Web Access, it will open
Domino Web Access using portal skin instead of the default inotes skin. If you want this
change to be permanent, you can set this via an INI value to the desired skin, as described in
6.2.3, “New or modified notes.ini variables in Notes and Domino 7” on page 96.
The default also can be set via the personal options of the Domino Web Access redirect
database, as described in 6.3.2, “DWA redirect options” on page 101.
User Name Hash
The parameter &unh=... contains a calculated hash value from the user’s full name. This hash
value is used to avoid collision of user-specific data pages or script that lands in the cache.
For example, Domino Web Access caches the main view pages (as there is no real data in
this page, just the layout html; the view data is retrieved separately). However, there are
variables that specify what level of access the current user has to this page, and that is used
to govern which actions are offered to the current user. If the argument is missing, it is
assumed that there is no user-specific data within this page.
This is an option in terms of customization to be used to control self-developed pages or
externalized scripts to be loaded from the browsercache or not, if the page contains user
specific data.
3.8.4 Special Domino Web Access formulas
In this section we discuss special Domino Web Access formulas.
Formula blocks in HTML and JavaScript
Domino Web Access has a special notation syntax to display and include computed text
blocks. These are noted in the @formula language. Not all @ functions work and some are
available only to Domino Web Access. All formula blocks have to be included in a block like
@{….}.
These formulas appeared Base64 encoded in earlier forms files (Forms5, Forms6) like:
#B64#<base64 results of NSFFormulaCompile>
The output of the formula can contribute to the page, and therefore it may also run output
through special filters:
jsdata: JavaScript variable data (apostrophes are escaped)
html: valid html data
xml: valid xml data (new in Release 7.0.2 and later)
The notation of that would look like @{{...};jsdata;html} and is shown in Example 3-8.
Tip: Making sure that the page returns a proper Last-Modified response header allows for
more efficient processing if the user invokes the browser’s Refresh action or traverses to
the same page again. The browser sends the server an If-Modified-Since GET request in
such scenarios, and the server can very efficiently return Not-Modified if nothing more
recent is available. A user can hold down the Ctrl key and click the browser’s Refresh
action to prevent the browser from sending a conditional GET. This is a good debugging
technique to make sure a problem is not resulting from stale data in the browser cache.

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Domino Web Access 7 Customization
Example 3-8 Sample @formula in Domino Web Access
haiku.CalendarProfileOwnerName = '@{{@Name([Canonicalize];
@GetProfileField("calendarprofile";"Owner"))};jsData}';
Table 3-3 shows the characters quoted by the xml filter.
Table 3-3 Characters qouted by xml filter
The xml filter would be used to properly quote xml element values. Example 3-9 shows how
to use the xml filter in a form.
Example 3-9 Form containing XML
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" ?>
<root>
@{{"abc&<>'\""};xml}
</root>
<NotesDictionary>
<NOTESVAR NAME={$ContentType} VALUE={"text/xml"}>
<NOTESVAR NAME={$CacheControl} VALUE={"no-store"}>
</NotesDictionary>
Special @DBCommand formula
Domino Web Access implements a new @DBCommand formula to deliver a great set of
special functions. These functions include, for example, calls to get current mail database
properties, properties about the current user and mail file, environment settings, profile
document access, and so on.
The general notation for @DBCommand is:
@DbCommand("Haiku"; "<command_name>" [; "Arg1"; "Arg2"; …])
Special character Quoted filter output
& &amp;
< &lt;
> &gt;
'&apos;
"&quot;
Tip: Consider that server-side generated pages as a result of Urls to the forms file which
have &MaxExpires specified are normally cached and therefore the output of the
@formulas are cached as well. “Different techniques to include externalized code” on
page 106 shows a way to create user-specific output like lookups.
Tip: Sometimes it is very useful to investigate existing forms and subforms to learn about
the formulas, the @DBCommand, and the data structures delivered by the calls. Additional
information about a found @DbCommand value might be found within the dwa_tags form.

Chapter 3. Customization considerations
39
@DbCommand("haiku";"h_Vars”) emits all non-system items in a document as JavaScript
vars with values. This command has up to three optional Args:
Arg1: UNID of document in current DB being processed (current document if not
specified)
Arg2: prefix string (string to prepend to each item; useful if you desire to put items as
properties of another javascript object) (default “var “)
Arg 3:
– “1“: Emit all items on current note (default).
– “0”: emit only if specified in a NotesDictionary block.
@DbCommand("haiku";"h_RunAgent”; “Arg1” [; “Arg2”] ) runs the specified agent (which can
contribute to page output). This call has one required and one optional parameter:
Arg 1: Required - Name of agent
Arg 2: Optional
– “1”: Agent is in forms file.
– “0”: Agent is in mail file (default).
@DbCommand("haiku";"h_GetProfileField";"calendarprofile";"Owner") retrieves the value of
the field given as the last parameter from the profile with the form name given as the third
parameter. The example retrieves the value of the field Owner from the profiledocument
calendarprofile.
@DbCommand("Haiku";"h_GetNABName") retrieves the name of the public names and the
address book.
Example 3-10 shows two samples using the @DBCommand formula.
Example 3-10 Usage samples for @DBCommand
<NotesVar>NAME=s_FF INITIALVALUE={@DbCommand("Haiku";"s_GetFormsFile")}
ExcludeFromJSVars=yes>
<NotesVar>Name=s_UNH
INITIALVALUE={@DbCommand("Haiku";"s_Hash";@Name([Abbreviate];@UserName))}>
3.9 Domino Web Access table of contents (TOC)
By default, Lotus Domino Web Access displays six tabs, also called functional areas:
Welcome, Mail, Calendar, ToDo, Contacts, and Notebook. However, you may notice that one
or more tabs are missing in a mail file or the order of these items is different from the default
of Domino Web Access. Even replacing the design of the mail file, this could also not solve
the problem.
This has been observed if the mail files had once inherited from a customized Domino Web
Access template. If you open the hidden
Haiku_TOC
view, you will see that the design
element for the missing tab is not in the list. There might even be design elements for
customized tabs. The design elements cannot be deleted from the Notes Client user interface
(UI). Attempting to do so will give the error #02:41. Neither can design elements be added.

40
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
We suggest that you use an agent to delete those design elements. Example 3-11 shows a
sample LotusScript code that will delete all the design elements. Once done, you can re-add
them by replacing the design of the mail file with the standard Domino Web Access template.
Example 3-11 Lotus script to remove the TOC documents
Dim session As New NotesSession
Dim db As NotesDatabase
Set db = session.CurrentDatabase
Dim view As NotesView
Dim note As NotesDocument
Dim note1 As NotesDocument
Set view = db.GetView( "(Haiku_TOC)" )
Set note = view.GetFirstDocument
Set note1 = view.GetNextDocument(note)
While Not (note Is Nothing)
Call note.Remove(True)
If Not (note1 Is Nothing) Then
Set note = note1
Set note1 = view.GetNextDocument(note)
End If
Wend
The customization of the TOC in terms of hiding functional areas from it should not be
necessary with Domino Web Access 7, because there is a new notes.ini variable introduced
to control the display of the areas displayed in the Domino Web Access browser windows.
For details refer to “Enable and disable functional areas” on page 18 and “iNotes_WA_Areas”
on page 96.
The order of the tabs in the TOC is taken from the order of the proxy documents in the TOC
view in the user’s mail file, normally derived from the dwa7 template. So if the order has been
modified by changing the proxy documents this has to be redone in a Domino Web Access 6
to 7 migration. The description of how to change the order of the TOC tabs in DWA has been
described in Chapter 6 of the IBM Redbook iNotes Web Access Deployment and
Administration, SG24-6518.
3.10 How to edit Domino Web Access Markup
With Version 7 of Domino Web Access the only tool really needed for modification and
customization is Domino Designer:
Forms and subforms: Domino Designer
Images: Domino Designer within shared resources\files
Skin elements: Domino Designer within shared resources\files
To start with skin modifications dive into file resources prefixed with h_ShimmerSkin, but use
the one skin group assigned to the targeted browser. Use the javascript variables
h_CurrentSkinName and h_CurrentSkinType discussed in 4.2, “Modifying the stylesheet” on
page 45, to determine which skin group to edit.

Chapter 3. Customization considerations
41
3.11 Taking customized Domino Web Access offline
The ability to work while disconnected from the network increases the productivity of ITSO
Bank’s mobile employees. Domino Web Access uses Domino Offline Services (DOLS) to take
the mail file offline and gives the disconnected user full fidelity access to Web applications,
like their mail files, via a Web browser.
The Domino Web Access mail template is already DOLS-enabled, so no configuration needs
to be done in order to take the mail file offline. To decrease the performance overhead, the
out-of-box forms7.nsf database is included in the filesets that DOLS downloads to the local
client. So if the forms7.nsf database is being customized there are considerations about
putting these modifications into the fileset. The following steps can be used to replace the
standard Form7.nsf with the customized Forms7.nsf from the pre-packaged fileset
n_SHIMMER7_en.exe. This example is only for the Windows® English DOLS fileset but can
be applied to the LINUX English fileset (l_SHIMMER7_en, l_SHIMMER7_en.inf) and all
supported server languages (n_SHIMMER7_fr.exe, n_SHIMMER7_fr.inf).
The steps are:
1.n_SHIMMER7_en.exe is located under Domino\data\domino\html\download\filesets.
2.n_SHIMMER7_en.exe is a self-extracting executable, so we can unzip it using any zip
application.
3.Replace the standard Forms7.nsf with the customized Form7.nsf underneath the
\data\iNotes folder of the unzipped contents.
4.Maintaining the folder structure, create a new zip file. On Windows XP, one can do this by
selecting eflnl27w.dll and the data folder, followed by the right-clicking Send to →
compressed folder.
5.Convert the above zip file into a self exacting executable and name it
n_SHIMMER7_en.exe.
6.Replace the old n_SHIMMER7_en.exe with the new executable.
7.n_SHIMMER7_en.inf is the versioning file. For existing installs, to push out the new
customized fileset, increment the Version string (for example, the out-of-box Version =
7.0.1.0 so set Version = 7.0.1.100.
Important: Backup n_SHIMMER7_en.exe and n_SHIMMER7_en.inf before making any
changes.
Important: If there is a Domino Web Access hotfix applied to the server, the Version string
might be higher. So be sure to increment the current string by one. That is, 7.0.1.100
becomes 7.0.1.200, and so on.

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Domino Web Access 7 Customization

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2006. All rights reserved.
43
Chapter 4.
Skin customization techniques
ITSO Bank desires their mail user interface to conform to their corporate standard design.
This allows a smooth visual transition as users navigate between Domino Web Access and
other internal applications. Customizations implemented to achieve this look and feel are:
Modifying stylesheet
Modifying h_ShimmerSkin-h_ListFolder
Modifying forms and subforms
Adding a new skin component
Customizing the login screen
4

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Domino Web Access 7 Customization
4.1 Skin customization overview
As discussed in Chapter 3, “Customization considerations” on page 17, most of the design
(HTML, JavaScript, images, and CSS) that contributes to the look and feel of Domino Web
Access resides within the Domino Web Access forms file.
Domino Web Access uses Lotus Quickplace themes technology. This entails having
skin
groups
that represent different
themes
. Each theme is comprised of a set of skins that
represents specific layout templates along with a shared stylesheet. Therefore, to change the
overall look and feel of Domino Web Access, these skins would need to be modified.
Customizations explored in this chapter deal specifically with h_ShimmerSkin, for IE, but can
easily be extended for Mozilla/Firefox (h_ShimmerSkin_Gecko). Within each skin group the
following key skin types are used in the following pages:
h_ListFolder, h_Portal, h_DwaLite, h_PortalLite: Used for most view pages. h_ListFolder
is the default. h_Portal is used if &ui=portal is in effect. h_DwaLite and h_PortalLite are
only used by Forms6 (Version 6.5.5 and later). They are not used in Versions 7.0.0 and
7.01 and are eliminated in Version 7.0.2.
h_MailPage: Used for most object screens.
h_ApptPage: Used by CalendarEntry, ToDo, and Out of Office and Preferences screen
(has a different class specified for the BodyDiv outer div within the main PageContent area
displayed by the PageContent skin component).
To determine which skin to modify examine the h_CurrentSkinName and h_CurrentSkinType
variables to figure out which skin group and skin type is being used. To get to these variables
click the View → Source menu (in Internet Explorer) and see how these variables are
highlighted (Figure 4-1).
Figure 4-1 View → Source
As displayed in Figure 4-1, we can see that the skin group we are dealing with is
h_ShimmerSkin and the skin type is h_ListFolder.
Tip: Most of the color changes can be done by customizing h_ShimmerSkin-h_Stylesheet
with the exception of some minor color changes that can be done in
h_ShimmerSkin-h_ListFolder and s_SessionInfo form.

Chapter 4. Skin customization techniques
45
4.2 Modifying the stylesheet
How do you know which CSS definitions to change in order to change the appearance of an
HTML element? If you examine the HTML that gets generated when you click View → Source
from Internet Explorer, you will find that it does not offer enough details to help you figure out
what to change.
The best tool to use here is either Web Developer or DOM Inspector for Mozilla Firefox or
Developer toolbar for IE. These tools make it much easier to discover the style that applies to
the HTML element. These tools are discussed in detail in Appendix A, “Additional
customization tips” on page 105.
To make modifications to h_ShimmerSkin-h_StyleSheet:
1.From the Domino Designer client, under shared resources → Files, select the file
h_ShimmerSkin-h_StyleSheet and click the Open or Open with button to open the
specified file in an application of your choice. The open options are available as buttons on
top and in the right-click menu.
2.Open the file h_ShimmerSkin-h_StyleSheet using a text editor or a CSS editor.
3.If the application saves the file and closes it, the file resource becomes updated by
Designer.
4.Restart the HTTP server.
– tell http quit
– dbcache flush
– load http
4.2.1 Change the background of the top toolbar
The following steps explain how to change the background of the top toolbar in Domino Web
Access, as displayed in Figure 4-2.
Figure 4-2 Top Toolbar
Modify the style background-color under the .s-toptoolbar-bg, .s-toptoolbar-bg-middle, and
.s-toptoolbar-bg-last classes.
The .stoptoolbar-bg-middle class controls the middle of the toolbar, except for X (IM
Presence status image area) and help.
The border-right style sets the color of the borders separating each button.
The .stoptoolbar-bg-last class controls the X and Help part of the top toolbar.
Important: It is always good development practice to make backups of any database or
design elements you intend to modify in a way that will allow you to reverse any changes.
Original
Modified

46
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
Table 4-1 shows the original and modified .s-toptoolbar-bg, .s-toptoolbar-bg-middle, and
.s-toptoolbar-bg-last classes.
Table 4-1 .Original and modified functions for top toolbar
4.2.2 Change background color of the left panel
To change the background color of the left panel in Domino Web Access, as displayed in
Table 4-3 on page 47, modify the style background-color under the .s-leftpanel class.
Figure 4-3 Left panel
Original Modified
...
.s-toptoolbar-bg {
background-color:#e8e8e8;
}
...
...
.s-toptoolbar-bg {
background-color:#F0F5BE;
}
...
...
.s-toptoolbar-bg-middle {
background-color:#e8e8e8;
border-right: 1px solid #ffffff;
}
...
...
.s-toptoolbar-bg-middle {
background-color:#F0F5BE;
border-right: 1px solid #ffffff;
}
...
.s-toptoolbar-bg-last {
background-color:#e8e8e8;
}
...
...
.s-toptoolbar-bg-last {
background-color:#F0F5BE;
}
...
Original
Modified

Chapter 4. Skin customization techniques
47
Table 4-2 shows the original and modified .s-leftpanel class.
Table 4-2 .s-leftpanel
4.2.3 Change the background color of the view label
To change the view label in Domino Web Access as displayed in Figure 4-4, modify the style
background-color under the .s-view-active and .s-margin classes.
The .s-view-active class controls the background of the view label.
The .s-margin class controls the margin color of the view label.
Figure 4-4 View label
Table 4-3 shows the original and modified .s-view-active and .s-margin classes.
Table 4-3 .s-view-active class
Original Modified
...
.s-leftpanel {
background-color: #dee3ef;
}
...
...
.s-leftpanel {
background-color: #F0F5BE;
}
...
Original Modified
...
.s-view-active {
background-color: #dee3ef;
}
...
...
.s-view-active {
background-color: #F0F5BE;
}
...
...
.s-margin{
border-top:4px solid #dee3ef;
border-bottom:4px solid #dee3ef;
height:100%;
}
...
...
.s-margin{
border-top:4px solid #F0F5BE;
border-bottom:4px solid #F0F5BE;
height:100%;
}
...
Original
Modified

48
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
4.2.4 Change the color of the selected item in the outline
To change the color of the selected item in the outline in Domino Web Access as displayed in
Figure 4-5, modify the style background-color under the .s-outlineCellSelected class.
Figure 4-5 Selected item in outline
Table 4-4 shows the original and modified .s-outlineCellSelected class.
Table 4-4 .s-outlineCellSelected
4.2.5 Change the highlight color in the outline
To change the highlight color in the outline in Domino Web Access as displayed in Figure 4-6,
modify the style background-color for a element of the s-outlineEntry:hover class.
Figure 4-6 Highlight color in the outline
Original Modified
...
.s-outlineCellSelected{
background-color:#dee3ef;
border-left:1px solid #ffffff;
border-right:5px solid #ffffff;
border-top:1px solid #ffffff;
border-bottom:1px solid #ffffff;
}
...
...
.s-outlineCellSelected{
background-color:#F0F5BE;
border-left:1px solid #ffffff;
border-right:5px solid #ffffff;
border-top:1px solid #ffffff;
border-bottom:1px solid #ffffff;
}
...
ModifiedOriginal
Original Modified

Chapter 4. Skin customization techniques
49
Table 4-5 shows the original and modified .a.s-outlineEntry:hover class.
Table 4-5 a.s-outlineEntry:hover
4.2.6 Change the of the Active, Inactive, and highlighted tab
The following steps explain how to change the Active, Inactive, and highlighted tab in Domino
Web Access, as displayed in Figure 4-7.
Figure 4-7 Active, Inactive, and highlighted tabs
Modify the following classes and styles:
1.Under the .s-toc-tab-active class modify style background-color and border-bottom for the
active tab color and border. There is a highlighted border around the active tab in the
same color as the tab. This border color can be modified under the .dm-toca-hyper class.
2.Under the .s-toc-tab-inactive class modify style background-color.
3.Under the .dm-toci-hyper class modifies the border style. This changes the border of the
tab when the mouse hovers over the tab.
Original Modified
...
a.s-outlineEntry:hover{
color:#ffffff;
background-color:#336699;
text-decoration:none;
}
...
...
a.s-outlineEntry:hover{
color:#ffffff;
background-color:black;
text-decoration:none;
}
...
Note: This change will be applied to all tabs: Welcome, Calendar, To Do, Contacts, and
Notebook.
Inactive tab
Original
Active tab
Highlighted tab
Modified

50
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
Table 4-6 shows the original and modified .s-toc-tab-active, .s-toc-tab-inactive, .dm-toci-hyper,
and .dm-toca-hyper

classes.
Table 4-6 .s-toc-tab-active, .s-toc-tab-inactive, and .dm-toci-hyper
4.2.7 Changing the background color for the table of contents toolbar
The following steps explain how to change background color for the table of contents toolbar
in Domino Web Access, as displayed in Figure 4-8.
Figure 4-8 Table of contents
Modify the style background-color under the .s-toc-bar-bg class.
Original Modified
...
.s-toc-tab-active{
background-color:#dee3ef;
border-bottom:1px solid #dee3ef;
}
...
...
.s-toc-tab-active{
background-color:#F0F5BE;
border-bottom:1px solid #F0F5BE;
}
...
...
.s-toc-tab-inactive{
background-color:#adc3d6;
border-bottom:1px solid #000000;
}
...
...
.s-toc-tab-inactive{
background-color:#E8F757;
border-bottom:1px solid #000000;
}
...
...
.dm-toci-hyper{
border:1px solid #acc3d6;
color: #595973;
}
...
...
.dm-toci-hyper{
border:1px solid #E7F845;
color: #595973;
}
...
...
.dm-toca-hyper{
border:1px solid #dfe3ef;
color: #000000;
}
...
...
.dm-toca-hyper{
border:1px solid #F0F5BE;
color: #000000;
}
...
Original
Modified

Chapter 4. Skin customization techniques
51
Table 4-7 shows the original and modified .s-toc-bar-bg class.
Table 4-7 .s-toc-bar-bgl
4.2.8 Change the background color for the action bar
To change background color for the action bar in Domino Web Access as displayed in
Figure 4-9, modify the style background-color under the .dm-actionbar class.
Figure 4-9 Action bar
Table 4-8 shows the original and modified .dm-actionbar class.
Table 4-8 .dm-actionbar
4.2.9 Change the background color of the column header
The following steps explain how to change background color of the column header in Domino
Web Access, as displayed in Figure 4-10.
Figure 4-10 Column header
Original Modified
...
.s-toc-bar-bg {
background-color:#336699;
}
...
...
.s-toc-bar-bg {
background-color:black;
}
...
Original Modified
...
.dm-actionbar{
border-top: 1px solid #4A494A;
border-bottom: 1px solid #808080;
background-color: #E8E8E8;
width: 100%;
padding-top:1px;
padding-left:1px;
}
...
...
.dm-actionbar{
border-top: 1px solid #4A494A;
border-bottom: 1px solid #808080;
background-color: #e8f757;
width: 100%;
padding-top:1px;
padding-left:1px;
}
...
Original
Modified
Original
Modified

52
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
Modify the following classes and styles:
Under .vl-column-header, .ll-column-header class, modify style background-color.
Under .vl-coumn-border, .ll-column-bar class, modify style border-left and border- right.
Table 4-9 shows the original and modified .vl-column-header, .ll-column-header,
.vl-column-bar, and .ll-column-bar

class.
Table 4-9 Column header and border
4.2.10 Change the menu highlight color
To change the menu highlight color in Domino Web Access, as displayed in Figure 4-11,
modify the style background-color for the highlight color and style color for the foreground
color under the .dm-pop-x-hyper-hover class.
Figure 4-11 Menu highlight color
Original Modified
...
.vl-column-header, .ll-column-header{
background-color:#eff3f7;
border-bottom:1px solid #999999;
font-family:verdana,helvetica,arial,sans-serif;
font-size:x-small;
height:1.4em;
white-space:nowrap;
overflow-x:hidden;
position:relative;
left:0px;
top:0px;
z-index:0;
}
...
...
.vl-column-header, .ll-column-header{
background-color:#F3F6D6;
border-bottom:1px solid #999999;
font-family:verdana,helvetica,arial,sans-serif;
font-size:x-small;
height:1.4em;
white-space:nowrap;
overflow-x:hidden;
position:relative;
left:0px;
top:0px;
z-index:0;
}g
...
...
.vl-column-bar, .ll-column-bar{
z-index:1;
background-color:#5a5973;
border-left:2px solid #eff3f7;
border-right:2px solid #eff3f7;
height:1em;
width:5px;
position:absolute;
overflow:hidden;
cursor:default;
}
...
...
.vl-column-bar, .ll-column-bar{
z-index:1;
background-color:#5a5973;
border-left:2px solid #F3F6D6;
border-right:2px solid #F3F6D6;
height:1em;
width:5px;
position:absolute;
overflow:hidden;
cursor:default;
}
...
Original Modified

Chapter 4. Skin customization techniques
53
Table 4-10 shows the original and modified .dm-pop-x-hyper-hover class.
Table 4-10 .dm-actionbar
4.2.11 Change the background color for the message
To change the background color for the message in Domino Web Access, as displayed in
Figure 4-12, modify the style background-color under the .s-form-mail class.
Figure 4-12 New message
Note: The default background-color is set to
highlight
so DWA will use the default
operating system color setting.
Original Modified
...
.dm-pop-x-hyper-hover{
color: highlighttext;
background-color: highlight;
}
...
...
.dm-pop-x-hyper-hover{
color: highlighttext;
background-color: black;
}
...
Note: This modification will apply to opening, creating, replying, and forwarding the
message window.
Original
Modified

54
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
Table 4-11 shows the original and modified .s-form-mail class.
Table 4-11 ..s-form-mail class
4.3 Modifications to h_ShimmerSkin-h_ListFolder
The layout of the DWA Web pages is stored in the skin html files. As we discussed in 4.1,
“Skin customization overview” on page 44, the skintype value in the page source points to
which layout file needs to be modified. All layout files are stored in the Forms7.nsf as file
resources.
To make modifications to h_ShimmerSkin-h_ListFolder:
1.From the Domino Designer client, under shared resources → Files, export
h_ShimmerSkin-h_ListFolder. The export option is available as a button on top and in the
right-click menu.
2.Open h_ShimmerSkin-h_ListFolder using a text editor.
3.Make the required modifications and save the file at your chosen location.
4.Delete the original h_ShimmerSkin-h_ListFolder from the Forms7.nsf database.
5.Create a new resource and select the modified h_ShimmerSkin-h_ListFolder.
6.Restart the HTTP server.
a.tell http quit
b.dbcache flush
c.load http
4.3.1 Change the background color around the arrow on the divider
To change the background color around the arrow on the divider in Domino Web Access as
displayed in Figure 4-13, modify the bgcolor attribute of the s-leftpanel-divider class.
Figure 4-13 Background color around the arrow
Tip: The style background-color can be set to a color like #FOF5BE or it can be set to a
window that will pick up the color from the user’s workstation settings under Control
Panel → Display Properties → Appearance → Advanced Appearance → window.
Original Modified
...
.s-form-mail {
padding:6px;
background-color: #dee3ef;
width: 100%;
height:100%;
}
...
...
.s-form-mail {
padding:6px;
background-color: window;
width: 100%;
height:100%;
}
...
Original Modified

Chapter 4. Skin customization techniques
55
Table 4-12 shows the original and modified s-leftpanel-divider class.
Table 4-12 Original and modified s-leftpanel-divider class
4.3.2 Move search next to preferences
The following steps explain how to move the search next to preferences in Domino Web
Access, as displayed in Figure 4-14.
1.In order to move a skin component, the search bar, from the original place below the ITSO
bank logo to above the tools menu, search the code for the string
quicksearch
. The code
of the QuickSearch SkinComponent should be found in the file highlighted in Example 4-1
directly after the usageindicator SkinComponent.
Figure 4-14 Search skin component customization
Example 4-1 h_ShimmerSkin-h_ListFolder HTML original code fragment
...
<td class="s-view-title s-view-subtitle" valign="middle" align="right" nowrap>
<InsertNotesSubForm name="UsageIndicator_SkinComponent">
</td>
</tr></table></span></td>
<td id="SearchBin" valign="middle" width=150 nowrap style="padding-top:4px;"
align="left">
<InsertNotesSubForm name="QuickSearch_SkinComponent">
</td>
</tr>
</table>
...
Original Modified
...
<td class="s-leftpanel-divider" width="9"
height="100%" valign="middle"
align="center" bgcolor="#dee3ef">
<table height="100%" valign="middle"
align="center">
<tr><td height="50%">&nbsp;</td></tr>
<tr><td height="10px" valign="middle"
align="center" bgcolor="#dee3ef">
...
...
<td class="s-leftpanel-divider" width="9"
height="100%" valign="middle"
align="center" bgcolor="#F0F5BE">
<table height="100%" valign="middle"
align="center">
<tr><td height="50%">&nbsp;</td></tr>
<tr><td height="10px" valign="middle"
align="center" bgcolor="#F0F5BE">
...
Original
Modified

56
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
2.Cut the whole HTML table cell including the enclosing <td></td> tags and insert it directly
after the HTML table cell of the Help SkinComponent, as shown in Example 4-2.
Example 4-2 Insertion point after the last table cell of the tools menu
...
<td class="s-toptoolbar-text s-toptoolbar-bg-last" nowrap>
<InsertNotesSubForm name="Help_SkinComponent">
</td>
Insert QuickSearch SkinComponent here
...
3.After that delete the content of the old QuickSearch SkinComponent table cell, but keep
the table cell to prevent breaking the table layout.
4.3.3 Remove trash icon
The following steps explain how to remove the trash icon in Domino Web Access, as
displayed in Figure 4-15. The motivation of ITSO Bank was to have only one trash icon
displayed. But think of the different areas that do not have a trash icon in the outline areas and
also that this one removed here is an animated trash bin, showing whether there is something
in the trash.
1.Removing the trash icon requires the same steps as moving a SkinComponent. First, find
the right SkinComponent by looking for the HTML structure and removing the appropriate
code.
Figure 4-15 DWA page without the Trash bin icon
2.In h_ShimmerSkin-h_ListFolder searching for
Trash
should lead to the code shown in
Example 4-3.
Example 4-3 Locate trashicon skin component
...
<tr>
<td id="TrashBin" valign="top" width=150 nowrap style="padding-top:4px;"
align="center">
<InsertNotesSubForm name="Trash_SkinComponent">
Important: Sometimes it is very important to keep the empty table cell to prevent
breaking the table structure. In this example it is not needed to keep the empty cell.
Eventually it is required to put a nonbreaking space placeholder character (HTML code
&nbsp;) into the table cell.
Original Modified

Chapter 4. Skin customization techniques
57
</td>
</tr>
...
3.In this case, leaving an empty HTML cell instead of removing the whole cell is the best
decision. The resulting code is shown in Example 4-4.
Example 4-4 h_ShimmerSkin-h_ListFolder code without Trash SkinComponent
...
<tr>
<td>
</td>
</tr>
...
4.4 Modifying forms and subforms
ITSO Bank corporate logo changes are controlled by the Custom_banner subform and
AboutBox forms. Also, some look and feel customizations are made in the s_SessionInfo
form, as shown in the following sections.
4.4.1 Change banner to company logo
The following steps explain how to change the default banner to the ITSO Bank company
logo in Domino Web Access, as displayed in Figure 4-16.
1.Under Shared Resource → Files, create a new file resource for itso.gif.
Figure 4-16 Banner
2.Under Shared Code → Subforms, modify the Custom_Banner subform to point at the
itso.gif. Change the width and height dimension so the graphic is not stretched or
compressed out of proportion. The tooltip can also be adjusted by modifying the title
value.
Table 4-13 shows the original and modified Custom_Banner subform.
Table 4-13 Custom_Banner subform
Original Modified
<script>
SV('<div id="ProductLogo"><img
alt="About Domino Web Access..." ti-
tle="About Domino Web Access..."
width="210" height="26"
src="'+BYp("dwa-logo_7.gif")+'"></div>
');
</script>
<script>
SV('<div id="ProductLogo"><img
alt="About Domino Web Access..." ti-
tle="About mail file..." width="250"
height="30" src="'+BYp("it-
so.gif")+'"></div>');
</script>
Original
Modified

58
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
4.4.2 Change the About information box to display company logo
The following steps explain how to change the About information box to display the ITSO
Bank logo in Domino Web Access, as displayed in Figure 4-17.
1.From Designer Client, open Forms → AboutBox.
Figure 4-17 About box
2.Search for AboutBanner.gif and replace it with the graphic. In this case ITSOBanner.gif is
used.
Table 4-14 shows the original and modified AboutBox form.
Table 4-14 Before and after AboutBox form
4.4.3 Modifications to s_SessionInfo form
In the s_SessionInfo form, there is an array of special colors that controls the colors for
various design elements.
1.To access this array, open the s_SessionInfo form in Designer client. Once the form is
open, search for sTmp2=, as shown in Example 4-5.
Example 4-5 sTmp2 array
...
var sTmp2="#dee3ef, #adc3d6, #336699, #ffffff, #e0e0e0, #000000, #ffffff, #e8e8e8,
#eff3f7, #cc3300, tan, darktan, #999999, #f6f3e2, #dee3ef";
...
2.Table 4-15 shows the mapping of elements to index.
Table 4-15 Mapping elements to array index
Note: The size of ITSOBanner.gif is the same as AboutBanner.gif — 640 x 512.
Original Modified
...
<tr><td colspan=3
style="padding:0;border-bottom: black
1px solid"><img
src="@{s_FF}/AboutBanner.gif?OpenFileR
esource&MX"></td></tr>
...
...
<tr><td colspan=3
style="padding:0;border-bottom: black
1px solid"><img
src="@{s_FF}/ITSOBanner.gif?OpenFileRe
source&MX"></td></tr>
...
Original
Modified
Element Array index
Active Tab Background 0

Chapter 4. Skin customization techniques
59
3.For ITSO bank requirements, we are modifying the background color highlight for a
selected message (index 2) and sorted column color (index 14). Figure 4-18 shows the
original and modified page design.
Figure 4-18 Background color for highlighted messages and sorted column color
4.Table 4-16 shows the original and modified sTmp2 array.
Table 4-16 sTmp2 array in
s
_SessionInfo form
Inactive Tab 1
Highlight Background 2
Highlight Text 3
Drop down manager -- Selected Background 4
Drop down manager -- Selected Text 5
Even row background for list 6
Odd row background for list 7
Column header background 8
Hypertext hover (used by outline) 9
Active GifName 10
Inactive GifName 11
Actionbar border color 12
Sorted contacts column color 13
Sorted column list color 14
Original Modified
...
var sTmp2="#dee3ef, #adc3d6, #336699, #ffffff,
#e0e0e0, #000000, #ffffff, #e8e8e8, #eff3f7,
#cc3300, tan, darktan, #999999, #f6f3e2,
#dee3ef";
...
...
var sTmp2="#dee3ef, #adc3d6, #000000, #ffffff,
#e0e0e0, #000000, #ffffff, #e8e8e8, #eff3f7,
#cc3300, tan, darktan, #999999, #f6f3e2,
#f0f5be
...
Element Array index
Original
Modified

60
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
4.5 Adding a new skin component
The most challenging part of modifying the skin layout is to add new skin components. This
requires adding new code. In this section we add a new skin component to display the
remaining space in the mail file. This skin component will only display when the mail file quota
is implemented.
Figure 4-19 New skin component shown in DWA
The steps are:
1.The first step is to implement the JavaScript code to calculate and display the value in an
appropriate format. To implement this code as a new SkinComponent, we need to create a
new subform named
AvailSize_SkinComponent
. The code needed for the calculation is
shown in Example 4-6.
Example 4-6 JavaScript code for AvailSize_SkinComponent
<NotesDictionary>
<NOTESVAR name=s_DBQuotaSize type=TextList
initialValue={@DbCommand("Haiku";"h_GetDBQuotaSize")}>
</NotesDictionary>
<Script>
var ib_dbqs=s_DBQuotaSize;
var ib_array = ib_dbqs.split(",");
var ib_as = parseInt(ib_array[0]);
var ib_qs = parseInt(ib_array[1]);
var ib_avail = Math.round((ib_qs - ib_as)/1024);
if (ib_avail > -1) {document.write(ib_avail + " MB space left");};
</script>
Restriction: Since we cache the top-level view page, adding the quota calculation to the
main page is not ideal. This will be cached and become stale. The DWA quota
implementation suffered from same issue and has been overhauled in Version 7.0.2.
For an example this might be OK, but we wanted to make sure that you were aware of this
type of problem. A way to make the implementation more robust is to introduce a XML
subform that returns the quota information and have the skincomponent retrieve it via a
XMLHttpRequest request.
Original
Modified

Chapter 4. Skin customization techniques
61
2.Since the subform has been saved to the forms7.nsf database, it can be used in the
h_ShimmerSkin-h_ListFolder skin. Example 4-7 shows the h_ShimmerSkin-h_ListFolder
HTML code with the inserted table cell for displaying the new skin component. Since the
output is being written into the document at the place where the SkinComponent is
inserted, there has to be enclosing table cell tags <td></td> around the skin component.
Example 4-7 h_ListFolder skin with new AvailSize_SkinComponent
...
<td class="s-view-title s-view-subtitle" valign="middle" align="right" nowrap>
<InsertNotesSubForm name="UsageIndicator_SkinComponent">
</td>
<td class="s-view-title s-view-subtitle" valign="middle" align="right" nowrap>
<InsertNotesSubForm name="AvailSize_SkinComponent">
</td>
</tr>
...
4.6 Corporate Login screen
The IBM Redbook Domino Web Access 6.5 on Linux, SG24-7060, shows how to customize
the main logo on the redirection page in the Domino Web Access redirection template. The
following sections show how the whole login screen could be customized for representing the
corporate design and adding other functionality.
The following examples show how to customize the login page to display:
Corporate logo
Adding functionality to display weekday, date, and time
4.6.1 Corporate logo
To display the corporate logo it should be imported as an image resource to the iwaredir.ntf
template in an appropriate size. In this example we use a custom logo previously used for the
About Information box. The size of ITSOBanner.gif is 519x32 pixel.
Figure 4-20 shows the ITSO Bank custom logo and its insertion as an image resource.
Figure 4-20 ITSObank banner
Attention: Skins are not language-specific, so any implementation should avoid placing
user-visible text directly within a skin, as done in this example. Rather, this is placed within
skin components or subforms. If customization is for only one language, user-visible text
may be placed within the skin.

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Domino Web Access 7 Customization
This has to be imported as an image resource, as shown in Figure 4-21.
Figure 4-21 Imported itsobanner.gif in Domino Designer
Now the image resource can be used and referenced in the DWALoginPage form, which is
used to display the login dialog in the browser, as shown in Figure 4-22.
Figure 4-22 Corporate Login screen

Chapter 4. Skin customization techniques
63
Figure 4-23 shows the code extract of the DWALoginForm form in Domino Designer referring
to the new image resource.
Figure 4-23 Domino Designer showing computed text for the modified image resource
4.6.2 Adding functionality to display weekday, date, and time
In order to add some convenient functionality, like including the actual weekday, date, and
time on the login form, a modification to the DWALoginForm form has to be done. First find
the paragraph in DWALoginPage that holds the table cell with the corporate logo, as shown in
Figure 4-23. Then insert the JavaScript code provided in Example 4-8 as a whole new table
row.
Example 4-8 JavaScript code for this example
...
<tr>
<td style="font-weight:bold;"><script language="javascript">
<!--
var Dateval = new (Date);
document.write(Dateval.toLocaleString());
//-->
</script>
</td>
</TR>
...

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Domino Web Access 7 Customization
After refreshing the http task the login page should look like Figure 4-24.
Figure 4-24 DWA login page with date and time shown

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2006. All rights reserved.
65
Chapter 5.
Feature customization
techniques
This chapter shows how to implement the various changes needed for the ITSO Bank
scenario. ITSO Bank is implementing a simplified e-mail management compliance process by
storing a copy of all outgoing mail messages in a repository database. In this example the
Redpaper team utilizes a Domino database as the repository. However, in the real world the
repository choices are virtually limitless — it can be a document management system,
relational database, content management system, and so on.
For our example customization, we perform the following:
Overwrite an existing action menu.
Remove an action menu.
Add a new action menu.
Add a custom dialog page.
Add a custom main page, with the ability to view, edit, and create.
Modify preferences.
5

66
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
5.1 Implementation overview
Before getting into the details on how to perform these actions, let us examine an overview of
the ITSO Bank customization, as displayed in Figure 5-1.
Figure 5-1 ITSO Bank customization overview
From Figure 5-1, you can see that we have added the following new design elements to the
forms file (forms7.nsf):
Form: Custom_HeaderInfo
Subform: Custom_HeaderInfoFields
Subform: Custom_HeaderInfoFieldsHTML
Subform: s_AccountReadCode
Subform: s_AccountEditCode
Subform: s_AccountDictionary
Subform: s_AccountRead_Init
Subform: s_AccountEdit_Init
Form: s_AccountRead
Form: s_AccountEdit
And we have modified the following design elements from the forms file:
Form: Custom_JS
Form: Custom_Banner
Subform: s_MailMemoDictionary
Subform: s_MailMemoEdit
Additionally, we have added a new agent in the mail template file Agent: QSMailStoreAgent.
mail7.ntf
dwa7.ntf
Fully Inherits
mail/User.nsf
New:
QSMailStoreAgent
iNotes/Forms7.nsf
Inherits
repository.nsf
DWA Page
Store outgoing mail
References
Modified:
Custom_JB
Custom_Banner
s_MailMemoDictionary
s_MailMemoEdit
New:
Custom_HeaderInfo
Custom_HeaderInfoFields
Custom_HeaderinfoFieldsHTML
s_AccountReadCode
s_AccountEditCode
S_AccountDictionary
s_AccountRead_Init
s_AccountEdit_Init
S_AccountRead
S_AccountEdit

Chapter 5. Feature customization techniques
67
Finally, we have created a Domino database (repository.nsf) that will act as the repository in
this example implementation. Copies of outgoing messages will be stored in this database.
5.2 Domino Web Access functions for Action menu operations
Before getting into hands-on examples for manipulating action menus, let us examine some
of the helpful JavaScript functions that are available in Domino Web Access 7.0.1.
5.2.1 DM_getMenuByPos
This action gives you the handle to the menu node object using the menu position as the
parameter.
Obfuscated name: Dap
Parameters:
– p1 = branch ID
– p2 = position
5.2.2 DM_getMenuById
This action gives you the handle to the menu node object using the menu node ID as the
parameter.
Obfuscated name: DPN
Parameters:
– p1 = menu node or node ID
5.2.3 DM_getMenuByLabel
This function gives you the handle to the menu node object using the label as the parameter.
Obfuscated name: CyE
Parameters: DM_getMenuByLabel(p1,p2)
– p1 = tree ID
– p2 = menu label
5.2.4 DM_removeMenu
Given a menu ID, this function removes the menu item.
Obfuscated name: DGa
Parameter: DM_removeMenu(p1)
– p1 = menu node or node ID
5.2.5 DM_newMenu
This action creates a new menu item. It adds the item to the action bar as well as to the
right-click menu.
Obfuscated name: Dbc
Parameters: DM_newMenu(p1,p2,p3)
– p1 = container ID, can be node or branch ID
– p2 = unique ID (optional)

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Domino Web Access 7 Customization
– p3 = boolean value indicating whether this is the default action on ENTER press
(optional)
5.2.6 DM_getParentNode
This action returns the parent node.
Obfuscated name: DRo
Parameters:
– p1 = menu node object or node ID
5.2.7 DM_getChildNodes
This action returns an array of child nodes.
Obfuscated name: DIh
Parameters:
– p1 = menu node object or node ID
5.2.8 DM_updateActionBar
This action updates the action bar after a change to the label, icon, or disabled status.
Obfuscated name: CzB
Parameters:
– None
5.2.9 DM_getSubmenuItem
This action returns a menu object (not the html, but the data) by its ID.
Obfuscated name: Cwo
Parameters:
– p1 = branch ID
– p2 = submenu level
– p3 = context (optional, the value is either “actionState” or “contextState”)
5.2.10 DM_createContextMenu
This action assigns an oncontextmenu event handler to the specified HTML element. The
specified menu tree will be shown.
Obfuscated name: DWh
Parameters:
– p1 = HTML element ID
– p2 = branch ID to show
– p3 = callback function when context menu is about to show

Chapter 5. Feature customization techniques
69
5.2.11 DM_getBranch
This action returns an ordered array of the specified menu node object's siblings.
Obfuscated name: DZo
Parameters:
– p1 = menu node or node ID
– p2 = return sorted array
– p3 = state, can be null
5.3 Overwrite New Message action
ITSO Bank requires their employees to add header information to outgoing mail messages
prior to sending them. This is accomplished by overwriting the Domino Web Access New
Message action so that it prompts the employees to populate the header information via a
dialog box (see Figure 5-2) before displaying the Domino Web Access new message page.
Figure 5-2 Header Information dialog box
The following steps are necessary for accomplishing this task:
Create Custom_HeaderInfo form, a new dialog page.
Modify Custom_JS form.
Modify the s_MailMemoDictionary subform.
Modify the s_MailMemoEdit subform.
5.3.1 Create a new dialog page
In order to create a new dialog page, you must create a custom form in the forms file. We
recommend that you start with a form in forms7.nsf that implements an existing modal dialog
box, such as s_DeliveryOptions. You should keep the majority of the head portion and modify
the body portion to fit your purposes.
It is important to keep the head portion of this form because these dialogs bring in certain
common external script files that may change from release to release of Domino Web
Access, and are typically brought in via some server-side evaluated @formulas. Additionally,
various releases emit the script tags in different ways. Earlier releases emitted them via
specific <script …></script> tags on the page. Newer releases have started emitting these via
script as well, further reducing the size of the various pages. But they rely on various other
JavaScript globals as well, located within the <head>…</head> section of the page.
Starting with a copy and retaining the majority of the head portion and modifying the body
portion allows you to leverage the same modal dialog box foundation used within other modal
dialog boxes in Domino Web Access.

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Domino Web Access 7 Customization
We have created a new form called Custom_HeaderInfo based on the s_DeliveryOptions
form and modified the body portion, as in Example 5-1.
Example 5-1 Body portion of Custom_HeaderInfo dialog
<FORM NAME="s_HeaderInfo">
<script>
var theForm=document.forms['s_HeaderInfo'];
var IF="H_REQUESTING_A_DELIVERY_REPORT_STEPS_01.html";</script>
</script>
<table border="0" width="250" style="margin-left:5px;margin-right:5px;">
<tr>
<td width="30%">&nbsp;</td>
<td align="right"><a onclick="javascript:OE(IF)"><img
src="@{s_FF}/help.gif?OpenFileResource&MX" border="0"></a></td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td class="s-form-label" width="30%">Category:</td>
<td>
<select class="s-form-input" name="DOC_CATEGORY" style="width:100%">
<option>Checking Account</option>
<option>Saving Account</option>
<option>Loan</option>
</select>
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td class="s-form-label">Type:</td>
<td>
<select class="s-form-input" name="DOC_TYPE" style="width:100%">
<option>Comment</option>
<option>Complaint</option>
<option>Information</option>
<option>Other</option>
</select>
</td>
</tr>
<tr><td width="100%" colspan="2">
<table border="0" cellspacing="3" cellpadding="1" width="100%">
<tr>
<td width="50%">&nbsp;</td>
<td width="25%" align="right">
<input class="s-form-button" type="button" id="HeaderDataBtnOK"
onclick="BDA('OK')" value="OK" style="width:100%">
</td>
<td width="25%" align="left">
<input class="s-form-button" type="button" id="HeaderDataBtnCancel"
onclick="BDA('Cancel')" value="Cancel" style="width:100%">
</td>
</tr>
</table>
</td></tr>
</table>
<script language="JavaScript">
function dJ(){
self.returnValue=false;

Chapter 5. Feature customization techniques
71
}
function BDA(yX){
if (yX == "OK") {
var ID = window.dialogArguments;
var field = theForm.DOC_CATEGORY;
ID.DCat = field.options[field.selectedIndex].text;
var field = theForm.DOC_TYPE;
ID.DType = field.options[field.selectedIndex].text;
self.returnValue=true;
}
else
self.returnValue=false;
self.close();
}
</script>
</FORM>
</body></html>
ITSO Bank implements a simple dialog box with no lookup for its selection lists. For a more
complex dialog box sample that includes lookup and demonstrates how the lookup is cached,
refer to the IBM DeveloperWorks article titled “Manipulating Data in Domino Web Access” at:
http://www-128.ibm.com/developerworks/lotus/library/dwa-data/
This article also shows you how to add a new online help content. Since we used the Delivery
Options form as the starting point, the question mark icon(?) in the ITSO Bank Header
Information dialog box (Figure 5-2 on page 69) brings up the online help for delivery options.
To change the target for the help function replace the IF Variable value
(IF="H_REQUESTING_A_DELIVERY_REPORT_STEPS_01.html";) with the value of the
html document target in the Domino Web Access help database or just empty the value to
point to the default help entry point. “Creating a custom help document in the Domino Web
Access help database” on page 106 describes how to create a custom help document.
5.3.2 Modify Custom_JS form
Now, let us see how we overwrite the New Message action menu. Action menu operations
(add, remove, re-order, overwrite) are done by modifying the Scene_Actions function in the
Custom_JS form. Scene_Actions is called just before the action buttons are added to the
action bar.
Example 5-2 Overwrite New Message action in Version 7.0.1
function Scene_Actions( s_SceneName, o_Window, s_TopBranchId ){
...
switch (s_SceneName) {
case 'Mail':
var menuNode;
//Overwrite the "New" action
menuNode = CyE(s_TopBranchId, "New");
menuNode.onclick = "javascript:showHeaderDialog()";
var a_NewBranchId = menuNode.$branchId;
//Overwrite the "New\Message" action

72
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
menuNode = CyE(a_NewBranchId, "Message");
menuNode.onclick = "javascript:showHeaderDialog()";
break;
default:
break;
}
...
}
Action menu operations is one of the areas where customization is vastly improved in Domino
Web Access 7 as compared to the earlier version. Notice how much more intuitive the menu
structure in Version 7.0.1 (see Example 5-2 on page 71) is as compared to how it was in
Version 6.5 (see “Wrapper functions for action menu operations” on page 116). In Version
7.0.1, you can use the new functions for action menu operations (see 5.2, “Domino Web
Access functions for Action menu operations” on page 67) to get the handle to the menu
object. Once you get the handle to the menu object, you can easily overwrite its methods and
properties. In Version 6.5, you have to understand the structure of the menu in order to
overwrite it.
ITSO Bank is only concerned with action menu operations in the Mail tab (s_SceneName =
‘Mail’). Table 5-1 provides a listing of other scenes in Domino Web Access that you might
consider working with.
Table 5-1 Scene names mapping
Scene name Description
Welcome Welcome tab
Calendar Calendar tab
ToDo To Do tab
Contacts Contacts tab
Notebook Notebook tab
s_MailMemo Memo, reply, forward, stationery
s_MailPhoneMessage Phone message entry
s_Appointment Calendar entry
s_ToDo To do entry
s_Contact Contact entry
s_Group Group document
s_NotebookPage Notebook entry
s_OutOfOffice Out of office setup
Tip: You can discover which scene you are working with by using the JavaScript alert
statement to the Scene_Actions function (in Custom_JS form) to display the value of
s_SceneName with a JavaScript statement like alert(s_SceneName).

Chapter 5. Feature customization techniques
73
As described in Example 5-2 on page 71, the New Message action menu onclick event is
replaced with the javascript:showHeaderDialog() statement. This function (see Example 5-3)
uses Internet Explorer's window.showModalDialog DOM method to display the custom dialog
box. Domino Web Access implements something comparable for Gecko, so this will work on
Firefox and Mozilla as well. Using this function, the dialog box automatically behaves as a
modal dialog.
ITSO Bank employees must select a document category and type (from the dialog box) and
click the OK button in order to proceed with composing a new message. If they click the
Cancel button, they will not be able to compose the memo.
Example 5-3 showHeaderDialog function
function showHeaderDialog() {
//
// this function displays a dialogbox prior to composing a new message
//
var ID = new Object;
// The Header Information dialogbox is not a main page,
// you can see that we override the form using &Form=Custom_HeaderInfo
// so that it uses the form specified instead of h_PageUI
var shref = lT(self) +
'/iNotes/Proxy/?OpenDocument&Form=Custom_HeaderInfo&l=en@{@If(s_Charset="";"";"&ch
arset=" + s_Charset)}';
var lI = window.showModalDialog(shref, ID,
"dialogWidth:300px;dialogHeight:175px;dialogTop:200px;dialogLeft:200px;help:no;sta
tus:no;center:no;");
// We are passing the values of document category and type
// through the &PresetFields, which is the third argument
// of the openNewShimmerDoc function
if (lI) { //User clicks OK
var str_preset = 'DOC_CATEGORY;' + encodeURIComponent(ID.DCat) +
',DOC_TYPE;' + encodeURIComponent(ID.DType);
openNewShimmerDoc('($Drafts)','Memo',str_preset);
}
}

74
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
The showHeaderDialog function utilizes an ID object, which returns the values selected from
the dialog box. After the ITSO Bank employee clicks the OK button, it makes a call to the
Domino Web Access openNewShimmerDoc function. The values returned by the ID object
(document category and type) are passed to the newly composed memo document using
&PresetFields (see Figure 5-3). Notice how the URL of the new message has the information
about the custom fields in Figure 5-3.
Figure 5-3 New message
5.3.3 Modify s_MailMemoDictionary subform
In order for the header information fields (document category and document type) to persist in
the memo document, we need to add <NOTESFIELD> definitions for those two fields (see
Example 5-4) in the s_MailMemoDictionary subform.
As discussed in 1.5.2, “Isolate your custom code” on page 7, we recommend that anytime
you modify existing Domino Web Access forms or subforms, you should separate your
changes from Domino Web Access code. One way to do so is by putting your custom
modifications into a subform (see Example 5-4) and insert your custom subform in the
Domino Web Access form or subform to modify.
Example 5-4 Custom _HeaderInfoFields
<NotesDictionary>
<NOTESFIELD NAME={DOC_CATEGORY}>
<NOTESFIELD NAME={DOC_TYPE}>
<NOTESVAR NAME={$$QuerySaveAgent} TYPE={Text} INITIALVALUE={"QSMailStoreAgent"}>
</NotesDictionary>

Chapter 5. Feature customization techniques
75
In order to insert the subform, you will add the following statement at the beginning of the
s_MailMemoDictionary subform:
<InsertNotesSubform NAME={Custom_HeaderInfoFields}>
5.3.4 Modify s_MailMemoEdit subform
In addition to the <NOTESFIELD> tags, Domino Web Access also needs the HTML
representation of the fields as a way to obtain the values selected by ITSO Bank employees
via the dialog box.
Here is another implementation of the best practices by separating the custom HTML fields in
the Custom_HeaderInfoFieldsHTML subform (see Example 5-5).
This subform is inserted into the beginning of the s_MailMemoEdit subform using the
following statement:
<InsertNotesSubForm NAME={Custom_HeaderInfoFieldsHTML}>
Example 5-5 Custom_HeaderInfoFieldsHTML
<input type="hidden" name="DOC_CATEGORY" value="@{DOC_CATEGORY}" />
<input type="hidden" name="DOC_TYPE" value ="@{DOC_TYPE}" />
QuerySaveAgent
As part of its e-mail management compliance process, ITSO Bank will store copies of all
outgoing e-mail messages in a custom Domino database (repository.nsf). We implement the
QuerySave agent (see Example 5-6) to accomplish this. This agent will be invoked before the
message is sent out. Unlike other design changes that take place in the forms file,
QueryOpen and QuerySave agents must reside in the mail template.
In order to enable QueryOpen and QuerySave agents in Domino Web Access, add the
following line to the server’s notes.ini file:
iNotes_WA_QueryAgents=1
Additionally, you will have to create a <NOTESVAR> for $$QuerySaveAgent in the
s_MailMemoDictionary subform (see Example 5-4 on page 74).
Example 5-6 QSMailStoreAgent agent
Sub Initialize
Dim session As New NotesSession
Dim db As NotesDatabase
Dim doc As NotesDocument
Dim repository_db As NotesDatabase
Dim repository_doc As NotesDocument
Set db = session.CurrentDatabase
Set doc = session.DocumentContext
'Get the handle to the repository database
Set repository_db = New NotesDatabase(db.Server, "repository.nsf")
If Not (repository_db.IsOpen) Then
Messagebox "Cannot open the repository database!", 48, "Error"
Exit Sub
End If

76
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
'Store a copy of the message in the repository
Set repository_doc = repository_db.CreateDocument
Call doc.CopyAllItems(repository_doc)
Call repository_doc.Save(True, True)
End Sub
Figure 5-4 shows a sample repository entry, which displays a copy of the message and the
additional header fields.
If desired, you can also add a callback function to handle the error more gracefully. For
example, instead of simply printing the error out at the server console (or log) when the
repository database is not found, you could prompt the user with the error messagebox
instead.
Refer to the IBM DeveloperWorks article titled “Manipulating Data in Domino Web Access” at
the following Web site for more details:
http://www-128.ibm.com/developerworks/lotus/library/dwa-data/
Figure 5-4 Mail Repository entry

Chapter 5. Feature customization techniques
77
5.4 Remove Action Tools → Block Mail from Sender
ITSO Bank does not want its employees to filter any incoming messages and has decided to
remove the Block Mail from Sender menu from the Tools action. We accomplish this by
adding the javascript code described in Example 5-7 to the Custom_JS form.
Again, we can see here how easy it is to remove action menus in Version 7.0.1 as compared
to how it was done in Version 6.5 (see “Removing action menu in Version 6.5” on page 116).
You can also see examples of removing action menus in Version 7.0.1 utilizing wrapper
functions there.
Example 5-7 Remove Tools → Block Mail from Sender action menu
function Scene_Actions( s_SceneName, o_Window, s_TopBranchId ){
...
switch(s_SceneName) {
case 'Mail':
// Remove the "Tools\Block Mail from Sender" action
var toolsNode = CyE(s_TopBranchId, "Tools");
var bmsNode = CyE(toolsNode.$branchId,"Block Mail from Sender");
DGa(bmsNode.$id);
break;
}
...
}
5.4.1 Add Action New → Account
ITSO Bank wants to streamline some of its daily processes by allowing their employees to
create a new account directly from the mailboxes. Copies of the newly created account
information is stored in the employees’ mailboxes and a back-end process will add the newly
created accounts to the main account database. In our sample, we will not include the
back-end implementation.
Example 5-8 demonstrates how to modify Custom_JS in order to create a new action menu in
Domino Web Access. The equivalent code for the previous Version 6.5 as well as the wrapper
functions in Version 7.0.1 are displayed in “Adding new action menu in Version 6.5” on
page 124.
Example 5-8 illustrates the usage of the addAction function call.
Example 5-8 Add New → Account action menu
function Scene_Actions( s_SceneName, o_Window, s_TopBranchId ){
...
switch(s_SceneName) {
case 'Mail':
menuNode = CyE(s_TopBranchId, "New");
var a_NewBranchId = menuNode.$branchId;

78
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
...
//Add a menu under the "New" action
menuNode = Dbc(a_NewBranchId);
with (menuNode) {
pos = 999;
label = "Account";
onclick = "javascript:openNewShimmerDoc('($ToDo)','Account')";
DFB = "Creates a new account form";
}
}
...
}
5.5 Add a new form, ccount
The following actions show how to add a new main page to Domino Web Access. To perform
that several steps need to be done:
1.Create a new form in Domino Designer.
2.Test the form in the Notes client.
3.Add the Formsmap form to forms7.nsf.
4.Create the forms mapping document.
5.Add the forms and subforms for the dictionary, edit, and read scenes.
5.5.1 Create a new form in Designer
Creating a form in the Notes client is not really necessary if the new form is used for Domino
Web Access only. However, there are some cases where a new form is useful:
If the form has to be accessed from the Notes client as well as Domino Web Access.
A form is an easy way to create test data.
A form allows you to inspect documents via the Notes client.
Domino Web Access does not really care if there is such a form in the mail file. It only cares
about the forms map table to know which field in the Domino Web Access form has to be
stored and read from which field in the backend form.
For the example shown in this chapter a new account form in the mail file is used here. The
Notes form has five fields:
Account#
Account Type
Lastname
Firstname
Internal Contact
Note: The only place that Domino Web Access relies on a Notes form is in the Forward
any document object functionality, where the WebEngine's render to form capability is used
to construct HTML to forward the document by mail.

Chapter 5. Feature customization techniques
79
Figure 5-5 shows this simple form in Domino Designer.
Figure 5-5 New account form in Designer
5.5.2 Create document in Notes client
To test the newly created form, create a new document with the form in the Notes client. This
form should be displayed correctly and also the document should be readable after it is
saved. If a view is needed to select the documents created with the new form it should also
be built now. If all forms and views are built into the dwa7.ntf template they can be used with
Domino Web Access easily.
5.5.3 Add the FormsMap form to forms7.nsf
To map the Notes form to a Domino Web Access form definition later, a mapping document is
needed in forms7.nsf. This forms mapping document needs to be defined with a form called
FormsMap in the forms7.nsf, which is not included in the product. Figure 5-6 shows the
definition for the fields needed for this form.
Figure 5-6 FormsMap form definition in Designer

80
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
5.5.4 Create the FormsMap mapping document
After adding the formsmap form the mapping document can be created. Creating the
mapping defines several parameters for the mapping. Figure 5-7 shows the mapping
document.
The edit scene
The read scene
The Notes form name
The subform prefix
Figure 5-7 FormsMap definition for new Account form
The edit scene and read scene are set to the default scenes that come with the product.
These are subforms in the forms7.nsf database and define mostly javascript code to set up
the environment on the browser to edit or read documents through the Domino Web Access
proxy mechanism.
The Notes form name is the corresponding backend form name and should be stored in a
field of the backend form called Form.
5.5.5 Special subforms for page creation
The subform prefix is the first part of the name for the five subforms needed to define the
Notes fields and items, the JavaScript, and the HTML to display the Domino Web Access
form in the browser. The names for the subforms are:
s_AccountDictionary
s_AccountEdit_Init
s_AccountEdit
s_AccountRead_Init
s_AccountRead
These subforms are shown in detail later.
Note: After adding the specific new formsmap document, the form can be removed again
with Domino Designer. But in case some changes have to be made, the form is needed
again, so it might be better to keep the formsmap form in the forms7 database.

Chapter 5. Feature customization techniques
81
After the forms mapping has been defined and saved it is shown in the Notes client in the
System\Forms view, as shown in Figure 5-8.
Figure 5-8 Account FormsMap in forms7.nsf in System\Forms view
5.5.6 Add the forms and subforms for the scene
For the creation of the whole page content of the ITSO Bank account form main Domino Web
Access page there are five subforms and two forms needed. The subforms are already
mentioned in 5.5.5, “Special subforms for page creation” on page 80. The two forms contain
the externalized JavaScript code for the creation of the action bars in the context of reading or
editing a document.
A good starting point for the creation of the five subforms is to take a look at an existing set of
subforms, for example, the set for the journal called notebook page. These forms are not that
complicated and only have a minimum of code to deliver for the view fields of the notebook
page but also contain the whole code for embedding the Domino Web Access DHTML rich
text editor. In the account form sample only text fields are used to keep it simple.
Subform s_AccountDictionary
In order to define the Notes fields and some additional variables needed for the page creation
the subform contains a section called NotesDictionary. See Example 5-9.
Example 5-9 Code for the s_AccountDictionary subform
<NotesDictionary>
<notesvar name=InitializeFields type=text>
<notesvar name="CalendarOwner"
initialvalue={@Name([Canonicalize];@DbCommand("haiku";"h_GetProfileField";"calenda
rprofile";"Owner"))}>
<notesfield name="Principal"
initialvalue={@If(CalendarOwner!="";CalendarOwner;@UserName(0))}>
<notesfield name="From" authorfield="Yes" initialvalue={@UserName(0)}>
<NOTESFIELD NAME=$NoPurge TYPE=Text INITIALVALUE={"1"}>

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Domino Web Access 7 Customization
<NOTESVAR NAME=h_Name TYPE=Text>
<NOTESFIELD NAME=Form TYPE=Text INITIALVALUE="Account">
<NOTESFIELD NAME="acctno" TYPE=Text>
<NOTESFIELD NAME="accttype" TYPE=Text>
<NOTESFIELD NAME="lastname" TYPE=Text>
<NOTESFIELD NAME="firstname" TYPE=Text>
<NOTESFIELD NAME="internalcontact" TYPE=Text>
</NotesDictionary>
The <NOTESFIELD> tags define the Notes items that will be saved with the document when
the document is saved by the user. Such entries along with NOTESVAR entries define which
Notes items will be represented as JavaScript vars for the h_Vars custom Domino Web
Access formula.
Subform s_AccountEdit_Init
This subform contains code to include the s_AccountEditCode form in the page and
additional variables for the page creation. Also, the pagetitle is set to something useful.
The IF variable is set to an empty string in this example. This variable is used to open the
context-specific help from the help database, if a user clicks the question mark (?) in the form.
The empty string leads to the default Domino Web Access help page.
The value for SceneTitleSkinComponentTitleText sets the title for the window in a document
opened in edit mode.
The formula @{s_FF} returns the server root relative path to the current forms database for
accessing resources in the current forms database and is described in 3.8.4, “Special Domino
Web Access formulas” on page 37.
Example 5-10 Code for s_AccountEdit_Init subform
<NotesDictionary>
<NOTESVAR name=h_SkinTypeOverride TYPE=TEXT initialValue={"h_MailPage"}>
</NotesDictionary>
<script>
SceneTitleSkinComponentTitleText="Account information";
IF="";
</script>
<script
src="@{s_FF}/iNotes/Proxy/?OpenDocument&Form=s_AccountEditCode@{s_StaticJSArgs}">
</script>
Subform s_AccountEdit
In this subform the HTML layout of the page has to be done. This is also where the HTML
form is designed and the JavaScript calls are created to get the data from the frontend form to
the backend document.
The main part is the HTML code construction for the table used to display the form. There are
some special JavaScript functions used: SV (unobfuscated name
pageWrite
) is a function to
write the output of a JavaScript script into the current document. So here is a simplified if
Note: There are different techniques available to include externalized code into a form or
subform. For more information see “Different techniques to include externalized code”.

Chapter 5. Feature customization techniques
83
condition in the (condition?true:false) notation used to display either code for Firefox/Gecko
or Internet Explorer. The function “DLI” (unobfuscated name
gbIsGecko
) is used to decide
wether the current browser is Gecko based. The function DJg (unobfuscated name
unlockTextAreaHeight
) is used to implement for Gecko something comparable to the
overflow-y:auto CSS style.
The last call used haiku.LB.add("qP()") (unobfuscated name for LB is
oOnloadChain
), which
is a function to put the function that is given as a parameter in the onload chain of the current
document. Here there is the function qP() (unobfuscated name
initInputFields
) added, which
is used for the initialization of the fields in the browser. This particular function is defined in
the s_AccountEditCode form, which is documented in “Form s_AccountEditcode” on
page 85.
Example 5-11 Code for the s_AccountEdit subform
<table border="0" width="100%" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0">
<tr><td><img src="@{s_FF}/itsobanner.gif?OpenFileResource&MX"></td></tr>
<tr><td><h2>Account Statement</h2></td></tr>
<tr><td>
<table border="0" cellspacing="2" cellpadding="0" width="100%">
<tr><td class="s-form-label" width=150px>Account #</td><td><script>
SV('<textarea class="s-form-input" name="acctno" id="acctno" rows=1"
style="width:100%;' + (DLI ? 'height:3.1ex" onkeyup="DJg(event)"' :
'overflow-y:auto"') + '></textarea>');</script></td></tr>
<tr><td class="s-form-label">Account Type</td><td><script> SV('<textarea
class="s-form-input" name="accttype" id="accttype" rows=1"
style="width:100%;' + (DLI ? 'height:3.1ex" onkeyup="DJg(event)"' :
'overflow-y:auto"') + '></textarea>');</script></td></tr>
<tr><td class="s-form-label">Lastname</td><td><script> SV('<textarea
class="s-form-input" name="lastname" id="lastname" rows=1"
style="width:100%;' + (DLI ? 'height:3.1ex" onkeyup="DJg(event)"' :
'overflow-y:auto"') + '></textarea>');</script></td></tr>
<tr><td class="s-form-label">Firstname</td><td><script> SV('<textarea
class="s-form-input" name="firstname" id="firstname" rows=1"
style="width:100%;' + (DLI ? 'height:3.1ex" onkeyup="DJg(event)"' :
'overflow-y:auto"') + '></textarea>');</script></td></tr>
<tr><td class="s-form-label">Internal Contact</td><td><script> SV('<textarea
class="s-form-input" name="internalcontact" id="internalcontact" rows=1"
style="width:100%;' + (DLI ? 'height:3.1ex" onkeyup="DJg(event)"' :
'overflow-y:auto"') + '></textarea>');</script></td></tr>
</table>
</td></tr>
</table>
<!-- HIDDEN FIELDS -->
<div style="display:none">
<input name="From" id="From">
<input name="Principal" id="Principal">
<input name="Type" id="Type" value="Account">
<input name="Form" id="Form" value="Account">
</div>
<script>haiku.LB.add("qP()");</script>
Subform s_AccountRead_Init
All variables used for the construction of the form in read mode are defined in this subform. It
also contains a reference for the s_AccountReadCode form, which defines additional

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Domino Web Access 7 Customization
externalized JavaScript functions and is documented in “Form s_AccountReadcode” on
page 87. The use of the script tag with an external form reference will allow for caching of the
external JavaScript and possibly save future bandwidth associated with the page.
The @{s_StaticJSArgs} delivers the desired URL arguments for URLs to external static script
pages. See Example 5-12.
Example 5-12 Code for the s_AccountRead_Init subform
<NotesDictionary>
<NOTESVAR NAME=h_SkinTypeOverride TYPE=TEXT INITIALVALUE={"h_MailPage"}>
<NOTESVAR NAME=h_Details TYPE="Text">
</NotesDictionary>
<script
src="@{s_FF}/iNotes/Proxy/?OpenDocument&Form=s_AccountReadCode@{s_StaticJSArgs}
">
</script>
Subform s_AccountRead
This subform contains the HTML code needed for reading an account document. The HTML
creates a table to display the content in a proper format. Again there are some JavaScript
functions used: “SV” and “haiku.LB.add” are already explained in “Subform s_AccountEdit” on
page 82.
The function “AdjustWindowSize” is used to properly size and position the window in the
onload JavaScript event.
Example 5-13 Code for the s_AccountRead subform
<table border="0" width="100%" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0">
<tr><td><img src="@{s_FF}/itsobanner.gif?OpenFileResource&MX"></td></tr>
<tr><td><h2>Account Statement</h2></td></tr>
<tr><td>
<table border="0" width="100%" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0">
<tr><td class="s-form-label" style="height:.5ex" colspan="2"></td></tr>
<tr><td class="s-form-label-bold" width="20%" valign="BASELINE"
align="left">Account #</td><td class="s-form-label">&nbsp;</td><td
class="s-form-label"
width="90%"><script>SV(window.acctno);</script></td></tr>
<tr><td class="s-form-label-bold" width="20%" valign="BASELINE"
align="left">Account Type</td><td class="s-form-label">&nbsp;</td><td
class="s-form-label"
width="90%"><script>SV(window.accttype);</script></td></tr>
<tr><td class="s-form-label-bold" width="20%" valign="BASELINE"
align="left">Lastname</td><td class="s-form-label">&nbsp;</td><td
class="s-form-label"
width="90%"><script>SV(window.lastname);</script></td></tr>
<tr><td class="s-form-label-bold" width="20%" valign="BASELINE"
align="left">Firstname</td><td class="s-form-label">&nbsp;</td><td
class="s-form-label"
width="90%"><script>SV(window.firstname);</script></td></tr>
<tr><td class="s-form-label-bold" width="20%" valign="BASELINE"
align="left">Internal Contact</td><td class="s-form-label">&nbsp;</td><td
class="s-form-label"
width="90%"><script>SV(window.internalcontact);</script></td></tr>
</table>

Chapter 5. Feature customization techniques
85
</td></tr>
</table>
<script> haiku.LB.add("AdjustWindowSize()");</script>
The form now displays only a minimum of default actions in the action bar. To add an edit
action to the action bar at the appropriate place there has to be added some additional
JavaScript code to the s_AccountRead form.
The code consists of two helper functions, CTf() and DSy(). DSy is a parser for the location
referer and returns back the actual document’s URL. This DSy function is used by the CTf
function, which replaces the read command in the URL with an edit command and replaces
the location URL of the active document browser window. This function is invoked by the edit
button, which is finally inserted into the action bar by the kk() function call.
Example 5-14 Additional JavaScript code for edit action
function CTd()
{
var shref=DSy();
var Bpd=Ns(shref,"PresetFields");
sP=Bpd.replace(',h_SetCommand;h_ShimmerNotesIDPW', '');
sP+=((sP != '')? ',': '') + "h_EditAction;h_ShimmerEdit,s_ReadToEdit;1";
var wL= shref.substring(0,shref.indexOf("?OpenDocument"))
+ "?EditDocument&Form=h_PageUI&PresetFields=" + sP;
window.location.replace(wL);
}
function DSy(){
var sHref=gLoc.href;
var Cix=sHref.indexOf(',h_SetCommand;h_ShimmerNotesIDPW');
if (-1 != Cix)
sHref=sHref.substring(0,Cix);
aUrlComp=sHref.split("/");
var n;
for (n=aUrlComp.length-1;n>=0;n--)
if (aUrlComp[n].indexOf('?OpenDocument')!=-1){
aUrlComp[n-1]=h_PageUnid;
break;
}
return aUrlComp.join("/");
}
function kk () {
Nv("Edit","javascript:CTd()", 'Edit this document', false, 333);
}
Form s_AccountEditcode
This form is used to hold all the JavaScript functions needed to display a valid and proper edit
form in the browser. The functions have important meanings:
Function kk (unobfuscated name
SubScene_Init
)
This function is called to initialize the actual subscene to display. This function is called
during the page creation in the browser. From here another function, Nv, is called.

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Domino Web Access 7 Customization
Function Nv (unobfuscated name
AddSceneAction
)
This function is used to add an action to the actual scenes action bar menu. It takes two
parameters: the first is the actiontitle to display, and the second is the URL to call.
Function kl (unobfuscated name
SubScene_SubmitLogic
)
This function is called from the submit event of the form. In our case we make sure the
principal field has a proper value, and if not we set one. The parameter Bx, which is not
used in our example, delivers a handle to the actual pageframe to the function.
Function mk (unobfuscated name
getObjTitle
)
This function has two tasks:
– Set the document to open in edit mode next time, if it is saved only (not send).
– The second task is to try to update the view window by calling the appropriate helper
function to reflect the new document just created. The function name need only be a
similar function to the one implemented by the main view.
For example, the Notebook view page implements BHV() onubfuscated
nbViewRefresh
(nb for Notebook) function, and the Notebook object code tries to call
such a function (if it exists). Placing logic in a try block allows for graceful coping with
cases where it does not exist (perhaps because the Notebook view page is no longer
displayed within the other window).
Because we do not implement a specific view displaying the account documents, there
is no place to put a specific view-related function. So we try to call the function Bhl()
(unofuscated name
mailViewRefresh
), which is the view refresh for the general mail
view.
Example 5-15 Code for the s_AccountEditcode form
<NotesDictionary>
<NOTESVAR NAME={$ContentType} VALUE={"application/x-javascript"}>
</NotesDictionary>
function kk(){
Nv("Save & Close", "javascript:abPreSubmit('h_Jump')", 'Save and close this
page', false, 20);
Nv("Save", "javascript:abPreSubmit('h_TempSave')", 'Protect your current edits
from accidental loss without leaving this page', false, 90);
Nv("Cancel", "javascript:abPreSubmit(\"h_Exit\")", 'Discard all the changes you
have made', false, 336);
if(h_IsNewDoc == "0") Nv("Print", "javascript:OG()",'Print this
document',false,334);
}
function kl(Bx, submitAction){
theForm.Principal.value=(window.Principal ? window.Principal : haiku.Kq);
return submitAction;
}
function mk(window, submitAction, wN){
if(wN == "h_TempSave") theForm.h_SetEditNextScene.value="s_StdPageEdit";
if(theForm.h_SetReturnURL.value == '<script>self.close();<\/script>')
theForm.h_SetReturnURL.value='<script>try{
var oWin=window.opener?window.opener:window.parent;
oWin.Bhl();
}catch(e){}
self.close();
<\/script>';
return submitAction;

Chapter 5. Feature customization techniques
87
}
function qP(){
if (window.acctno) theForm.acctno.value=acctno;
if (window.accttype) theForm.acctype.value=accttype;
if (window.lastname) theForm.lastname.value=lastname;
if (window.firstname) theForm.firstname.value=firstname;
if (window.internalcontact) theForm.internalcontact.value=internalcontact;
}
Form s_AccountReadcode
This form contributes the externalized JavaScript code for the creation of the page to read an
account form-based document.
The functions kl() and mk() are already explained in “Form s_AccountEditcode” on page 85.
Disregard function fH(). It was used at one time to display an error message for
unimplemented actions.
Example 5-16 Code for the s_AccountReadcode form
<NotesDictionary>
<NOTESVAR NAME={$ContentType} VALUE={"application/x-javascript"}>
</NotesDictionary>
function fH(){alert("Sorry, not yet implemented.");}
function kl(Bx, submitAction){return submitAction;}
function mk(Bx, submitAction, originalAction){
if('h_Delete'==originalAction){
theForm.h_SetReturnURL.value='<script>try{
var oWin=window.opener?window.opener:window.parent;
oWin.Bhl();
}catch(e){}
self.close();
<\/script>';
}
return submitAction;
}
5.5.7 Use the action New Account
If the new design has been applied to the forms database, all Domino Web Access users are
able to use the new action
New Account
in the menu to create a new account document
within the Domino Web Access interface.

88
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
Create new document in Domino Web Access
If everything went OK and users click the Account link in the New menu in the inbox, users
will see a browser window like the one in Figure 5-9.
Figure 5-9 Account form
Read the document
Reading an already saved document through Domino Web Access displays the document in
a window, as shown in Figure 5-10.
Figure 5-10 Reading account document

Chapter 5. Feature customization techniques
89
Forward an account document by mail
If there has been a view created, selecting the account documents in the mail file and the
backend form has been applied to the user’s mail database, then one or more documents can
be selected and forwarded by mail. This functionality of Domino Web Access needs the
Notes backend form to render the document into the body of the new message, as displayed
in Figure 5-11.
Figure 5-11 Forwarding an account document by mail renders the document into the body field
5.5.8 Preferences
The intention of ITSO Bank is to enable awareness and chat by using Sametime®
functionality by default on every user’s mail file. This is accomplished by changing the default
for the instant messaging setting in the preferences document. This section describes the
modifications needed for that customization sample:
Modify s_MailPreferenceEditCode form.
Create the LotusScript agent to modify the preferences document.
Modify s_MailPreferenceEditCode form
In order to change the default of the option in the profile document, the form
s_MailPreferenceEditCode has to be modified. This form contains the code to set the default
values in the preferences form.

90
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
To modify the default, open the form in Designer and search for the string
"SametimeAwareness|0” and change the value to "SametimeAwareness|1". That is all for this
particular case. Save end exit the document. Example 5-17 shows the code fragment with all
default values of the preferences page in a JavaScript array already with our modified value.
Example 5-17 Code fragment of Form s_MailPreferenceEditCode
aFlds=new Array( "MailSaveOpt|1", "MailSort|0", "EnableFTIndex",
"DefaultFolderName" ,"NewMailAlert", "NewMailCheck|1", "NewMailInterval"
,"SoftDeleteExpireTime|48","MailMsgFmt|" + (!haiku.DefaultFormatPlainText ? "1" :
"0"),"MailEditor|1" , "UnreadStyle|red", "ListViewType|0" ,"DateFormat|MM-dd-yyyy"
,"DateSeparator|/" ,"TimeFormat|hh:mmt" ,"TimeSeparator|:" ,"DateFormatLong|dddd,
MMMM dd, yyyy" ,"UseStartTimeZone|" ,"UseCurrentTimeZone|1" ,"UseAddlTimeZone|0"
,"CurTimeZoneLabel" ,"AddlTimeZoneLabel" ,"AdditionalTimeZone" ,"CurrentTimeZone"
,"CalendarFirstDayFiveDay|" + 1 ,"CalendarFirstDayWeek|" + 1
,"CalendarFirstDayMonth|" + 0 ,"StartupView|" + BHd[0].systemName
,"DisableDragDropAndInPlace|0" ,"NamePreference|0" ,"SametimeAwareness|1"
,"EnableSignMail|0", "EnableEncryptMail|0", "EnableEncryptUnTrustInetCertsMail|0"
,"ReuseChildWindows|0" ,"SCDictionary" );
All new Domino Web Access users will now get the new default for that setting in the
preferences dialog.
Create a LotusScript agent to modify the preference for existing users
Example 5-18 is the LotusScript agent that can be run to modify the existing inotesprofile
documents to enable instant messaging for all users.
Example 5-18 Agent to enable instant messaging
Sub Initialize
Dim session As New NotesSession
Dim db As NotesDatabase
Dim doc As NotesDocument
Dim Count As Integer
Set db = session.CurrentDatabase
Set doc = db.GetProfileDocument("inotesprofile")
count = "1"
doc.SametimeAwareness = count
Call doc.save(False,False)
End Sub
An administrator can modify this setting for all existing mail files on one server by modifying
the example below. This can be done using the methods and properties of the
NotesDbDirectory class, which allows you to cycle through all of the databases on a particular
server. Example 5-19 is a sample provided to illustrate one way to approach this issue.
Example 5-19 Agent to enable instant messaging on all mail files
Sub Initialize
Dim db As NotesDatabase
Dim acl As NotesACL
Note: This agent can be added to any database on the server, like the names.nsf. It can
be set to run from the actions menu or on a schedule. Remember to modify servername
and mailpath before using this agent.

Chapter 5. Feature customization techniques
91
Dim entry As NotesACLEntry
Dim cprofile As NotesDocument
Dim pos As Integer
Dim found As Integer
Dim servername As String
Dim mailpath As String
Dim mailowner As String
Dim doc As notesdocument
'PARAMETERS TO CODE
'Indicate mail subdirectory name
mailpath = "mail\"
'Server name (in canonical format):
servername = "boston/ITSObank"
Dim dbdir As New NotesDbDirectory(servername)
'Cycle through databases on the server
Set db = dbdir.GetFirstDatabase(DATABASE)
While Not db Is Nothing
'Skip databases which you don't have access to
On Error 4060 Goto Error4060
'Check to see if this database is in the mail directory
pos = Instr(db.FilePath, mailpath)
If pos = 1 Then
Call db.Open(servername, db.FilePath)
Set doc = db.GetProfileDocument("inotesprofile")
count = "1"
doc.SametimeAwareness = count
Call doc.save(False,False)
End If
GetNextDb:
Set db = dbdir.GetNextDatabase()
Wend
Exit Sub
Error4060:
'If the code reaches here then the user does not have access rights.
Resume GetNextDb
End Sub
Attention: The person executing this code must have manager rights to the mail files. If a
single user does not have manager rights to all the mail files then the agent can be
executed by an administrator with full access.

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Domino Web Access 7 Customization

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2006. All rights reserved.
93
Chapter 6.
Administrative customizations
This chapter highlights some areas of Domino Web Access customization that can be
performed with common administration techniques. This section include:
Customizing Domino Web Access for different groups of users
Key notes.ini variables
Domino Web Access redirect
6

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Domino Web Access 7 Customization
6.1 Different customizations for different audiences
Different groups of users in an organization may have different Domino Web Access
customization needs. It is possible to meet the requirements of different groups by having
each group access its own Domino server. This can be resource intensive so a second
approach is to use different forms7 files and point them to different Domino Web Access mail
templates.
6.1.1 How to use different forms databases
Forms7.nsf introduces a new NotesVar named s_FF that retrieves from the server the current
forms file name. This is a significant improvement in Release 7 because there is no concern
that the forms file can be replaced during the upgrade process. Example 6-1 demonstrates
how to change the value of the $FormsTemplateFile item within the icon note of both the mail
template and the forms file to refer to a different name. This change will be automatically
picked up by Domino Web Access.
Example 6-1 Renaming the forms file name in the icon note
Sub Initialize
Dim sess As New NotesSession
Dim db As NotesDatabase
Dim agent As NotesAgent
Dim doc As NotesDocument
Dim item As NotesItem
Dim n As String
Set db = sess.CurrentDatabase
n = "FFFF0010"
Set doc = db.GetDocumentByID(n)
Set item = doc.ReplaceItemValue("$FormsTemplateFile", "iNotes/Custom7.nsf")
Call doc.save(True,True)
End Sub
In addition, there are some NOTES.INI (see Table 6-1) settings to allow other forms files to be
treated as valid by the server.
Table 6-1 NOTES.INI settings to use a custom forms file
Important: It is fundamental to use a forward slash (/) as the path separation character.
INI Settings Description
iNotes_WA_FormsFiles Override default list of forms files supported on server.
Example:
iNotes_WA_FormsFiles=iNotes/Custom7.nsf,iNotes/Forms7
.nsf,iNotes/Form6.nsf,iNotes/Forms5.nsf

Chapter 6. Administrative customizations
95
6.2 notes.ini variables affecting Domino Web Access
There are several notes.ini parameters that can be implemented on the Domino Web Access
server to configure the Domino Web Access user environment. Most Domino Web Access
notes.ini parameters came into being as a result of customer requests for the functionality
provided. In this section we examine the notes.ini parameters.
There are a bunch of notes.ini parameters for Domino Web Access. Most of the parameters
up to Version 6.5.4 are collected and documented in technote 1089521:
http://www-1.ibm.com/support/docview.wss?rs=0&uid=swg21089521
6.2.1 Configuration settings versus notes.ini parameters
In the server configuration document for your Domino Web Access server you will find a tab
labeled Domino Web Access. This tab is where the server administrator configures much of
the Domino Web Access environment. Below, various Domino Web Access configuration
options on this tab are discussed in terms of customization.
Some notes.ini settings used for configuring Sametime integration with Domino Web Access
have been replaced by settings in the configuration settings document in Domino 7. To
configure users with the DWA7 mail template, use the appropriate settings on the Domino
Web Access tab of the configuration settings document instead of these variables.
Although you cannot use these notes.ini settings for Domino 7, they have not been removed
and are still valid for users who have the iNotes6 mail template.
Table 6-2 notes.ini settings and corresponding configuration settings document fields
iNotes_WA_DefaultFormsFile Override the default forms file to use when a DWA mail file
specifies a forms file that does not exist on the server.
Example:
iNotes_WA_DefaultFormsFile=iNotes/Custom7.nsf
INI Settings Description
Important: notes.ini parameters implemented on the server will not be pushed down to
Domino Offline Services. The pre-packaged notes.ini for DOLS is under n_Dolbase.exe
and needs to be modified to include the new notes.ini parameters. Also, the Version string
under n_Dolbase.inf needs to be incremented. These files can be modified and packaged
in a similar manner as discussed in 3.1.1, “Domino Web Access Customization in Domino
6.5” on page 18, for n_Shimmer7_en.exe and n_Shimmer7_en.inf.
Important: In a mixed version environment with both iNotes6.ntf and DWA7.ntf mail users,
the notes.ini setting will apply to iNotes6 users, but the corresponding configuration
settings will override notes.ini settings for DWA7 users.
notes.ini setting Configuration settings document field
iNotes_WA_Chat Instant messaging features
iNotes_WA_LiveNames Online awareness

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Domino Web Access 7 Customization
6.2.2 Obsolete notes.ini variables in Domino Web Access 7
Every release of Notes and Domino contains a list of the obsolete INI settings that can and
should be checked. Technote 1207338 describes notes.ini settings that are obsolete for
Notes and Domino 7:
http://www-1.ibm.com/support/docview.wss?rs=0&uid=swg21207338
6.2.3 New or modified notes.ini variables in Notes and Domino 7
With each release of Domino new notes.ini parameters are introduced allowing customers
the flexibility to add and remove functionality. In a future release some of these ini settings
may be integrated with the configuration document. The following are the new or modified
notes.ini variables in Notes and Domino 7.
iNotes_WA_Areas
The value is a set of 6 bits, which can be 0 or 1. Each bit represents one functional area to
display or not to display in the following way:
iNotes_WA_Areas=ABCDEF
Where:
A: Welcome
B: Mail
C: Calendar
D: ToDo
E: Contacts
F: Notebook
0: Disable Functional area
1: Enable Functional Area
For example, iNotes_WA_Areas=010010 would make only Mail and Contacts available.
iNotes_WA_NamePickerSearchAccentInsensitive
Defaults:
R6.x: iNotes_WA_NamePickerSearchAccentInsensitive=0
R7: iNotes_WA_NamePickerSearchAccentInsensitive=1
Values:
iNotes_WA_NamePickerSearchAccentInsensitive=0 - Name Picker search becomes
accent sensitive
iNotes_WA_NamePickerSearchAccentInsensitive=1 - Name Picker search becomes
accent insensitive
iNotes_WA_SametimeJavaConnect Prefer Sametime Java Connect for browsers
iNotes_WA_NoLocalArchive Local archiving
iNotes_WA_SametimeServer Set an Instant Messaging server host name for all
Domino Web Access users
iNotes_WA_SametimeToken Allow secrets and tokens authentication
iNotes_WA_STLinksLocal Loading \stlinks from Domino application server
notes.ini setting Configuration settings document field

Chapter 6. Administrative customizations
97
The default behavior of the Name Picker search is changed to accent (diacritical mark)
insensitive in Release 7. In Release 6.5.5 and later, the default behavior is accent
sensitive.
iNotes_WA_PrintUserStyleSheet
The parameter iNotes_WA_PrintUserStyleSheet is used to specify a user-defined style
sheet for printing. (For example, a specific Linux® environment where the display
resolution is set to lower than the default, and print output would be larger than expected.)
Specify the relative URL of the user-defined style sheet file (*.css) for printing under
Domino's html directory. For example, if the file print.css is put under data\domino\html:
iNotes_WA_PrintUserStyleSheet=print.css
iNotes_WA_Cache_Stats_On
Set to 1 to enable stats, but note that this will affect performance.
iNotes_WA_FormsCache_Size
Set the max number of entries in the orms cache (default 256).
iNotes_WA_SubformsCache_Size
Set the max number of entries in the subforms cache (default 256).
iNotes_WA_SkinGroupsCache_Size
Set the max number of entries in the skin groups cache (default 256)
iNotes_WA_QueryAgents
Set to "1" to enable the ability to customize Domino Web Access to invoke Web Query Open
or Web Query Save agents.
iNotes_WA_debug
Setting this variable is very useful for JavaScript error testing and debugging. Instead of the
standard error message Sorry we are unable to process...., a call stack of the current
JavaScript on the server side is displayed. This helps diagnose where a particular problem
resides. The variable is documented in technote 1164431:
http://www-1.ibm.com/support/docview.wss?rs=0&uid=swg21164431
iNotes_WA_DefaultFormatPlainText
When this is set to 1, two things happen:
(For new users) the default mail format preference is set to plain text.
When the mail format preference is set to prompt me when sending, the default format on
the prompt UI is set to plain text.
iNotes_WA_ReadAttachments
When set to 0, Domino Web Access users will not be able to read attachments. When set to
1, Domino Web Access users will be able to read attachments. The default is 1. There is also
functionality in Domino 7 to disable the ability to read attachments via an argument on the
URL. If &ra=0 is placed on the URL, the Domino Web Access user will not be able to read
Important: Stats should not be on all of the time because they could affect performance.
Also, making the cache size too small could affect performance.

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Domino Web Access 7 Customization
attachments. The URL argument might be used to block particular users via a reverse proxy
rule or custom Web page.
iNotes_WA_WriteAttachments
When set to 0, Domino Web Access users will not be able to write attachments. When set to
1, Domino Web Access users will be able to write attachments. The default is 1. There is also
functionality in Domino 7 to disable the ability to write attachments via an argument on the
URL. If &wa=0 is placed on the URL, the Domino Web Access user will not be able to write
attachments.
iNotes_WA_ReuseChildWindows=1
When this feature is set, Domino Web Access caches and then reuses portions of the Mail
and Calendar forms that do not change. For example, when a user opens a message, the
Read Message window opens. The Read Message form is also cached without the message
text. The form is then used to display any additional messages that the user opens in the
same window. This eliminates the time it takes to close the first window and open a
subsequent message in a new one.
iNotes_WA_DisableReuseChildWindows
When this notes.ini value is set to 1 it turns off the Reuse Child Windows UI option and
disables the feature globally.
6.3 Domino Web Access redirect personal options
Using the Domino Web Access redirect database adds value in terms of customization. The
out-of-the-box database already supports some administrative features to offer personal
options or specific startup customizations to Domino Web Access users.

Chapter 6. Administrative customizations
99
6.3.1 Configuration document options
The Domino Server settings for the default page that is loaded for a Domino Web Access user
is set in the configuration document. This setting can be changed per server and also in the
default configuration document. For example, the default template leads the user to the
Welcome page of Domino Web Access, as shown in Figure 6-1.
Figure 6-1 Configuration settings document

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Domino Web Access 7 Customization
This default can be changed by the administrator in the configuration document to point all
users to a different page. The options available are shown in Figure 6-2.
Figure 6-2 Startup screen options in configuration document

Chapter 6. Administrative customizations
101
6.3.2 DWA redirect options
The administration of the Domino Web Access redirect database allows a customer to set
additional options to customize what users can select and how the redirection is displayed.
Additionally, Figure 6-3 shows the Domino Web Access Redirect configuration screen with
the following options set:
Corporate logo set to the ITSO Bank banner
Background color set to the corporate standard
Enable the personal options for the user being redirected
Figure 6-3 Redirect options administration

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Domino Web Access 7 Customization
The Domino Web Access redirect page then displays an additional button for the end user
called
Personal Options
, as shown in Figure 6-4.
Figure 6-4 Personal options button in Domino Web Access redirect
Clicking the Personal Options button leads the user to a page where the start page can be
selected from a set of predefined options like those in Figure 6-5.
Figure 6-5 Personal options selection window
The default list can also be customized to display different target page layouts or even
customized Domino Web Access pages. The place to put the option values and links for the

Chapter 6. Administrative customizations
103
redirections is the form
WMRProfile
. The options are set in the combobox field called
WMRProfileURL
. This field’s values can be extended, modified, or deleted as needed. For
an example see Figure 6-6.
Figure 6-6 WMRProfile form with options for WMRProfileURL

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Domino Web Access 7 Customization

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2006. All rights reserved.
105
Appendix A.
Additional customization tips
A

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Domino Web Access 7 Customization
Creating a custom help document in the Domino Web Access
help database
The content of all Help pages is stored as a file resource to the iNotes/help70_iwa_en.nsf
database. If a new page or dialog is being added or an existing page is modified it might be
useful to also customize the help document or to create an additional one. The name of the
HTML file has to be put into the IF variable in the page init context, as shown in “Subform
s_AccountEdit_Init” on page 82. An easy way to customize or add a help page it is to start
with an existing help HTML file in the help database.
Different techniques to include externalized code
There are at least two ways to include the externalized code content of forms or subforms in
other forms or subforms to keep them as small as possible.
One option is to use the <includesubform> special DWA tag. This includes all of the HTML
and JavaScript code from the subform named in the tag at the location where the tag is
placed. This is done by the http server and the result is delivered to the browser.
The other option is to move the code to an external script file by utilizing an HTML script tag
with a src value referencing another Domino Web Access form that is set up to contain
JavaScript content ($ContentType NOTESVAR set to "application/x-javascript"). This results
in the browser loading the external page when it encounters the tag. The script tag would take
the form:
<script src="@{s_FF}/iNotes/Proxy/?OpenDocument&Form=s_SomeForm@{s_StaticJSArgs}">
The use of a script tag to load an external page (part) is so all the script code is not emitted as
part of a top-level page. This top-level page may not be cacheable, and hence every time it is
invoked all scripts are also included, increasing bandwidth consumption and slowing down
performance of that page. Placing it in an external page part and setting that part to be
cacheable avoids increasing the bandwidth consumed on subsequent re-visits to the top
page (or similar pages) since the external script file will now be in the browser cache and can
be potentially reused. If the external script part is a data-related script and not static code, it
cannot be cached, and there is no benefit to having it in an external script file.
If the external script is really a data-related script (contains formulas that evaluate to different
values at different times or for different users), unless it will remain static for some period of
time and hence can be set up to be cached. There is limited benefit to having it be an external
file.
Tools helpful for Domino Web Access Development
The sections below reference helpful tools for Domino Web Access customization.
NotesPeek
In case you want to dig into the documents in forms7.nsf or dwa7.nsf that are not viewable
with the Notes client you should consider NotesPeek.
NotesPeek was written for technical Domino administrators who want to see more of a raw
view of their Notes databases than the Notes client provides. It presents the information in
Notes databases as it is available through the Notes API.

Appendix A. Additional customization tips
107
NotesPeek is based on a containment hierarchy: Notes servers have databases, databases
have documents, documents have items, and so on. For the most part, this containment
hierarchy is that presented by the API. Selecting a line in the tree view on the left displays
information about that line in the text view on the right.
NotesPeek displays almost all of the data available through the Notes API. Where data
cannot be interpreted because its format is not documented, it is displayed as a hex dump.
NotesPeek is provided
as is
by IBM and can be downloaded at:
http://www-10.lotus.com/ldd/sandbox.nsf/0/2791869f4e1d3fa385256f2c00432973?
OpenDocument
Figure A-1 shows NotesPeek to display the content of a profile document.
Figure A-1 NotesPeek showing an inotesprofile
Firefox extensions and tools
In this section we discuss Firefox extensions and tools.

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DOM Inspector
The DOM Inspector comes with the Firefox distribution and is installed as part of Firefox if the
Developer Tools option is selected in the custom installation dialog box. If installed, the DOM
Inspector can be called at any time in the browser by pressing Shift+Ctrl+I. Figure A-2 shows
the DOM Inspector with a Domino Web Access page displaying the table of contents (TOC)
elements of the page.
Figure A-2 DOM Inspector displaying a Domino Web Access page
Web Developer
Web Developer helps developers with many very helpful tools included in the toolbar. The
download address is:
https://addons.mozilla.org/firefox/60/
After installation, the Web Developer toolbar is displayed after the next restart of the Firefox
browser. The toolbar is shown in Figure A-3.
Figure A-3 Web Developer toolbar

Appendix A. Additional customization tips
109
For example, a developer can dig into the page structure in terms of outlining tags, editing the
css code live, so any update displays immediately without affecting the real site online.
Figure A-4 shows Web Developer outlining table cells.
Figure A-4 Web Developer outlining table cells

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Domino Web Access 7 Customization
Another very useful example is the in-place edit of the cascading stylesheet. Modifying a
particular style immediately affects the page display. The css is not written back to the server
but can be saved localy. Figure A-5 shows an example of the css editor.
Figure A-5 Web Developer CSS editing sidebar

Appendix A. Additional customization tips
111
View formatted source
This tool hooks into the Tools menu of Firefox and also into the right-click menu. Figure A-6
shows the Tools menu. It can be launched from almost every Web page displayed. The
source code is displayed in a color-coded formatted view and also displays the css
information for each tag. The source code can be folded and expanded with plus signs (+)
and minus signs (-) before each parenthesized section like table, tr, td, div, span, and so on.
Figure A-6 View Formatted source menu
Also, there is an option to display colored inline selection frames for specific areas of the
page. These can be clicked and will display only the source for that particular section of the
page. The source code displayed is based on the rendered document so every dynamically
modified element, either by DOM or JavaScript, is displayed in the way the browser renders
the data.
The tool can be downloaded at:
https://addons.mozilla.org/firefox/697/
After installation Firefox needs to be restarted to enable the extension.

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Domino Web Access 7 Customization
Figure A-7 shows the tool in the inline mode displaying the source code of the mail file quota
usage bar.
Figure A-7 View source inline mode
View source Chart
This tool produces a colored chart of the currently displayed Web page, using the rendered
code, so all includes like JavaScript and DHTML modifications are integrated. The tool can be
downloaded at:
https://addons.mozilla.org/firefox/655/

Appendix A. Additional customization tips
113
Figure A-8 shows a sample output of View Source Chart charting the Domino Web Access
mail page. The tool does not have as many other extensions are under the tools menu. It is
integrated into the view menu of the Firefox browser.
Figure A-8 Sample view source chart output
JavaScript debugger
The Firefox/Mozilla JavaScript debugger is better know by its codename Venkman. It
provides a powerful debugging environment for JavaScript code within Mozilla and Firefox.
The debugger can be downloaded at:
https://addons.mozilla.org/firefox/216/
Internet Explorer tools
Here we discuss Internet Explorer tools.
Internet Explorer Developer Toolbar
At the time of this writing a preview version of the Microsoft IE Developer toolbar is available.
The Microsoft Internet Explorer Developer Toolbar provides a variety of tools for quickly
creating, understanding, and troubleshooting Web pages.
The download of the Microsoft’s IE Developer toolbar is available at:
http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=e59c3964-672d-4511-bb3e-2
d5e1db91038&displaylang=en

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Figure A-9 shows the new toolbar in Internet Explorer.
Figure A-9 Internet Explorer Developer Toolbar
The DOM Inspector of the IE developer Toolbar is shown in Figure A-10. Note that this tool is
a read-only tool, so you can read all objects and properties, but cannot modify them.
Figure A-10 Internet Explorer DOM Inspector
Documentation
In this section we review documentation.
Note: This tool was still a beta version at the time this Redpaper was written.

Appendix A. Additional customization tips
115
HTML, CSS, JavaScript, DOM, and DHTML
Developers should be very familiar with JavaScript, CSS, HTML, DHTML, and the DOM
implementation of the targeted browser. Some links are provided for your convenience
regarding these topics:
JavaScript documentation
– Microsoft MSDN® JScript® Language Reference
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/library/en-us/script56/ht
ml/29f83a2c-48c5-49e2-9ae0-7371d2cda2ff.asp
– IE JScript objects
http://www.irt.org/xref/jscript_objects.htm
– SUN Microsystems Developer Connection JavaScript Resource Center
http://java.sun.com/javascript/index.jsp
HTML
– W3C HTML home page
http://www.w3.org/MarkUp/
– Microsoft MSDN article “HTML and Dynamic HTML Reference”
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/workshop/author/dhtml/dht
ml_node_entry.asp
DOM
– W3C Document Object Model (DOM)
http://www.w3.org/DOM/
– Microsoft MSDN article “About the DHTML Object Model”
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/workshop/author/dhtml/dht
ml_node_entry.asp
– Mozilla DOM Reference
http://developer.mozilla.org/en/docs/Gecko_DOM_Reference
Cascading Stylesheets (CSS)
– W3C CSS home page
http://www.w3.org/Style/CSS/
Additional tools
In this section we discuss additional tools.
LDAP Browser
If you need to analyze any LDAP issues there is a very good tool called
LDAP Browser
from
Softerra, Ltd. that you can use to examine the LDAP environment, LDAP server responses,
and so on at a very comfortable level. This can help a lot to get any issues regarding LDAP
with Single-Sign On, Sametime integration, Domino Assistance with LDAP, and so on. The
product is free of charge and can be downloaded at:
http://www.ldapbrowser.com/

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CSS Stylesheet Editor
Topstyle from NewsGator Technologies, Inc. is a stylesheet editing tool. It can be
downloaded from:
http://www.newsgator.com/NGOLProduct.aspx?ProdID=TopStyle
Wrapper functions for action menu operations
As demonstrated by examples provided in Chapter 5, “Feature customization techniques” on
page 65, you can see the improvement in action menu operations with Version 7.0.1, as
compared to Version 6.5. In this appendix, we have provided you with useful JavaScript
wrapper functions to make it easier to manipulate action menus in Version 6.5.
We also provide the comparable functions for Version 7.0.1 to provide you with a more
powerful way to work with action menus without having to be concerned with the details of the
implementation of the DM functions discussed in 5.2, “Domino Web Access functions for
Action menu operations” on page 67. Additionally, these wrapper functions enable you to
build an array to add, overwrite, or remove multiple action menus easily.
removeActions function
Here the removeAction function takes two arguments. The first argument is the array passed
in as the third argument to Scene_Actions (a_Actions for forms6.nsf and s_TopBranchId for
forms7.nsf). The second argument is an array consisting of positions or titles identifying
menus to remove.
Table A-1 shows details of the expected properties in this passed in array.
Table A-1 Details of properties passed as parameter array to removeActions function
Removing action menu in Version 6.5
Example A-1 shows the wrapper and helper functions for removing an action menu item in
Version 6.5 and the forms6.nsf database.
Example: A-1 Remove action menu wrapper and helper functions in Version 6.5
// Helper functions:
// Routine to add visible position numbers to displayed menu titles. This will
allow to easily
Parameter Description
title Visible text of action entry to remove.
pos Position number of action entry to remove (only way to remove
image-only actions). There is also a check Positions routine below to
modify DWA to have it display all the top-level position values.
suboffsets An array of submenu offsets to be removed. Each entry is a
zero-based offset. If such an array is present, then the top-level menu
is not removed. (You should not use both this and subtitles within the
same object.)
subtitles An array of submenu visible names to be removed. If such an array is
present, then the top-level menu is not removed. (You should not
specify both suboffsets and subtitles.)

Appendix A. Additional customization tips
117
// identify positions that you desire to remove. Particularly helpful for
non-textual actions
function checkPositions(a_Actions) {
var a=[], n=0;
for(var i=0;i<a_Actions.length;i++) {
if( typeof a_Actions[i].title == "string" )
a_Actions[i].title = a_Actions[i].pos + ':' + a_Actions[i].title;
else
a_Actions[i].title[0] = a_Actions[i].pos + ':' +a_Actions[i].title[0];
}
}
// Check the passed in array to see if it applies to each action being processed
function checkRemoval(a, action) {
for(var i=0; i<a.length; i++) {
if( typeof a[i].pos != "undefined") {
if( a[i].pos == action.pos )
return i;
} else if( a[i].title) {
if( typeof action.title=="string") {
if (a[i].title == action.title )
return i;
} else if (a[i].title == action.title[0])
return i;
}
}
return -1;
}
// Routine to remove subentries based on offsets or titles
function removeSubEntries(action,aSubEntries) {
var aSubMenu=action.href;
var aNewMenu=[], n=0;
var bIsPos = typeof aSubEntries[0] == "number";
var nEntries=aSubMenu.length/2;
var j=0;
for(var i=0;i<nEntries;i++) {
if(j<aSubEntries.length && ( (bIsPos && i==aSubEntries[j]) || (!bIsPos &&
aSubMenu[i*2].split("|")[0]==aSubEntries[j])) )
j++;
else {
aNewMenu[n++]=aSubMenu[i*2];
aNewMenu[n++]=aSubMenu[(i*2)+1];
}
}
action.href=aNewMenu;
}
/* The first argument is the array passed in as the 3rd argument to Scene_Actions
* The second argument is an array of numbers or titles indicating top level
actions to remove
* See ActionPositions.txt for actions associated with various DWA actions
* Sample removal array by Position: [
{pos:0,suboffsets:null},{pos:50,suboffsets:[0,1,2,3,4]}];

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* Sample removal array by Title: [{title:"New", subtitles:null},{title:"Tools",
subtitles:["Out of Office",...]}]
*/
function removeActions(a_Actions,a_ToRemove) {
var nPos;
var aRemove=[], n=0;
var bIsSubMenu = false;
for(var i=0;i<a_Actions.length;i++) {
nPos = checkRemoval(a_ToRemove,a_Actions[i]);
if( nPos != -1 ) {
bIsSubMenu = typeof(a_Actions[i].href) == "object";
if(a_ToRemove[nPos].suboffsets && bIsSubMenu) {
removeSubEntries(a_Actions[i],a_ToRemove[nPos].suboffsets);
} else if(a_ToRemove[nPos].subtitles && bIsSubMenu) {
removeSubEntries(a_Actions[i],a_ToRemove[nPos].subtitles);}
else
aRemove[n++] = a_Actions[i];
}
}
if(aRemove.length) {
// BOY == removeItems
a_Actions.BOY(aRemove,true);
}
}
Removing action by position
The wrapper functions allow you to remove the action menu either by menu label or by
position. In some cases, you will not be able to remove the action menu by label. Examples
for such cases are non-textual actions like refresh, print, and delete.
The checkPositions function in Example A-1 on page 116 is very useful when you want to
remove an action menu by position instead of by menu label. It displays the position next to
the menu label, as depicted in Figure A-11.
Figure A-11 Action menus with positions displayed in Version 6.5
Example A-2 provides an example of removing an action menu by position.
Example: A-2 Remove menu by position in Version 6.5
function Scene_Actions( s_SceneName, o_Window, a_Actions ){
...
switch (s_SceneName) {
case 'Mail':
checkPositions(a_Actions);
// To remove Tools -> Block Mail from Sender action menu by position
var a=[{pos:330,suboffsets:[3]}];
removeActions(a_Actions, a);

Appendix A. Additional customization tips
119
// To remove the New top level menu by position value
removeActions(a_Actions, [{pos:0}]);
// To remove the 3-5th submenus within a top level menu named New
var a=[{title:"New", suboffsets:[2,3,4]}];
removeActions(a_Actions, a);
break;
default:
break;
}
...
}
Removing action menu by label
Example A-3 is an example of removing an action menu by label.
Example: A-3 Remove menu by label in Version 6.5
function Scene_Actions( s_SceneName, o_Window, a_Actions ){
...
switch (s_SceneName) {
case 'Mail':
// To remove Tools -> Block Mail from Sender action menu using label
var a=[{title:"Tools",subtitles:["Block Mail from Sender"]}];
removeActions(a_Actions, a);
// To remove a top level (and any submenus it contains)
removeActions(a_Actions, [{title:"New"}]);
// To remove a "Message" submenu within a "New" top level menu
removeActions(a_Actions, [{title:"New", subtitles: ["Message"]}]);
// To remove a "Message" and "Contact" submenus
// within a "New" top level menu
var a=[{title:"New", subtitles: ["Message", "Contact"]}];
removeActions(a_Actions, a);
break;
default:
break;
}
...
}

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Removing action menu in Version 7.0.1
Example A-4 shows the comparable wrapper and helper functions for removing an action
menu item in Version 7.0.1 and the forms7.nsf database.
Example: A-4 Remove action menu wrapper functions in Version 7.0.1
// Routine to add visible position numbers to displayed menu titles.
// This will allow to easily identify positions that you desire to remove.
// Particularly helpful for non-textual actions
// Also provides a way to display menuids by passing true to the second argument.
function checkPositions(branchId, bDisplayIds, bDisplayPos) {
if(arguments.length < 3)
bDisplayPos = true;
if(arguments.length < 2)
bDisplayIds = false;
var a_Actions = DZo(branchId); /* DM_getBranch */
var menuNode, aSubMenu;
var i,j;
for(i=0;i<a_Actions.length;i++) {
if( typeof a_Actions[i] == "string" )
menuNode = DPN(a_Actions[i])
else
menuNode = a_Actions[i];
menuNode.label = (bDisplayPos && typeof menuNode.pos == "number" ?
menuNode.pos : '') +
(bDisplayIds ? ('[' + menuNode.$id + ']') : '') + ':' + menuNode.label;
if(menuNode.$branchId && bDisplayIds) {
checkPositions(menuNode.$branchId, bDisplayIds, false);
}
}
}
// Routine to remove subentries based on offsets or titles
function removeSubEntries(action,aSubEntries) {
var i;
var menuNode;
if( typeof aSubEntries[0] == "number" ) {
var aSubMenu= DZo(action.$branchId); /* DM_getBranch */
var nEntries=aSubMenu.length;
var j=0;
var aRemoval = [], n=0;
for(i=0;i<nEntries;i++) {
if(j<aSubEntries.length && i==aSubEntries[j]) {
aRemoval[n++] = aSubMenu[i];
j++;
}
}
for (i=0;i<aRemoval.length;i++)
DGa(aRemoval[i]);
}
else {
// Find by title
for(i=0; i<aSubEntries.length; i++) {
menuNode = CyE(action.$branchId, aSubEntries[i]);
if(menuNode)

Appendix A. Additional customization tips
121
DGa(menuNode.$id);
}
}
}
/* The first argument is the branch id passed in
* as the 3rd argument to Scene_Actions
* The second argument is an array consisting of positions
* or titles identifying menus to remove
* Sample removal array by Position:
* [{pos:0,suboffsets:null},{pos:50,suboffsets:[0,1,2,3,4]}];
* Sample removal array by Title:
* [{title:"New", subtitles:null},{title:"Tools", subtitles:["Out of
Office",...]}]
* The array can contain a mixture of these techniques if desired.
*/
function removeActions(branchId,a_ToRemove) {
var action;
var bIsSubMenu = false;
for(var i=0;i<a_ToRemove.length;i++) {
if(typeof a_ToRemove[i].pos != "undefined")
action = Dap(branchId, a_ToRemove[i].pos);
else if (a_ToRemove[i].title)
action = CyE(branchId, a_ToRemove[i].title);
if(action) {
bIsSubMenu = action.$branchId ? true : false;
if(a_ToRemove[i].suboffsets && bIsSubMenu) {
removeSubEntries(action,a_ToRemove[i].suboffsets);
} else if(a_ToRemove[i].subtitles && bIsSubMenu) {
removeSubEntries(action,a_ToRemove[i].subtitles);
}
else
DGa(action.$id);
}
}
}
Removing action by position
As discussed earlier, the wrapper functions allow you to remove the action menu either by
menu label or by position. In order to remove non-textual action like refresh, print, and delete,
you will need to remove the action by position.

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The checkPositions function is useful when you want to remove an action menu by position
instead of by menu label. If you set the second argument bDisplayIds to true, it will display the
IDs (for example, dm$0000006). Similarly, setting the third argument bDisplayPos to true will
display the position (for example, position 1 for New). See Figure A-12 for a visual
representation after running this function.
Figure A-12 Action menus with positions and ID displayed in Version 7.0.1
Example A-5 is an example of removing an action menu by position.
Example: A-5 Remove action by position in Version 7.0.1
function Scene_Actions( s_SceneName, o_Window, a_Actions ){
...
switch(s_SceneName) {
case 'Mail':
checkPositions(s_TopBranchId, true, true);
// Remove the "Tools\Block Mail from Sender" action using position
removeActions(s_TopBranchId, [{pos:330, suboffsets:[5]}]);
// To remove a top level menu with a particular position value
removeActions(s_TopBranchId, [{pos:1}]);
// To remove the 3-5th submenus within a top level menu named New
var a=[{title:"New", suboffsets:[2,3,4]}];
removeActions(s_TopBranchId, a);
default:
break;
}
...
}
Removing action by label
Example A-6 is an example of removing an action menu by label.
Example: A-6 Remove action by label in Version 7.0.1
function Scene_Actions( s_SceneName, o_Window, a_Actions ){
...
switch(s_SceneName) {
case 'Mail':
// Remove the "Tools\Block Mail from Sender" action using label

Appendix A. Additional customization tips
123
removeActions(s_TopBranchId, [{title:"Tools", subtitles:["Block Mail from
Sender"]}]);
// To remove a top level (and any submenus it contains)
removeActions(s_TopBranchId, [{title:"New"}]);
// To remove a "Message" submenu within a "New" top level menu
removeActions(s_TopBranchId, [{title:"New", subtitles: ["Message"]}]);
// To remove a "Message" and "Contact" submenus
// within a "New" top level menu
var a=[{title:"New", subtitles: ["Message", "Contact"]}];
removeActions(s_TopBranchId, a);
default:
break;
}
...
}
addActions function
The addActions function used here takes two arguments. The first argument is the third
argument passed into Scene_Actions (a_Actions for forms6.nsf and s_TopBranchId for
forms7.nsf). The second argument is an array of objects with a special structure to support
inserting and updating entries without having to worry about specific menu APIs.
Table A-2 shows details of the expected properties for each top-level menu object in this
passed in array.
Table A-2 Details of properties passed as parameter array to addActions function
Parameter Description
title Visible text to display for the new or updated action.
pos Position number for where this action should appear. Lower positions are to the
left and higher positions are to the right.
href The URL to invoke on a click of the action. This can be a JavaScript URL referring
to a custom function provided by the customizer.
helpText Hover text displayed when a user hovers over the action.
img URL to an image to display for the action. The image will appear to the left of any
title specified.
img_width Numeric value representing the width of the image specified by the img property.
img_height Numeric value representing the height of the image specified by the img property.
submenus An array of submenu objects to be inserted.
find An object with properties related to finding an existing action to facilitate replacing
properties of the top-level action or inserting submenus at a particular location
within the submenu.

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Domino Web Access 7 Customization
Table A-3 displays details of the expected properties for each submenu object in the
submenus array.
Table A-3 Details of properties passed as the submenu structure
The addActions function also supports the ability to modify (or overwrite) existing menus via
its find property. Table A-4 shows details of the possible properties for the find object.
Table A-4 Properties of the find object
Adding new action menu in Version 6.5
Example A-7 shows the wrapper and helper functions for adding an action menu item in
Version 6.5 and the forms6.nsf database.
Example: A-7 Add new action wrapper functions for Version 6.5
// utility routine to insert submenus into submenu array or replace one entry
function insertSubmenus(a, submenus, offset) {
var bReplaceOne = (arguments.length >= 3);
var n = bReplaceOne ? offset : a.length;
if( bReplaceOne && !submenus[0].isDivider ){
/* If some info is missing, then use prior existing info */
var aTmp = a[n].split('|');
if( typeof submenus[0].title != "string" )
submenus[0].title = aTmp[0];
if( typeof submenus[0].helpText != "string")
submenus[0].helpText = aTmp[1] ? aTmp[1] : "";
if( typeof submenus[0].href != "string" )
submenus[0].href = a[n+1];
}
for(var j=0; j<submenus.length; j++) {
if( submenus[j].isDivider ) {
Parameter Description
title Same description as for top-level object.
href Same description as for top-level object.
helpText Same description as for top-level object.
isDivider Set to 1 or true to add a divider. (Do not specify other properties for this submenu.)
Parameter Description
title Visible text to use to find the action object we wish to update (should specify only
this or position).
pos Position number of the action object we wish to update (should specify only this
or title).
replace Set to 1 to replace an existing submenu entry.
subtitle Visible text for subtitle before which to insert specified submenus (or name of
single submenu to update if replace property is specified) (should specify only this
or suboffset).
suboffset Zero-based offset for submenu before which to insert specified submenus (or
location of single submenu to update if replace property is specified) (should
specify only this or subtitle).

Appendix A. Additional customization tips
125
a[n++] = "DIVIDER";
a[n++] = "";
} else {
a[n++] = submenus[j].title + "|" + submenus[j].helpText;
a[n++] = submenus[j].href;
}
if( bReplaceOne) break;
}
}
// Find specified action and then update it
function updateAction(a_Actions, findInfo, updateInfo) {
var i, action, j;
// First find the offest for this action
for(i=0; i<a_Actions.length; i++) {
action = a_Actions[i];
if(findInfo.title) {
if( typeof action.title == "string" ) {
if( findInfo.title == action.title ) break; else continue;
} else if ( findInfo.title == action.title[0] ) break; else continue;
return i;
} else {
if( findInfo.pos == action.pos )
break;
}
}
if( i >= a_Actions.length )
return;
// action is now the found entry
if( updateInfo.submenus ) {
var aSubMenu=action.href;
var nEntries=aSubMenu.length/2;
if( typeof findInfo.subtitle == "string" ){
for(j=0; j<nEntries; j++) {
if(aSubMenu[j*2].split("|")[0]==findInfo.subtitle ) {
findInfo.suboffset = j;
break;
}
}
}
if( typeof findInfo.suboffset == "number" ) {
if( findInfo.replace ) {
insertSubmenus(action.href, updateInfo.submenus, findInfo.suboffset);
} else {
// support inserting submenus at an offset
var aNewMenu=[];
var nInsertOffset = Math.min(findInfo.suboffset,nEntries);
if( nInsertOffset > 0 )
aNewMenu = aSubMenu.slice(0,nInsertOffset*2);
insertSubmenus(aNewMenu, updateInfo.submenus);
if( nInsertOffset < nEntries )

126
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
aNewMenu =
aNewMenu.concat(aSubMenu.slice(nInsertOffset*2,nEntries*2));
action.href=aNewMenu;
}
} else {
// insert all new submenus
action.href = [];
insertSubmenus(action.href, updateInfo.submenus);
}
}
// update position
if( typeof updateInfo.pos == "number")
action.pos = updateInfo.pos
// update title
if( typeof updateInfo.title == "string") {
if( typeof action.title == "string" )
action.title = updateInfo.title;
else
action.title[0] = updateInfo.title;
}
// update href
if( typeof updateInfo.href == "string") {
if( typeof action.title == "string" )
action.href = updateInfo.href;
else
action.title[1] = updateInfo.href;
}
}
// Function to add array of specified actions
//[{title:"New action", pos: 30, href:"javascript:...", helpText:"hover help
text", img:..., img_width:13,
// img_height: 15, submenus: [{title:"submenu1", href:"...", helpText:"some
text"}]}]
function addActions(a_Actions, a_ToAdd) {
var oNewEntry;
var sGif;
var n=0, i, j;
var title, href, helpText, sWidth, sHeight;
for(i=0; i<a_ToAdd.length; i++) {
oNewEntry = a_ToAdd[i];
if(oNewEntry.find) {
updateAction(a_Actions, oNewEntry.find, oNewEntry);
continue;
}
if(oNewEntry.img) {
/* First two chars represent img width and following two img height */
sWidth = oNewEntry.img_width + '';

Appendix A. Additional customization tips
127
if(sWidth.length > 2) sWidth = sWidth.substring(0,1);
if(sWidth.length < 2) sWidth = '0' + sWidth;
sHeight = oNewEntry.img_height + '';
if(sHeight.length > 2) sHeight = sHeight.substring(0,1);
if(sHeight.length < 2) sHeight = '0' + sHeight;
sGif = sWidth+sHeight+oNewEntry.img;
}
if( oNewEntry.img || oNewEntry.submenus ) {
title = [oNewEntry.title,oNewEntry.href,oNewEntry.helpText,sGif];
href = '';
helpText = '';
}
else {
title = oNewEntry.title;
href = oNewEntry.href;
helpText = oNewEntry.helpText;
}
if( oNewEntry.submenus ) {
href = [];
insertSubmenus(href,oNewEntry.submenus);
}
a_Actions[a_Actions.length] = {pos:oNewEntry.pos, title:title, href:href,
BTO:helpText};
}
}
Add new action
Example A-8 shows an example of adding an action menu using addActions wrapper
function.
Example: A-8 Add menu in Version 6.5
function Scene_Actions( s_SceneName, o_Window, a_Actions ){
...
switch(s_SceneName) {
case 'Mail':
// To add New → Account submenu
var a=[{find:{title:"New", suboffset:9}, submenus:[{title:"Account",
href:"javascript:openNewShimmerDoc('($ToDo)','Account')", helpText:"Create a new
account"}]}];
addActions(a_Actions, a);
// To add a top level menu with no submenus:
var a=[{title:"Hello world", pos: 30, href:"javascript:alert('Hello
world!')", helpText:"some hover text"}];
addActions(a_Actions, a);
// To add a top level menu with submenus:
var a=[{title:"Sub menus", pos:31, href:"javascript:alert('submenus')",
helpText:"submenu help", submenus: [{title:"submenu1",
href:"javascript:alert('submenu1 clicked')", helpText:"click me"},
{isDivider:true}, {title:"submenu2", href:"javascript:alert('submenu2 clicked')",
helpText:"click me"}]}];
addActions(a_Actions, a);

128
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
// To add a new top level image-based action
var a=[{title:"", pos:30, href:"javascript:launchCorporatePortal()",
helpText:"Open corporate portal",
img:"/iNotes/Forms6.nsf/h_ResourcesByName/corpportal.gif?OpenElement",
img_width:12, img_height:19}];
addActions(a_Actions, a);
// To find and update a top level menu named "New" and replace it with the
text "Create"
var a=[{find:{title:"New"}, title:"Create"}];
addActions(a_Actions, a);
break;
}
...
}
Adding new action menu in Version 7.0.1
Example A-9 shows the wrapper and helper functions for adding an action menu item in
Version 7.0.1 and the forms7.nsf database.
Example: A-9 Add new action wrapper and helper function in Version 7.0.1
// utility routine to insert submenus into submenu array
function insertSubmenus(menuNode, submenus, subpos) {
var j, submenuNode;
for(j=0; j<submenus.length; j++) {
submenuNode = Dbc(menuNode.$id);
with(submenuNode) {
if(submenus[j].isDivider)
CrR = true;/* isDivider */
else {
label = submenus[j].title;
onclick = submenus[j].href;
DFB = submenus[j].helpText;
}
if(subpos && subpos != -1)
pos = subpos;
}
}
}
function updateMenuNode(mn, o) {
// update position
if( typeof o.pos == "number")
mn.pos = o.pos
// update title
if( typeof o.title == "string")
mn.label = o.title
// update href
if( typeof o.href == "string")
mn.onclick = o.href;

Appendix A. Additional customization tips
129
// update tooltip
if( typeof o.helpText == "string")
mn.DFP = o.helpText;
}
// Find specified action and then update it
function updateAction(branchId, findInfo, updateInfo) {
var i, action, aSubMenu, nEntries, nInsertOffset, nAdj, nSubPos=-1;
// First find the offest for this action
if( typeof findInfo.pos != "undefined")
action = Dap(branchId, findInfo.pos);
else if (findInfo.title)
action = CyE(branchId, findInfo.title);
// action is now the found entry
if(!action)
return;
if( updateInfo.submenus ) {
aSubMenu= DZo(action.$branchId); /* DM_getBranch */
nEntries=aSubMenu.length;
// If title specified as insert point, find offset
if (typeof findInfo.subtitle == "string") {
menuNode = CyE(action.$branchId, findInfo.subtitle);
if(menuNode) {
for(i=0;i<nEntries;i++) {
if( aSubMenu[i] == menuNode.$id ) {
findInfo.suboffset = i;
break;
}
}
}
}
if( typeof findInfo.suboffset == "number" ) {
nInsertOffset = Math.min(findInfo.suboffset,nEntries);
nAdj = 100;
for(i=nInsertOffset;i<nEntries;i++) {
menuNode = DPN(aSubMenu[i]);
if( findInfo.replace ) {
updateMenuNode(menuNode,updateInfo.submenus[0]);
break;
} else {
if(nSubPos==-1)
nSubPos = menuNode.pos + 50;
menuNode.pos += nAdj;
}
}
} else {
// Remove all existing submenus
for(i=0;i<nEntries;i++)
DGa(aSubMenu[i]);

130
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
}
// insert all new submenus
if( !findInfo.replace )
insertSubmenus(action, updateInfo.submenus, nSubPos);
}
updateMenuNode(action, updateInfo);
}
// Function to add array of specified actions
//[{title:"New action", pos: 30, href:"javascript:...", helpText:"hover help
text", img:..., img_width:13,
// img_height: 15, submenus: [{title:"submenu1", href:"...", helpText:"some
text"}]}]
function addActions(s_TopBranchId, a_ToAdd) {
var oNewEntry;
var n=0, i, j;
var menuNode, submenuNode;
var subTitle;
for(i=0; i<a_ToAdd.length; i++) {
oNewEntry = a_ToAdd[i];
if( oNewEntry.find ) {
updateAction(s_TopBranchId, oNewEntry.find, oNewEntry);
continue;
}
menuNode = Dbc(s_TopBranchId);
with(menuNode) {
pos = oNewEntry.pos;
label = oNewEntry.title;
onclick = oNewEntry.href;
DFB = oNewEntry.helpText;
if( oNewEntry.img )
icon = oNewEntry.img + "|" + oNewEntry.img_width + "|" +
oNewEntry.img_height;
}
if( oNewEntry.submenus )
insertSubmenus(menuNode, oNewEntry.submenus)
}
}
Add new action
Example A-10 is an example of adding an action menu using the addActions wrapper
function.
Example: A-10 Add new action in Version 7.0.1
function Scene_Actions( s_SceneName, o_Window, s_TopBranchId ){
...
switch(s_SceneName) {
case 'Mail':

Appendix A. Additional customization tips
131
// Add a menu under the "New" action
var a=[{find:{title:"New", suboffset:9}, submenus:[{title:"Account",
href:"javascript:openNewShimmerDoc('($ToDo)','Account')", helpText:"Create a new
account"}]}];
addActions(s_TopBranchId, a);
// To add a top level menu with no submenus:
var a=[{title:"Hello world", pos: 30, href:"javascript:alert('Hello
world!')", helpText:"some hover text"}];
addActions(s_TopBranchId, a);
// To add a top level menu with submenus:
var a=[{title:"Sub menus", pos:31, href:"javascript:alert('submenus')",
helpText:"submenu help", submenus: [{title:"submenu1",
href:"javascript:alert('submenu1 clicked')", helpText:"click me"},
{isDivider:true}, {title:"submenu2", href:"javascript:alert('submenu2 clicked')",
helpText:"click me"}]}];
addActions(s_TopBranchId, a);
// To add a new top level image-based action
var a=[{title:"", pos:30, href:"javascript:launchCorporatePortal()",
helpText:"Open corporate portal",
img:"/iNotes/Forms6.nsf/h_ResourcesByName/corpportal.gif?OpenElement",
img_width:12, img_height:19}];
addActions(s_TopBranchId, a);
// To find and update a top level menu named "New" and replace it with the
text "Create"
var a=[{find:{title:"New"}, title:"Create"}];
addActions(s_TopBranchId, a);
break;
default:
break;
}
...
}
Overwriting action menu in Version 6.5
The addAction wrapper function also supports updating or overwriting menu actions. Use the
find property in order to overwrite menu actions.
Example: A-11 Overwrite New and New → Message in Version 6.5
function Scene_Actions( s_SceneName, o_Window, s_TopBranchId ){
...
switch(s_SceneName) {
case 'Mail':
// Overwrite top level New and the New -> Message menu

132
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
var a = [{find: {title:"New", subtitle:"Message", replace:1},
href:"javascript:showHeaderDialog()",
submenus:[{href:"javascript:showHeaderDialog()"}]}]
addActions(a_Actions, a);
break;
default:
break;
}
...
}
Overwriting action menu in Version 7.0.1
The addAction wrapper function also supports updating or overwriting menu actions. Use the
find property in order to overwrite menu actions.
Example: A-12 Overwrite New and New → Message in Version 7.0.1
function Scene_Actions( s_SceneName, o_Window, s_TopBranchId ){
...
switch(s_SceneName) {
case 'Mail':
// Overwrite the top level New and the New -> Message menu
var a = [{find: {title:"New", subtitle:"Message", replace:1},
href:"javascript:showHeaderDialog()", submenus:[{href:"
javascript:showHeaderDialog()"}]}]
addActions(s_TopBranchId, a);
break;
default:
break;
}
...
}

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2006. All rights reserved.
133
Appendix B.
Sneak preview: upcoming
features
B
Note: Any future capabilities, features, or products that are discussed within this Redpaper
appendix are current IBM plans, and are subject to change in whole or in part by IBM at
any time, without notice.

134
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
What is in Notes and Domino Version 7.0.2
This section shows the types of enhancements that are being designed for the upcoming
version of Domino Web Access. This list is provided to give readers a sense of the general
direction in which future releases are heading. This list is not a definitive list of future features
and may change at any time.
Domino Web Access support with Firefox 1.5
Macintosh users will be able to use Domino Web Access using the Mozilla Firefox 1.5, as
displayed Figure B-1. Beginning with 7.0.2, Mozilla Firefox 1.5 will also be supported for W32
and Linux.
Figure B-1 Domino Web Access through Macintosh client using Firefox
Improved database quota reporting
Domino Web Access 7.0.2 improves the database quota reporting by polling for quota
information when it polls for new mail or alarms, thereby updating the indicator. Previously
there was a tendency for this information to be accurate only the first time any particular
functional area page was displayed during a session.
Thread panel improvements
Domino Web Access 7.0.2 now offers the ability to display the thread panel when using the
"Show documents one page at a time" preference setting. The thread panel now supports
deleting entries selected within a thread panel list via a right-click action.

Appendix B. Sneak preview: upcoming features
135
UI for attention indicator
Beginning in Version 7.0.2, Domino Web Access users will be able to set attention indicators
through preferences under the Message Marking option, as shown in Figure B-2.
Figure B-2 Setting attention indicator under preferences
Advertise data as Atom and RSS feeds
Domino Web Access 7.0.2 can advertise data as Atom and RSS feeds for the inbox folder. By
default this feature is disabled. Feeds may be turned on by the following server notes.ini
settings:
iNotes_WA_Feeds=atom,rss (to enable both feed types)
iNotes_WA_Feeds=atom (only enable Atom feed)
iNotes_WA_Feeds=rss (only enable RSS)
When feeds are enabled, the mail page will be modified to advertise the existence of the feed
when someone goes to the inbox folder. Feed readers built into browsers, or browser
extensions, will then automatically detect that a link is present. For example, the Sage
Note: The Atom and RSS feeds are considered at this time to be only a
tech preview
for
Domino 7.02.

136
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
extension for Firefox will display the clickable image at the bottom right of the Firefox window,
as shown in Figure B-3.
Figure B-3 Firefox displays this clickable image
The advertised feed title will be the following format (if only one feed is advertised):
<db title>: <view title>
The advertised feed title will be the following format (if multiple feeds are advertised):
[<FEEDTYPE>] <db title>: <view title>
Where <FEEDTYPE> is either Atom or RSS. So from a feed reader one should be able to
see information about new messages that arrive and who they are from, and a link should be
offered to go to the document.

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2006. All rights reserved.
137
Appendix C.
Additional material
This Redpaper refers to additional material that can be downloaded from the Internet as
described below.
Locating the Web material
The Web material associated with this Redpaper is available in softcopy on the Internet from
the IBM Redbooks Web server. Point your Web browser to:
ftp://www.redbooks.ibm.com/redbooks/REDP4188
Alternatively, you can go to the IBM Redbooks Web site at:
ibm.com/redbooks
Select the Additional materials and open the directory that corresponds with the Redpaper
form number, REDP4188.
Using the Web material
The additional Web material that accompanies this Redpaper includes the following files:
File name Description
forms7.zip Forms7.nsf with the modifications shown in Chapter 4, “Skin
customization techniques” on page 43, and Chapter 5, “Feature
customization techniques” on page 65.
resource.zip Sample resource Lotus Notes database to store the copies of all
e-mails, as referred to in 5.3, “Overwrite New Message action” on
page 69.
qsagent.zip Contains QSMailStoreAgent.lss, as documented in 5.3.4, “Modify
s_MailMemoEdit subform” on page 75.
C

138
Domino Web Access 7 Customization
How to use the Web material
Create a subdirectory (folder) on your workstation, and unzip the contents of the Web
material zip file into this folder.
To use the provided databases you need to import the agent provided as
QSMailStoreAgent

into the mail files of the desired users or into the dwa7.ntf template for all users. This agent
has to be set as target
none
.
The next step is to copy the provided forms7.nsf to the iNotes directory of the Domino server.
Also, the repository has to be copied to the data directory on the Domino server.
Recycling the Domino server should now show the modified design and utilize the modified
functionality.
Attention: Before any modification to a production or even a test Domino environment is
made, all databases and templates should be backed up.

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2006. All rights reserved.
139
Related publications
The publications listed in this section are considered particularly suitable for a more detailed
discussion of the topics covered in this Redpaper.
IBM Redbooks
For information about ordering these publications, see “How to get IBM Redbooks” on
page 139. Note that some of the documents referenced here may be available in softcopy
only.
Domino Web Access 6.5 on Linux, SG24-7060
iNotes Web Access Deployment and Administration, SG24-6518
iNotes Web Access on the IBM Eserver iSeries Server, SG24-6553
Customizing QuickPlace, SG24-6000
Online resources
These Web sites and URLs are also relevant as further information sources:
Lotus Domino Web Access product page on IBM / Lotus site
http://www-142.ibm.com/software/sw-lotus/products/product1.nsf/wdocs/webaccessh
ome
How to get IBM Redbooks
You can search for, view, or download Redbooks, Redpapers, Hints and Tips, draft
publications and Additional materials, as well as order hardcopy Redbooks or CD-ROMs, at
this Web site:
ibm.com/redbooks
Help from IBM
IBM Support and downloads
ibm.com/support
IBM Global Services
ibm.com/services

140
Domino Web Access 7 Customization


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BUILDING TECHNICAL
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by the IBM International
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Organization. Experts from
IBM, Customers and Partners
from around the world create
timely technical information
based on realistic scenarios.
Specific recommendations
are provided to help you
implement IT solutions more
effectively in your
environment.
For more information:
ibm.com/redbooks
Redpaper
Domino Web Access 7
Customization
Integrate your
organization’s design
into Domino Web
Access
Extend and enhance
Domino Web Access
functionality
Leverage new Version
7 design capabilities
Lotus Domino Web Access 7 gives users the power to create rich text
messages, schedule meetings, manage tasks, and collaborate with
colleagues, whether they are using their own workstation, an Internet
kiosk, or another user's PC. Offline services for the security-rich
e-mail, collaboration, and personal information management features
of DWA allow a mobile workforce to maintain a high level of
productivity by expanding access to key information and applications.
This IBM Redpaper provides you with the knowledge that you need to
customize Domino Web Access to meet your organization’s needs,
whether you are an application developer or an administrator. It
contains different customization examples for new and additional
functionality, as well as removing and rearranging existing
components, to meet the design and compliance needs of a fictitious
bank.
Back cover
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