Windows NT Systems Management

An IBM Redbook Publication
IBM Redbook Form Number: SG24-2107-00
ISBN: 0738404675
ISBN: 9780738404677
Publication Date: 10-Jul-1997
Find Similar Download

Related People

Barry Nusbaum - Author [+3] [-3]
Leonardo Pires Frollini - Author
Lucas Fang - Author
Anders Ahl - Author

Abstract

This IBM Redbooks publication describes how to do systems management on the NT Server 4.0 platform using tools from Microsoft and IBM. Setting up IPX and SNA connectivity is also shown in this book. We show different NetWare clients, as well as use Microsoft SNA Version 3.0 to show how to set up SNA connectivity. There are examples of how to use each of the functions, as well as descriptions of the supporting details needed to enable the function. Simple scenarios are provided to show how to use each of the system management functions, as well as some complex examples showing how to integrate Lotus Notes user administration with Windows NT. In most cases the examples were done on the Windows platforms, but in some cases clients were OS/2 and NetWare. In addition, we used an AIX system to show some SNMP interaction.

The examples help the reader understand how to use the NT system management tools to manage and administer their environments better.

Language

English

Table of Content

Chapter 1. Overview of NT Systems Management 1.0
Chapter 2. SNMP Management 2.0
Chapter 3. Domain Management 3.0
Chapter 4. Protocol Management 4.0
Chapter 5. Performance Management 5.0
Chapter 6. SMS 6.0
Appendix A. SMS Files A.0
Appendix B. Windows NT Diagnostic Summary B.0
Appendix C. Special Notices C.0
Appendix D. Related Publications D.0
SG24-2107-00
Windows NT Systems Management
July 1997
Thi s soft copy for use by IBM empl oyees onl y.


International Technical Support Organization
Windows NT Systems Management
July 1997
SG24-2107-00
IBML
Thi s soft copy for use by IBM empl oyees onl y.

This soft copy for use by IBM employees only.
Take Note!
Before using this information and the product it supports, be sure to read the general information in
Appendi x C, “Special Notices” on page 279.
First Edition (July 1997)
This edition applies to TME 10 Version 3.1 and NT Server Version 4.0 for use with the Windows NT Operating
System.
Comments may be addressed to:
IBM Corporation, Internati onal Technical Support Organization
Dept. HZ8 Building 678
P.O. Box 12195
Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2195
When you send information to IBM, you grant IBM a non-exclusive right to use or distribute the information in any
way i t bel i eves appropri ate wi thout i ncurri ng any obl i gati on to you.
© Copyright International Business Machines Corporation 1997.All rights reserved.
Note to U.S. Government Users — Documentation related to restricted rights — Use, duplication or disclosure is
subject to restrictions set forth in GSA ADP Schedule Contract with IBM Corp.

This soft copy for use by IBM employees only.
Contents
Figures
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
vi i
Preface
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
xvii
The Team That Wrote This Redbook
........................
xvii
Comments Wel come
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
xvii
Chapter 1.Overview of NT Systems Management
.................
1
1.1 Hardware and Operating System Environment
................
1
1.2 Software Environment
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3
Chapter 2.SNMP Management
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5
2.1 NT MIB Values
...................................
5
2.1.1 LAN Manager MIB-II
.............................
6
2.1.2 Microsoft DHCP Server MIB
.........................
9
2.1.3 Microsoft Internet Information Server MIB
................
9
2.1.4 Microsoft WINS Server MIB
.........................
10
2.1.5 Microsoft SQL Server MIB
..........................
13
2.1.6 Lotus Notes Server MIB
...........................
14
2.2 SNMP Utilities in the NT Resource Kit
.....................
18
2.2.1 SNMPUTIL.EXE SNMP Browser
.......................
19
2.2.2 SNMP Moni tor
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
20
2.2.3 MIBCC.EXE
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21
2.2.4 PERF2MIB.EXE Performance Monitor MIB Builder Tool
........
21
Chapter 3.Domain Management
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
23
3.1 NT Web Administration
..............................
23
3.2 NT Management
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
27
3.2.1 Adding Users
..................................
28
3.2.2 Editing Users
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
31
3.2.3 Removing User Accounts
..........................
33
3.2.4 Adding Local Groups
.............................
34
3.2.5 Editing Groups
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
36
3.2.6 Removi ng Groups
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
38
3.2.7 Adding Global Groups
............................
40
3.2.8 Creating Shared Directories
.........................
41
3.2.9 Editing Share Permissions
..........................
47
3.2.10 Removi ng Shares
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
49
3.2.11 File System Management (File/Folder Permissions)
..........
50
3.2.12 Broadcasti ng Messages
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
53
3.2.13 Remote Consol e
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
55
3.2.14 Rebooting Servers
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
57
3.2.15 Printer Management
.............................
59
3.2.16 Device Management
.............................
62
3.2.17 Services Management
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
65
3.2.18 Sessions Management
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
67
3.2.19 Performance Management
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
69
3.2.20 Server Configuration
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
70
3.2.21 Web Administration Preferences
.....................
72
3.3 User Synchronization between Lotus Notes and Windows NT
.......
73
3.3.1 Installation of the User Synchronization
..................
74
3.3.2 User Synchronization Settings
.......................
75
©
Copyright IBM Corp. 1997
iii

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3.3.3 Adding Users
..................................
77
3.3.4 Creating Users
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
81
3.3.5 Deleting Users
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
86
3.3.6 Renaming Users from Windows NT
....................
92
Chapter 4.Protocol Management
...........................
95
4.1 SNA - IBM Personal Communications for Windows NT
...........
95
4.1.1 Installation of LLC2 Protocol
........................
96
4.1.2 SNA - IBM Communications Server for Windows NT
.........
105
4.1.3 SNA - Microsoft SNA Server for Windows NT
.............
119
4.1.4 IPX/SPX - Gateway (and Client) Services for NetWare
........
134
4.1.5 IPX/SPX - NetWare Client for Windows NT
...............
141
4.1.6 IBM Networks Coordinated Logon Client for NT
............
148
4.2 Network Moni tor
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
154
4.2.1 Capturing Data
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
155
4.2.2 Capturing Data with Filters
........................
161
4.2.3 View the Captured Data
..........................
162
Chapter 5.Performance Management
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
165
5.1 Windows NT Built-In Tools
...........................
165
5.1.1 Event Viewer
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
165
5.1.2 Performance Moni tor
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
168
5.1.3 Task Manager
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
178
5.2 NetFinity Moni tori ng
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
182
5.2.1 Al ert Manager
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
183
5.2.2 Process Manager
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
183
5.2.3 System Moni tor
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
184
5.3 Lotus Notes Performance
............................
188
5.3.1 Installing the Lotus Notes Performance Monitor
............
189
5.3.2 Un-Installing the Lotus Notes Performance Monitor
..........
190
5.3.3 Getting the Instances Up and Running
.................
190
5.3.4 What Instances Should You Monitor
...................
192
Chapter 6.SMS
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
193
6.1 Environment Setup
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
193
6.1.1 Site Planning and Design
.........................
193
6.1.2 Prerequi si tes Setup
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
195
6.1.3 SMS Installation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
199
6.1.4 SMS Clients Installation
..........................
210
6.2 Working with SMS
................................
217
6.2.1 The SMS Administrator
..........................
217
6.2.2 Packages and Jobs
.............................
226
6.2.3 Queries and Reports
............................
236
6.2.4 SMS Groups
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
241
6.2.5 Events and Alerts
..............................
245
6.2.6 Performing Inventory
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
253
6.2.7 Performing Software Distribution
.....................
260
6.2.8 Performing Remote Troubleshooting
..................
262
6.2.9 Performing Network Monitoring
......................
267
Appendix A.SMS Files
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
271
A.1 RUNSMS.BAT
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
271
Appendix B.Windows NT Diagnostic Summary
.................
275
iv
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Appendix C.Special Notices
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
279
Appendix D.Related Publications
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
281
D.1 International Technical Support Organization Publications
........
281
D.2 Redbooks on CD-ROMs
.............................
281
D.3 Other Publications
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
281
How to Get ITSO Redbooks
.............................
283
How IBM Employees Can Get ITSO Redbooks
..................
283
How Customers Can Get ITSO Redbooks
.....................
284
IBM Redbook Order Form
..............................
285
Index
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
287
ITSO Redbook Evaluation
...............................
289
Contents
v

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vi
Wi ndows NT Systems Management

This soft copy for use by IBM employees only.
Figures
1. LAN Manager MIB on TME 10 NetView
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7
2. LAN Manager MIB
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8
3. DHCP MIB
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9
4. IIS MIB
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10
5. WINS Server MIB
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12
6. SQL Server MIB
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
14
7. Lotus Notes SNMP Installation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15
8. Lotus Notes SNMP Installation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15
9. Lotus Notes SNMP Service
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
16
10.Lotus Notes SNMP Configuration Database
.................
16
11.Lotus Notes SNMP Configuration Database - Parameter View
......
16
12.Lotus Notes SNMP Configuration Database - SNMP Control Rights
...
17
13.Lotus Notes Server MIB
.............................
18
14.Output from SNMPUTIL Command
.......................
19
15.Moni tori ng Status
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
20
16.NT Web Administration: Main Screen
.....................
23
17.Web Administration: Installation Screen
...................
25
18.WWW Service Properties (Default Settings)
.................
25
19.Maintenance Selected with MSIE and Netscape Navigator
........
26
20.Web Administration: Logon Requester
....................
27
21.Windows NT: User Manager
..........................
28
22.Windows NT: New User
.............................
28
23.Syntax of the NET USER Command
......................
29
24.Syntax of the ADDUSERS.EXE Command
...................
29
25.Format of ASCII-file for Use with ADDUSERS.EXE
..............
30
26.Windows NT CMD: Adding a User with the ADDUSERS.EXE Command
.
30
27.Web Administration: User Accounts
......................
31
28.Web Administration: Create New User Account
...............
31
29.Windows NT: User Properties
..........................
32
30.Web Administration: User Properties
.....................
33
31.Windows NT: Delete User Requester
.....................
33
32.Windows NT CMD: Removing Users Using the ADDUSERS.EXE
Command
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
34
33.Web Administration: Delete User Account
..................
34
34.Windows NT: New Local Group
.........................
35
35.Syntax of the NET GROUP Command
.....................
35
36.Windows NT CMD: Creating a Group Using the ADDUSERS.EXE
Command
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
36
37.Web Administration: New Group Information
................
36
38.Windows NT: Local Group Properties
.....................
37
39.Example of Adding a User to a Group Using the NET GROUP Command 37
40.Web Administration: Group Memberships
..................
38
41.Windows NT: Delete Requester
.........................
38
42.Windows NT CMD: Removing Groups Using the ADDUSERS.EXE
Command
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
39
43.Web Administration: Group Accounts
.....................
39
44.Web Administration: Delete Group
.......................
39
45.Windows NT: New Global Group
........................
40
46.Windows NT CMD: ADDUSERS
.........................
41
47.Syntax of the RMTSHARE.EXE Command
...................
42
48.Windows NT CMD: Creating a Remote Share with RMTSHARE.EXE
...
42
©
Copyright IBM Corp. 1997
vii

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49.ShareUI: Shared Directories 1
.........................
43
50.ShareUI: Menu File - New - Share
.......................
43
51.ShareUI: New Share
...............................
44
52.ShareUI: Shared Directories 2
.........................
44
53.Windows NT: Share Properties
.........................
45
54.Windows NT CMD: NET SHARE Command
..................
46
55.Syntax of the NET SHARE Command
.....................
46
56.Web Administration: Shares
..........................
46
57.Web Administration: New Share Information
.................
47
58.Windows NT: Access through Share Permissions
..............
47
59.Windows NT: Add Users and Groups
.....................
48
60.Windows NT CMD: Editing Shares with the RMTSHARE Command
...
49
61.Windows NT CMD: NET SHARE /DELETE Command
............
50
62.Windows NT: Properties
.............................
51
63.Windows NT: Permissions
............................
51
64.Syntax of the CACLS.EXE Command
.....................
52
65.Web Administration: Select File/Folder
....................
52
66.Web Administration: Permissions for File/Folder
..............
53
67.Broadcast Message
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
53
68.Windows NT: Server Manager
.........................
53
69.Windows NT: Send Message
..........................
54
70.Syntax of the NET SEND Command
......................
54
71.Windows NT CMD: NET SEND Command
...................
54
72.Web Administration: Server Manager
.....................
55
73.Windows NT CMD: Remote Client Command
................
56
74.Syntax for the RCLIENT.EXE Command
....................
56
75.Web Administration: Remote Console
.....................
57
76.Windows NT: Shutdown Manager
.......................
58
77.Syntax for the SHUTDOWN.EXE Command
..................
58
78.Windows NT CMD: System Shutdown/Reboot Command
.........
59
79.Web Administration: Reboot Server
......................
59
80.Windows NT: Printers
..............................
60
81.Windows NT: Printer Status
...........................
60
82.Windows NT: Printer Job Manager
.......................
60
83.Syntax of the NET PRINT Command
......................
61
84.Windows NT CMD: Managing Printer Jobs Using the NET PRINT
Command
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
61
85.Web Administration: Printers
..........................
61
86.Web Administration: Print Jobs
.........................
62
87.Windows NT: Device Manager
.........................
62
88.Windows NT: Device Manager - Hardware Profiles
.............
63
89.Windows NT: Device Manager - Startup Type
................
63
90.Web Administration: Device Manager
.....................
64
91.Web Administration: Device Manager - Startup Type
............
64
92.Web Administration: Device Manager - Inconsistent Sorting
.......
64
93.Windows NT: Services
..............................
65
94.Windows NT: Service Startup
..........................
66
95.Web Administration: Service Manager
....................
66
96.Windows NT: User Sessions
..........................
67
97.Windows NT CMD: Managing Sessions Using the NET SESSION
Command
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
68
98.Syntax of the NET SESSION Command
....................
68
99.Web Administration: Sessions
.........................
68
100.Web Administration: Sessions - Information
.................
69
101.Web Administration: Performance Monitor Objects
.............
69
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102.Web Administration: Counters
.........................
70
103.Windows NT: Windows NT Diagnostics
....................
70
104.Web Administration: Configuration Category
.................
71
105.Web Administration: Server Configuration
..................
71
106.Web Administration: Preferences
.......................
72
107.Web Administration: Server Status
......................
73
108.Windows NT User Manager for Domains: Notes Menu Added
......
73
109.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: Installation
...............
74
110.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: Warning Message
...........
75
111.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: Notes Menu
...............
75
112.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: Enter Notes Password
........
75
113.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: Choose Notes Certifier ID
......
75
114.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: Notes Registration Setup
.......
76
115.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: Notes Mail/ID Registration Options
.
76
116.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: Notes User Deletion and Rename
Options
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
77
117.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: User Registry Confirmation
.....
77
118.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: Enter Notes User Information
....
78
119.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: Begin Registration
...........
78
120.Lotus Notes User Synchronization:
......................
78
121.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: Person Document in Lotus Notes
..
79
122.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: Selecting Multiple Users
.......
79
123.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: Registration Options
.........
79
124.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: Begin Registration
...........
80
125.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: Quick Installation
...........
80
126.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: New User Password Database
...
80
127.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: New User Passwords View
.....
80
128.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: New User Password
..........
81
129.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: Server Administration Menu
.....
81
130.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: Server Administration - Register
Person
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
82
131.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: License Question
...........
82
132.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: Register Person
............
82
133.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: Register Person - Basic Section
..
83
134.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: Register Person - Mail Section
...
83
135.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: User Record in Lotus Notes
.....
84
136.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: User Records in Windows NT
....
84
137.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: New User
................
85
138.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: Notes User Information
........
85
139.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: Person Document in Lotus Notes
..
86
140.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: Windows NT Delete User Requester 87
141.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: Administration Requests
.......
87
142.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: Pending Administrator Approval
Vi ew
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
88
143.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: Manual Approving of File Deletion
.
88
144.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: Verification of File Deletion
.....
88
145.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: Request Successful
..........
89
146.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: Action Button Delete Person
....
89
147.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: Delete Person Verification
......
89
148.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: Delete User Options
..........
89
149.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: Immediate or Via Administration
Process
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
90
150.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: Completed Successfully
.......
90
151.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: Administration Requests
.......
90
152.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: Pending Administrator Approval
..
91
Fi gures
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153.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: Approve File Deletion
.........
91
154.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: Performed Administration Requests 92
155.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: Network Account Name
.......
92
156.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: User Rename Menu
..........
93
157.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: Rename Requester
..........
93
158.Lotus Notes User Synchronization: Changed Network Account Name
..
93
159.Personal Communication for NT Information Dialog
............
96
160.IBM LLC2 Driver Installation Help
.......................
96
161.Network Protocol in Control Panel
.......................
97
162.Select Net Protocol
................................
97
163.Insert Disk
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
98
164.Personal Communication for NT
........................
98
165.Personal Communication for NT
........................
99
166.Information for Requiring Configuration
...................
100
167.Customi ze Communi cati on
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
100
168.Customize Communication - 3270 Host
...................
101
169.Configure Local System
............................
101
170.Configure LAN Connection
..........................
102
171.Configuration Complete
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
103
172.Save the Configuration File
..........................
103
173.Compl ete Customi zati on
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
104
174.Compl ete Customi zati on
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
104
175.Connect to IBM S/390 Host
..........................
105
176.IBM Communications Server for Windows NT
...............
106
177.Administrator and Configuration User ID
..................
106
178.Start Copying Files
...............................
107
179.Connect to IBM S/390 Host
..........................
107
180.Connect to IBM S/390 Host
..........................
108
181.SNA Node Configuration
............................
109
182.SNA Node Configuration - Help Window
..................
109
183.SNA Node Configuration - New Configuration
...............
110
184.SNA Node Configuration/TN3270E Server
..................
110
185.SNA Node Configuration/Define a Node
..................
111
186.SNA Node Configuration/Configure a Device
...............
112
187.SNA Node Configuration/Define a LAN Device
..............
112
188.SNA Node Configuration/Configure the Gateway
.............
113
189.SNA Node Configuration/Define a Gateway Configuration
........
114
190.SNA Node Configuration/Host Link Type
..................
114
191.SNA Node Configuration/Define a LAN Connection
............
115
192.SNA Node Configuration/Assign New LUs
.................
115
193.SNA Node Configuration/Host LU Definition
................
116
194.SNA Node Configuration/Assigned LUs
...................
117
195.SNA Node Configuration - TN3270E Parameter
..............
117
196.SNA Node Configuration/Save the Configuration
.............
118
197.Start a SNA Node
................................
118
198.A Started SNA Node
..............................
119
199.Microsoft SNA Server/Welcome
.......................
120
200.SNA Server/Manager
..............................
120
201.SNA Server/Help Window
...........................
121
202.SNA Server/Insert Link Service
.......................
121
203.SNA Server/DLC 802.2 Link Service Properties
..............
122
204.SNA Server - Link Service Added
......................
122
205.SNA Server
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
123
206.SNA Server - Link Service Added
......................
123
207.SNA Server/Connection Properties/General
................
124
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208.SNA Server/Connection Properties/Address
................
124
209.SNA Server/Connection Properties/System Identification
........
125
210.SNA Server/Connection Properties/802.2 DLC
...............
125
211.SNA Server/3270 LU Properties
.......................
126
212.SNA Server - LU Added
............................
126
213.SNA Server/LU Creation Wizard Part 1 of 2
................
127
214.SNA Server/LU Creation Wizard Part 2 of 2
................
127
215.SNA Server/Add Users and Groups
.....................
128
216.SNA Server/User with LUs
..........................
128
217.Client for SNA Server Setup
.........................
129
218.SNA Server Client/Select Components
...................
130
219.SNA Server Client/Select Client Server Protocol
.............
130
220.SNA Server Client/Client Mode
........................
131
221.SNA Server Client/Remote Server Names
.................
131
222.SNA Server Client
...............................
132
223.SNA Server Client/Client Configuration / Protocol
............
133
224.SNA Server Client/Client Configuration / Mode
..............
133
225.SNA Server Client/3270 Applet
........................
134
226.Network Services in Control Panel
......................
135
227.Add Gateway Service for NetWare
......................
135
228.Windows NT Setup
...............................
136
229.Copy Required Files
..............................
136
230.Gateway (and Client) Services for NetWare Installed
...........
137
231.System Restart Required - Network Settings Change
..........
137
232.Gate Service for NetWare in Control Panel
.................
138
233.Client Service for NetWare - Setup
.....................
139
234.Client Service for NetWare - Map Network Drive
.............
140
235.Run the NetWare Client for Windows NT - Installation Program
....
141
236.Novell NetWare Client 4.0 Installation
....................
142
237.Remove Microsoft Client for NetWare by Installation Program
.....
142
238.Copying Files
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
142
239.Installation Complete
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
143
240.NetWare Icon in Control Panel
........................
143
241.Network Service - Novell NetWare Client for Windows NT
........
144
242.Novell NetWare Client for Windows NT GUI/Login
............
144
243.Novell NetWare Client for Windows NT GUI/Connection
.........
145
244.Novell NetWare Client for Windows NT GUI/Script
............
145
245.Novell NetWare Client for Windows NT GUI/Variables
..........
146
246.Change Password
................................
146
247.Current NetWare Resources
.........................
147
248.Capture NetWare Printer Port
.........................
147
249.Map Network Drive
...............................
148
250.Network Services in Control Panel
......................
149
251.Select Network Service
............................
150
252.Insert Disk
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
150
253.Select IBM Networks Coordinated Logon Client for Windows NT
....
150
254.Copy IBM Networks Client for Windows NT Files
.............
151
255.IBM Networks Client Properties/General
..................
151
256.IBM Networks Client Properties/Advanced
.................
152
257.IBM Networks Client/Setup Message
....................
152
258.Network Services in Control Panel
......................
153
259.Network Services Binding
...........................
153
260.Network Settings Change
...........................
153
261.IBM Networks Client
..............................
154
262.Network Moni tor
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
155
Fi gures
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263.Network Monitor/Capturing Data
.......................
156
264.Network Monitor/Total Stats
.........................
157
265.Network Monitor/Session Stats
........................
158
266.Network Monitor/Session Stats/Edit Address
...............
158
267.Network Monitor/Session Stats
........................
159
268.Network Monitor/Station Stats
........................
159
269.Network Moni tor/Graph
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
160
270.Network Moni tor/Graph
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
161
271.Network Monitor/Capture Filter SAPs and ETYPEs
............
162
272.Network Moni tor/Graph
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
163
273.Event Vi ewer
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
165
274.Event Viewer/System, Security, Application
................
166
275.Event Vi ewer/Fi l ter
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
166
276.Event Viewer/Filter Events
...........................
167
277.Event Viewer/Detail Information
.......................
167
278.Performance Moni tor/Chart
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
168
279.Performance Moni tor/Al ert
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
169
280.Performance Moni tor/Log
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
169
281.Performance Moni tor/Report
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
170
282.Performance Moni tor/Chart/Add 1
......................
170
283.Performance Moni tor/Chart/Add 2
......................
171
284.Performance Moni tor/Chart/Hi stogram
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
171
285.Performance Moni tor/Chart/Opti ons
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
172
286.Performance Moni tor/Chart/Graph
......................
173
287.Performance Moni tor/Al ert/Add
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
173
288.Performance Moni tor/Al ert
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
174
289.Performance Moni tor/Al ert/Opti ons
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
174
290.Performance Moni tor/Log/Add
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
175
291.Performance Moni tor/Log
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
176
292.Performance Monitor/Start, Stop and Save
................
176
293.Performance Moni tor/Report
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
177
294.Performance Monitor/Data From
.......................
178
295.Task Manager/Appl i cati ons
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
179
296.Task Manager/Processes
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
180
297.Task Manager/Performance
..........................
181
298.NetFinity Service Manager
..........................
182
299.NetFinity/Alert Manager
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
183
300.NetFinity/Process Manager Icon
.......................
183
301.NetFinity Process Manager
..........................
184
302.NetFinity System Monitor Icon
........................
184
303.NetFinity/System Monitor/Select Visible Monitors
............
185
304.NetFinity/System Monitor/CPU Utilization
.................
186
305.NetFinity/System Monitor/Space Remaining
................
186
306.NetFinity/System Monitor/Property of Monitor
...............
187
307.NetFinity/System Monitor/Threshold Configuration
............
187
308.NetFinity/System Monitor/Notify Window
..................
188
309.Lotus Notes Performance Monitoring: Installing Performance Monitor 189
310.Lotus Notes Performance Monitoring: Add to Chart Requester
.....
191
311.Lotus Notes Performance Monitoring: Initializing Replica Statistics
..
191
312.Example of Domains within a Site
......................
193
313.Site Hierarchy Layout Example
........................
194
314.Event Log Setup Window
...........................
196
315.SQL Manager Logins Window
........................
198
316.Server Configuration/Options Dialog
....................
199
317.SMS Setup Initial Window
...........................
200
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318.SMS Setup Welcome Window
.........................
200
319.SMS Setup Registration Window
.......................
201
320.Installation Options in SMS Setup
......................
201
321.SMS Licensing Window
............................
202
322.SMS Prerequisites Window
..........................
202
323.SMS Installation Directory Selection Window
...............
202
324.SMS Components Selection Window
....................
203
325.SMS List of Installable Additional Components
..............
203
326.SMS Setup SQL Database Configuration Window
.............
204
327.SMS SQL Device Creation Window
.....................
204
328.SMS Primary Site Configuration Information Window
..........
205
329.SMS Setup Progress Window
.........................
205
330.SMS Network Monitor Deletion Window
..................
206
331.SMS Network Monitor Installation Window
.................
206
332.Control Panel′s Network Setting Dialog Started by SMS Setup
.....
207
333.Network Service Selection Window
.....................
207
334.SMS Setup Successful Completion Window
................
208
335.SMS Program Group Created by the Setup Program
...........
208
336.SMS Services Created by the Setup Program
...............
208
337.SMS Service Startup Properties
.......................
209
338.SMS Shares Created by the Setup Program
................
209
339.Output from SMS Client Manual Installation
................
210
340.NT Server Properties Window
........................
211
341.NT Directory Replication Properties Window
................
212
342.SMS Domains Window
.............................
212
343.SMS Domain Properties Window
.......................
213
344.SMS Clients Properties Window
.......................
213
345.SMS Event Describing Insufficient Privileges
...............
214
346.SMS Package Command Manager
......................
215
347.SMS MIF Entry Program
............................
216
348.SMS Client Program Group in Windows NT 3.51
.............
216
349.SMS Client Program Group in Windows 95
.................
217
350.SMS Administrator Program Group
.....................
218
351.SMS Administrator Login Window
......................
218
352.Open SMS Window
...............................
219
353.SMS Sites Window
...............................
220
354.SMS Site Properties Window
.........................
220
355.SMS Inventory Properties Window
......................
221
356.SMS Client Properties Window
........................
221
357.SMS Client Remote Troubleshooting Properties Window
........
222
358.SMS Services Properties Window
......................
223
359.SMS Account Properties Window
......................
223
360.SMS Parent Site Properties Window
.....................
224
361.SMS Domains Window for a Site
.......................
224
362.SMS Domain Properties Window for Each Domain
............
225
363.SMS Server Properties Window
.......................
225
364.SMS Packages Window
............................
226
365.SMS Package Properties Window
......................
226
366.SMS Setup Package for Workstations Window
...............
227
367.SMS Command Line Properties Window
..................
227
368.Warning on Sharing Directories Across Systems
.............
227
369.SMS Setup Package for Sharing Window
..................
228
370.SMS Program Item Properties Window
...................
228
371.SMS Setup Package for Inventory Window
.................
229
372.Sample PDF File for Microsoft Office 95
...................
231
Fi gures
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373.SMS Jobs Window
...............................
232
374.SMS Job Properties Window
.........................
233
375.SMS Job Details Window
...........................
233
376.SMS Mandatory Job Execution Warning
..................
234
377.SMS Job Schedule Window
..........................
234
378.SMS Job Status Window
............................
235
379.SMS Job Status Details Window
.......................
235
380.Event Details
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
236
381.SMS Queries Window
.............................
237
382.SMS Query Properties Window
........................
237
383.SMS Query Expression Properties Window
................
238
384.SMS Query Properties Window
........................
238
385.Inactive Personal Computers Query
.....................
239
386.SMS Execute Query Window
.........................
239
387.SMS Query Results Window
.........................
239
388.SMS Define Query Result Formats Window
................
240
389.SMS Define Query Result Format Properties Window
..........
241
390.SMS Program Group Properties Window
..................
242
391.SMS Program Group Packages Window
..................
242
392.SMS Program Group Properties Window
..................
243
393.SMS Program Group User Groups Window
................
243
394.SMS Program Group Warning
........................
244
395.SMS Groups
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
244
396.Query Properties to Generate Alert
.....................
245
397.SMS Alert Properties Window
........................
246
398.SMS Alert Query Window
...........................
246
399.SMS Alert Actions Window
..........................
246
400.SMS Event Resulting from Alert
.......................
247
401.SMS Alert Message
..............................
247
402.SMS SNMP Traps Properties Window
....................
248
403.SMS SNMP Trap Filter Properties Window
.................
248
404.SMS SNMP Traps Window
..........................
249
405.Traps Details
...................................
249
406.Win NT Administrative Tools, Event to Trap Translator
.........
250
407.Loading Trap Configuration Window
.....................
250
408.Event to Trap Translator Window
.......................
251
409.Event Properties
.................................
252
410.Event to Trap Translator Settings
......................
253
411.SMS Personal Computer Properties Window
...............
254
412.NetFinity Software Inventory
.........................
255
413.Inventoried Package
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
255
414.Software Auditing Job in Package Command Manager in Win NT 3.51 257
415.Software Auditing Running on Windows NT 3.51
.............
258
416.Software Auditing Running on Windows 95
.................
258
417.Audited Software Shown in Computer Inventory
.............
259
418.SMS MIF Form Generator
...........................
259
419.Customized Inventory Data
..........................
260
420.Package Definition File for Lotus Notes Client
...............
261
421.Unattended Installation Script CLIENT32.BAT
...............
261
422.Unattended Installation Response File CLIENT32.RSP
..........
262
423.Network Properties Window, NetBIOS Interface Parameters on
Windows NT V4
.................................
264
424.SMS Help Desk Options Window
.......................
265
425.SMS Personal Computer Properties - Help Desk
.............
265
426.SMS Help Desk Window (Quick Windows Viewer)
............
266
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427.Being Accessed Warning
...........................
267
428.Personal Computer Properties Window, Network Monitoring
......
268
429.Network Monitor Window
...........................
269
Fi gures
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xvi
Wi ndows NT Systems Management

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Preface
This redbook describes how to do systems management on the NT Server 4.0
platform using tools from Microsoft and IBM.Setting up IPX and SNA
connectivity is also shown in this book.We show different NetWare clients, as
well as used Microsoft SNA Version 3.0 to show how to set up SNA connectivity.
There are examples of how to use each of the functions, as well as descriptions
of the supporting details needed to enable the function.Simple scenarios are
provided to show you how to use each of the systems management functions, as
well as some complex examples showing how to integrate Lotus Notes user
administration with Windows NT.In most cases the examples were done on the
Windows platforms, but in some cases clients were OS/2 and NetWare.In
addition, we used an AIX system to show some SNMP interaction.
The examples help the reader understand how to use the NT system
management tools to manage and administer their environments better.
The Team That Wrote This Redbook
This redbook was produced by a team of specialists from around the world
working at the Systems Management and Networking ITSO Center, Raleigh.
Barry D. Nusbaum is a Senior International Technical Support representative at
the Systems Management and Networking ITSO Center, Raleigh.He writes
extensively and teaches IBM classes worldwide on all areas of TME systems
management on the NT and AIX platform.Before joining the ITSO four years
ago, he worked in Professional Services in the United States as a National
Communications Specialist.
Leonardo Pires Frollini is a senior product and systems specialist at the IBM
Software Division in Brazil.He has six years of experience in systems and
network management.His areas of expertise include the Tivoli framework and
correlated products in AIX, NT and OS/2.
Lucas Fang is an Availability I/T Specialist in Taiwan.He has several years of
experience in the UNIX field.He holds a Masters of Computer Science and
Information Engineering degree from National Chiao Tung University at Taiwan.
He has worked at IBM for two years.His areas of expertise include MVS, OS/2
and LAN.
Anders Ahl is a systems specialist in Sweden.He has several years of
experience in the Windows NT field.His areas of expertise include Lotus Notes
and LAN/WAN design.
Comments Welcome
Your comments are important to us!
We want our redbooks to be as helpful as possible.Please send us your
comments about this or other redbooks in one of the following ways:

Fax the evaluation form found in “ITSO Redbook Evaluation” on page 289 to
the fax number shown on the form.
©
Copyright IBM Corp. 1997
xvii

This soft copy for use by IBM employees only.

Use the electronic evaluation form found on the Redbooks Home Pages at
the following URLs:
For Internet users
http://www.redbooks.ibm.com
For IBM Intranet users
http://w3.itso.ibm.com

Send us a note at the following address:
redbook@vnet.ibm.com
xviii
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Chapter 1.Overview of NT Systems Management
This chapter provides an overview of this redbook, as well as provides details on
the hardware and software that was used throughout the book to perform the
scenarios.Each example only used a subset of the environment.
In this book we cover systems management functions that are used on the NT
platform.We used the built-in functions that came with Windows NT Server, as
well as products (and supporting products) from Microsoft and IBM.Some of the
add-ons follow:

NT Resource Kit

System Management Server (SMS)

SQL as a supporting tool

TME 10 NetView for AIX

TME 10 NetView for NT

NetFinity

Communications Server for NT

IBM Network Client

Lotus Notes
In this book we address the following:

SNMP management

Web-based user and domain management

Protocol management

Performance management

Using SMS to assist with management
1.1 Hardware and Operating System Environment
The following table shows the hardware that was used in this residency.We did
not add or subtract any hardware in this residency to make a particular example
work properly.
©
Copyright IBM Corp. 1997
1

This soft copy for use by IBM employees only.
OSPatches
410PT7, DS410A, INS224, LIBUPC,
NAM41B, NWAMN2, SMSUP6,
SRVMN1, STRTL5
Service Pack 1 & 2
Service Pack 2
Service Pack 1 & 2
Service Pack 2
Service Pack 2
Service Pack 2
Service Pack 4
Service Pack 2
Service Pack 2
OSVersion
4.1
4.0
4.0
4.0
3.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
3.51
4.0
4.0
OSType
NovellNetWare
WindowsNT
Workstation
WindowsNT
Server
WindowsNT
Workstation
OS/2
WarpServer
Windows95
WindowsNT
Server
WindowsNT
Workstation
WindowsNT
Server
WinNTServer
WindowsNT
Server
WindowsNT
Server
Model
PS/2 77, 500 MB, 32 MB
IBM PC Server 520, 2 GB, 32 MB
IBM PS/2 9595
IBM TP755CD, 500 MB, 24 MB
PS/2 77, 500 MB, 32 MB
PS/2 77, 500 MB, 24 MB
IBM PC350-133, 1 GB, 80 MB
IBM TP755CE, 1 GB
IBM PC350-133, 1.2 GB, 80 MB
IBM PS2/77, 500 MB, 24 MB
IBM PC350-133, 1.2 GB, 80 MB
IBM TP760E, 1 GB, 48 MB
IPAddress
9.24.104.114
9.24.104.120
9.24.104.103
9.24.105.111
9.24.104.112
9.24.104.113
9.24.104.38
9.24.104.54
9.24.104.68
9.24.104.69
9.24.104.80
9.24.104.87
Table 1. HardwareandOperatingSystem
Hostname
netw114
netviewnt
ntdomc
smsmon
warpsrvr
window95
winnt38
winnt54
winnt68
winnt69
winnt80
winnt87
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Wi ndows NT Systems Management

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1.2 Software Environment
The following table shows the software that was used in this residency.We did
not do any operating system performance tuning to make any example run
better.We took all system defaults during the installation process and tailored
the systems to our needs, as the examples in the following chapters show.
Chapter 1.Overvi ew of NT Systems Management
3

This soft copy for use by IBM employees only.
SoftwarePatches
410pt7,libupc
telnetdpatch
telnetdpatch
telnetdpatch
Service Pack 2
Service Pack 2
SMS 1.2 Service Pack 1, SQL Server 6.5 Service Pack 1
Service Pack 2
telnetdpatch
telnetdpatch
Software
NetWareV4.1
Windows NT Resource Kit 4.0 Server, NetView 5.0
(pre-Release)
Windows NT Resource Kit 4.0 Server
Windows NT Resource Kit 4.0 Server, SMS Client 1.2
NetFinity Service 5.0
SMS Client 1.2, NetFinity Service 5.0
IBM Communications Server 5.0, IBM Personal
Communications 4.1, IBM Network Client 4.1, NetFinity
5.0
IBM Personal Communications 4.1, NetFinity Service
5.0
SMS 1.2, SQL Server 6.5
SMS Client 1.2
Windows NT Resource Kit 4.0 Server, Lotus Notes
Domino 4.51
Windows NT Resource Kit 4.0 Server, Lotus Notes
Domino 4.51
Role
Server
Workstation
PDC for Domain
NTDOM
Workstation
Server
Workstation
Server
Workstation
PDC for Domain
Management
Server
Server
Server
Table 2. RoleandSoftware
Hostname
netw114
netviewnt
ntdomc
smsmon
warpsrvr
window95
winnt38
winnt54
winnt68
winnt69
winnt80
winnt87
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Wi ndows NT Systems Management

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Chapter 2.SNMP Management
This chapter documents the built-in SNMP functions in Windows NT, as well as
other SNMP functions that can be added to the base operating system.
Windows NT provides many management functions using SNMP.It is possible,
for example, to access management data about components such as the server
and the DHCP service.There are tools offered by the NT Resource Kit that allow
monitoring and customization of SNMP to suit each environment.We describe
these functions and their applicability in the following paragraphs.
The SNMP.EXE program is responsible for the SNMP services in Windows NT.
SNMP.EXE runs as an NT service, and must be enabled either during Windows
NT installation or through the Services tab in the Network dialog contained in the
Control Panel.
The services provided by SNMP.EXE are complemented by DLLs that extend its
scope to manage WINS, DHCP, Internet components and LAN Manager functions.
These DLLs work as SNMP subagents and communicate with the SNMP service
through an agent API.Any DLL or application can use this API to extend the
functions of the SNMP service.The following table shows SNMP functions
versus DLL names:
Table 3. SNMPMIBsandRespectiveDLLs
The following registry key assigns DLLs to the SNMP service:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\SNMP\Parameters\ExtensionAgents
The DLLs are only available if the corresponding software is installed on the
machi ne.(For example, WINS.DLL is only available if the WINS server is
installed.)
LAN Manager MIB LMMIB2.DLL
DHCP Server MIB DHCPMIB.DLL
Internet Informati on Server MIB IIS.DLL
MIB-II INETMIB1.DLL
WINS Server MIB WINSMIB.DLL
SQL Server MIB (available from SQL server) SQLSNMP.DLL
Lotus Notes server MIB (available from www.lotus.com) NVMIBDLL.DLL
2.1 NT MIB Values
All the information manipulated by SNMP is stored in the Management
Information Base (MIB).The SNMP service provided by NT and the Resource Kit
includes MIB-II (based on RFC1213), the LAN Manager MIB and three proprietary
MIBs: DHCP, WINS and the Internet Information Server MIB.Additional products
such as SQL Server provide an additional MIB tree and SNMP subagent to
extend its management capabilities.We describe the following MIBs:

LAN Manager MIB-II

Microsoft DHCP Server MIB

Microsoft Internet Information Server MIB
©
Copyright IBM Corp. 1997
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Microsoft WINS Server MIB

Microsoft SQL Server MIB

Lotus Notes Server MIB
2.1.1 LAN Manager MIB-II
This MIB allows management of file serving parameters in computers running
Windows NT′s predecessor LAN Manager.However, it is still supported in
Windows NT with LMMIB2.DLL.
The LAN Manager MIB branch is under:
.iso.org.dod.internet.private.enterprises.
A lot of useful management information and statistics may be obtained from the
LAN Manager MIB-II.The MIB tree branches into four items: common, server,
workstation and domain.
The
common branch contains mainly software version information and network
I/O information.The
comType variable shows the machine role according to the
following table:
Role Bit Set Example (0xB octet)
-------------- ------- -------------------
Workstation 0 1
Server 1 1
SQL Server 2 0
Primary DC 3 1
Backup DC 4 0
Time Source 5 0
AFP Server 6 0
NetWare Server 7 0
The comType variable is a four-octet string.The above information is stored in
the first octet.Each bit of the octet will be set according to the computer role.
Refer to the above table for the following example.
A computer with the first octet of comType set to 0xB would have its bits set to
0000 1011; therefore having the roles for workstation, server and primary domain
controller (DC).Although there is an option for SQL Server, comType did not
report SQL Server V6.5 in our examples.
Network I/O statistics in this branch show the number of submitted operations
and failed operations.
The
server branch contains most of the important data in the MIB.Tables in this
branch list the services running (svSvcTable), client sessions established
(svSessTable), defined users (svUserTable), shares (svShareTable) and print
queues (svPrintQTable).There are also statistics on the number of opens, bytes
sent and received and buffer requests.
Following is what the MIB looks like when using the MIB Browser application on
TME 10 NetView:
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Figure 1. LANManager MIBonTME10NetView
The workstation branch documents requests that the managed machine makes
as a client to other machines.For example, it can show you the LAN
connections that you would see if you had issued the
net use
command (in
wkstaUseTable).In addition, it shows you request statistics and connection
failures.
The last branch of the LAN Manager MIB shows domain data.The variable
domPrimaryDomain displays which domain the machine belongs to, and
domLogonDomain shows which domain the machine is currently logged on to.
Domain controllers provide information to the domLogonTable, documenting
each processed logon.
The structure of the LAN Manager MIB is as follows:
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1 lanmgr-2
1 common
1 comVersionMaj
2 comVersionMin
3 comType
4 comStatStart
5 comStatNumNetIOs
6 comStatFiNetIOs
7 comStatFcNetIOs
2 server
1 svDescription
2 svSvcNumber
3 svSvcTable
4 svStatOpens
5 svStatDevOpens
6 svStatQueuedJobs
7 svStatSOpens
8 svStatErrorOuts
9 svStatPwErrors
10 svStatPermErrors
11 svStatSysErrors
12 svStatSentBytes
13 svStatRcvdBytes
14 svStatAvResponse
15 svSecurityMode
16 svUsers
17 svStatReqBufsNeeded
18 svStatBigBufsNeeded
19 svSessionNumber
20 svSessionTable
21 svAutoDisconnects
22 svDisConTime
23 svAuditLogSize
24 svUserNumber
25 svUserTable
26 svShareNumber
27 svShareTable
28 svPrintQNumber
29 svPrintQTable
3 workstation
1 wkstaStatSessStarts
2 wkstaStatSessFails
3 wkstaStatUses
4 wkstaStatUseFails
5 wkstaStatAutoRecs
6 wkstaErrorLogSize
7 wkstaUseNumber
8 wkstaUseTable
4 domain
1 domPrimaryDomain
2 domLogonDomain
3 domOtherDomainNumber
4 domOtherDomainTable
5 domServerNumber
6 domServerTable
7 domLogonNumber
8 domLogonTable
Figure 2. LANManager MIB
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2.1.2 Microsoft DHCP Server MIB
The DHCP server MIB allows monitoring of DHCP server parameters using
SNMP.The MIB variables that you can get are related to the address ranges
and the availability of addresses.Two basic branches make up the DHCP MIB:
dhcpPar and dhcpScope.
The dhcpPar branch contains information regarding the DHCP server start time
and counters for parameters such as discovery messages, requests, releases
and declines.
The dhcpScope branch is a table with address range information.Each entry in
the table shows the range of subnet address and utilization within each range
(for example, number of addresses in use and the number of free addresses).
For example, monitoring of the number of free addresses may trigger automatic
notification or action when this value shows that there are no free addresses
remai ni ng.
The structure of the DHCP MIB is as follows:
1 iso
3 org
6 dod
1 internet
1 directory
2 mgmt
3 experimental
4 private
1 enterprises
311 microsoft
1 software
3 dhcp
1 dhcpPar
1 parDhcpStartTime
2 parDhcpTotalNoOfDiscovers
3 parDhcpTotalNoOfRequests
4 parDhcpTotalNoOfReleases
5 parDhcpTotalNoOfOffers
6 parDhcpTotalNoOfAcks
7 parDhcpTotalNoOfNacks
8 parDhcpTotalNoOfDeclines
2 dhcpScope
1 scopeTable
1 scopeTableEntry
1 subnetAdd
2 noAddInUse
3 noAddFree
4 noPendingOffers
Figure 3. DHCPMIB
2.1.3 Microsoft Internet Information Server MIB
The IIS MIB provides monitoring statistics for gopher, gateway, FTP and http
services.This branch starts at
.iso.org.dod.internet.private.enterprises.microsoft.software, with four key pieces
of information: ftpStatistics, httpServer, gopherServer and GatewayServer.
FTP and gopher statistics under their respective branches cover bytes and files
sent and received, connection counters for anonymous and non-anonymous
users and attempts for connections and logons.Variables worth watching could
be the current number of users and connections (currentAnonymousUsers,
currentNonAnonymousUsers and currentConnecions) instead of the maximum
allowed number of users and connections (maxAnonymousUsers,
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maxNonAnonymousUsers and maxConnecions).This way access to the
FTP/gopher servers can be guaranteed with some capacity planning.Also, for
security purposes, logonAttempts should document hacking endeavors.
The httpServer branch reports same statistics at the FTP and gopher branch plus
http requests and errors such as totalGets, totalPosts, totalHeads,
totalCGIRequests and totalNotFoundErrors.Moni tori ng
not found errors may
help detect HTML mistakes, while the total statistics will allow for capacity
planning.
Internet gateway statistics also present bytes and files sent and received, as well
as user and connection information.Counters are available for FTP, gopher and
http requests.Three counters are used to provide summaries for Internet
requests, fetches and cache fetches.
A partial structure of the Internet Information Server MIB looks like:
1 iso
3 org
6 dod
1 internet
1 directory
2 mgmt
3 experimental
4 private
1 enterprises
311 microsoft
1 software
7 internetServer
1 inetSrvCommon
2 ftpServer
3 httpServer
4 gopherServer
5 GatewayServer
Figure 4. IISMIB
2.1.4 Microsoft WINS Server MIB
This MIB allows WINS monitoring and management including parameter setup
using SNMP.If you are not familiar with WINS, read the
Microsoft Windows NT
Server Networking Guide
in the NT Resource Kit documentation for a detailed
description of WINS and its concepts.This MIB is very specific to WINS and
requires some understanding of the Windows Internet Naming Service.
The WINS MIB branches into the par, pull, push, datafiles and cmd subtrees.
The par subtree contains WINS server statistics on its address synchronization
functions and parameters.There are statistics on when scavenging (database
backup and maintenance) and replication takes place, counters for total number
of requests and failures and also WINS parameters such as path names and
backup options.
The pull and push branches hold tables listing WINS pull and push partners
addresses.
The cmd branch allows WINS settings to be modified with SNMP set commands.
The following table shows each of the available commands and their functions.
cmdPullTrigger
Causes WINS to pull the specified IP address
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Table 4. WINSServer MIBVariables
The structure of the WINS Server MIB is as follows:
cmdPushTrigger
Causes WINS to push a notification message to the specified IP
address
cmdDeleteWins
Deletes local WINS information regarding the specified WINS
address.
cmdDoScavenging
Starts WINS scavenging.
cmdDoStaticInit
Causes WINS to do static initialization.
cmdNoOfWrkThds
Sets the number of work thread in WINS.
cmdPriorityClass
Sets WINS priority class (normal or high).
cmdResetCounters
Resets WINS counters.
cmdDeleteDbRecs
Deletes all data records (only data records) pertaining to the
specified WINS address in the local database.
cmdDRPopulateTable
Triggers collection of cmdDRDataRecordsTable for the
specified WINS address.
cmdDRDataRecordsTable
This table is collected when cmdDRPopulateTable is set, and
contains data records from the specified WINS address.
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2 wins
1 par
1 parWinsStartTime
2 parLastPScvTime
3 parLastATScvTime
4 parLastTombScvTime
5 parLastVerifyScvTime
6 parLastPRplTime
7 parLastATRplTime
8 parLastNTRplTime
9 parLastACTRplTime
10 parLastInitDbTime
11 parLastCounterResetTime
12 parWinsTotalNoOfReg
13 parWinsTotalNoOfQueries
14 parWinsTotalNoOfRel
15 parWinsTotalNoOfSuccRel
16 parWinsTotalNoOfFailRel
17 parWinsTotalNoOfSuccQueries
18 parWinsTotalNoOfFailQueries
19 parRefreshInterval
20 parTombstoneInterval
21 parTombstoneTimeout
22 parVerifyInterval
23 parVersCounterStartValLowWord
24 parVersCounterStartValHighWord
25 parRplOnlyWCnfPnrs
26 parStaticDataInit
27 parLogFlag
28 parLogFileName
29 parBackupDirPath
30 parDoBackupOnTerm
31 parMigrateOn
2 pull
1 pullInitTime
2 pullCommRetryCount
3 pullPnrTable
3 push
1 pushInitTime
2 pushRplOnAddChg
3 pushPnrTable
4 datafiles
1 dfDatafilesTable
5 cmd
1 cmdPullTrigger
2 cmdPushTrigger
3 cmdDeleteWins
4 cmdDoScavenging
5 cmdDoStaticInit
6 cmdNoOfWrkThds
7 cmdPriorityClass
8 cmdResetCounters
9 cmdDeleteDbRecs
10 cmdDRPopulateTable
11 cmdDRDataRecordsTable
12 cmdWinsVersNoLowWord
13 cmdWinsVersNoHighWord
Figure 5. WINSServer MIB
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2.1.5 Microsoft SQL Server MIB
The SQL Server MIB is a read-only MIB containing descriptions and statistics on
SQL Server and its resources.It is based on RFC1697, the SNMP Relational
Database MS-MIB, with enhancements added by Microsoft.This MIB is made up
of eight tables:

mssqlSrvTable
This table contains SQL product information, such as product name and
version number.

mssqlSrvInfoTable
This table documents server performance statistics, as well as general
information such as server name and server startup time.

mssqlSrvConfigParamTable
This is a table containing SQL Server configuration parameters.Its format
stores one table entry for each parameter. It contains the parameter name,
maximum and minimum configuration value, current parameter value and
current run parameter value.

mssqlSrvDeviceTable
All devices defined in SQL Server are listed and described in this table,
including its logical and physical name, device type, size and media type.

mssqlDbTable
Lists all databases in SQL Server.Each entry is comprised of a DB ID, DB
name and DB state.

mssqlDbInfoTable
This table details information for each accessible database in SQL Server,
such as owner, size and allocated space.

mssqlDbOptionTable
Possible database options for each database are listed in this table.For
each option, mssqlDbOptionSetName indicates whether it is set or not.

mssqlDbDeviceTable
This table lists device fragments used by each SQL Server database.
The structure of the SQL Server MIB is as follows:
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3 experimental
4 private
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1 software
4 apps
1 SQLServer
1 SQLServerObjects
1 mssqlSrvTable
2 mssqlSrvInfoTable
3 mssqlSrvConfigParamTable
4 mssqlSrvDeviceTable
5 mssqlDbTable
6 mssqlDbInfoTable
7 mssqlDbOptionTable
8 mssqlDbDeviceTable
Figure 6. SQLServer MIB
2.1.6 Lotus Notes Server MIB
The Lotus Notes Server MIB is provided by the NotesView SNMP Agent.
NotesView is a Lotus product used for managing Notes servers. It is based on
SNMP managers such as NetView for AIX and OpenView for Windows.Its SNMP
agent offers extensive management capabilities, including detailed statistics and
a few remote operation functions.
2.1.6.1 Installing the Lotus Notes SNMP Agent
The Lotus Notes SNMP Agent is free of charge and can be downloaded from the
Lotus Web site. Use http://www.lotus.com as the starting point for finding the
current page.At the time of this project, we used Notes 4.5 and found the agent
at: http://www.lotus.com/dir_mktg/SNMP45.htm.The archive (NTAGNT45.EXE)
contains the following files:
Filename Description
LNSNMP.EXE Lotus Notes SNMP Agent service.
LSNMPCFG.NSF Lotus Notes SNMP Agent configuration database.
MSVCRT20.DLL Microsoft Visual C++ Run Time library.
NINTRCPT.EXE Lotus Notes Event Interceptor. A Notes executable module.
NOTES.MIB Lotus Notes MIB file.
NOTES.TDF Lotus Notes Trap Definition File
NQURYSET.EXE Lotus Notes Query/Set Handler. A Notes executable module.
NREFLECT.EXE Lotus Notes Mail Probe Reflector Agent. A Notes executable module.
NVINST.EXE The installation program.
NVMIBDLL.DLL Lotus Notes SNMP Sub Agent
Prior to the installation, you are required to have the SNMP service started and
configured. Please see the Windows NT manuals on how to do this.
After you download the agent you will need to take the following steps:
1. Unpack the agent to a temporary directory.
2. Make sure your Lotus Notes di rectory is i n the search PATH.
3. If you have the Notes Server task running,shut it down.
4. Execute the installation program (
NVINST.EXE
).
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Figure 7. LotusNotesSNMPInstallation
5. If you onl y want the SNMP agent,select Installation Option 1.
Figure 8. LotusNotesSNMPInstallation
6. If you don′t have the Reporter task configured i n your NOTES.INI file,the
installation program allows you to add it now.
7. The installation is now complete.
You need to reboot your server for the SNMP Agent to start correctly.
2.1.6.2 Configuring the Lotus Notes SNMP Agent
The SNMP Agent is installed as a service (LNSNMP) on your server allowing for
easy starting and stopping.
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Figure 9. LotusNotesSNMPService
There are three configuration parameters editable from Lotus Notes in the Lotus
Notes SNMP Configuration (LSNMPCFG.NSF) database.
Figure 10. LotusNotesSNMPConfigurationDatabase
Add this database to your workspace and open it to reveal a single document
containing the SNMP Control Rights.
Figure 11. LotusNotesSNMPConfigurationDatabase-Parameter View
Edit this document to control the way to start, stop and reboot the Notes server.
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Figure 12. LotusNotesSNMPConfigurationDatabase-SNMPControl Rights
Five subtrees comprise the Notes MIB: lnInfo, lnControl, lnInterceptor, lnUnix and
MPAInfo.LnInfo is the most comprehensive branch, including most of the
statistics and performance data.It is divided into 17 branches.
A summary of the structure of the Notes MIB follows:
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72 Notes
1 lnInfo
1 lnStats
1 lnAllStatsTable
2 lnStatsStartTime
3 lnStatsCurrentTime
4 lnMail
5 lnReplica
6 lnServer
7 lnComm
8 lnDisk
9 lnMem
10 lnDatabase
11 lnAgentMgr
12 lnMTAs
13 lnInternet
14 lnObject
15 lnDomino
16 lnCalSched
17 lnCollector
3 lnMIBVersion
5 lnQSBuildNumber
2 lnControl
1 lnNotesServerSetState
2 lnNotesServerState
3 lnLastTrapSeq
4 lnRecentTrapsTable
5 lnRemoteReboot
3 lnInterceptor
1 lnEvtServer
2 lnEvtType
3 lnEvtSeverity
4 lnEvtWhen
5 lnEvtData
6 lnEvtSeq
4 lnUnix
1 lnAlarm
2 lnSignal
100 MPAInfo
1 lnMainProxyAgentVersion
73 NotesPump
Figure 13. LotusNotesServer MIB
2.2 SNMP Utilities in the NT Resource Kit
The Windows NT Resource Kit contains SNMP-related tools that help extend
SNMP management:

SNMPUTIL.EXE - SNMP Browser

SNMP Monitor - SNMP Monitor

MIBCC.EXE - MIB Compiler

PERF2MIB.EXE - Performance Monitor MIB Builder Tool
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2.2.1 SNMPUTIL.EXE SNMP Browser
This command line utility allows you to send SNMP requests and to listen to
traps.SNMP requests under SNMPUTIL are get, getnext or walk.
Use the following syntax for SNMP requests:
snmputil command
agent community oidlist
Where command is:

get (to obtain the specified MIB variables)

getnext (to obtain the next MIB variable in the MIB tree)

walk (to obtain all variables in the specified MIB tree)
agent is the target workstation name or IP address; community is the SNMP
community name; oidlist is a blank separated list of MIB variables.This list may
use the numeric or textual variable name.Each variable must start with a
period (.).The following example lists the system subtree of a workstation:
snmputil walk winnt69 public .iso.org.dod.internet.mgmt.mib-2.system
The following output is generated:
Variable = system.sysDescr.0
Value = OCTET STRING - Hardware: 80486-D0 PS2/PS2 COMPATIBLE - Software: Windows NT Version 3.51
(Build Number: 1057 Uniprocessor Free )
Variable = system.sysObjectID.0
Value = OBJECT IDENTIFIER - .1.3.6.1.4.1.311.1.1.3.1
Variable = system.sysUpTime.0
Value = TimeTicks - 2971480
Variable = system.sysContact.0
Value = OCTET STRING - Contact: Leonardo P Frollini - Registered Owner: Barry D. Nusbaum
Variable = system.sysName.0
Value = OCTET STRING - WINNT69
Variable = system.sysLocation.0
Value = OCTET STRING - ITSO Raleigh
Variable = system.sysServices.0
Value = INTEGER - 76
End of MIB subtree.
Figure 14. Output fromSNMPUTILCommand
Use the following syntax to listen to SNMP traps:
snmputil trap
Note
We tried to get the snmputil trap function to work, but we were not
successful.There is a Microsoft write up on it at
http://www.microsoft.com/articles/q130/5/64.htm.
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2.2.2 SNMP Monitor
SNMPMON.EXE is a utility to monitor specific MIB variables. You use a
configuration file to specify which MIB variables to monitor and what actions to
take when specified conditions are met.SNMPMON will periodically query these
MIB variables and execute the specified actions according to the configuration
file.
The following file sets SNMPMON to monitor the number of sessions established
with one Windows NT server.This parameter is found in the MIB variable
(1.3.6.1.4.1.77.1.2.19.0):
.iso.org.dod.internet.private.enterprise.lanmanager.lanmgr-2.server.svSessionNumber
When the number of sessions exceeds ten, SNMPMON sends a message to the
admi ni strator′s machine.
//Sample file monitoring the number of sessions in Windows NT
//
// If number of sessions is greater than 10, a warning message
// is sent to the administrator machine
NTDOMC 1.3.6.1.4.1.77.1.2.19.0 20 0
>10 0 0 10000 net send winnt80 The number of sessions to NTDOMC has exceeded 10.
Three types of statements make up a configuration file:comments, scope
definitions and conditional statements.
Lines starting with // are comments.
A scope definition contains the machine name to be monitored, the MIB variable
to be monitored, the polling interval (how often SNMPMON will query this
variable, in seconds) and whether or not to log transactions (0: do not log, 1 :
log).The scope definition for the example above sets NTDOMC as the machine
to be monitored, 1.3.6.1.4.1.77.1.2.19.0 the MIB variable to be queried every 20
seconds and to not log the transactions.
A conditional statement determines when to execute an action.It contains a
condition (>10 in the above example), a log trigger (0: do not log), a command
trigger (0: execute command if condition is met), a command timeout (10000
milliseconds) and finally the command line command to be executed.
Invoke SNMPMON.EXE with the following command, using the configuration file
as a parameter, to start monitoring:
snmpmon cfg.txt
The following window will show the monitoring status:
Figure 15. MonitoringStatus
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SNMPMON may also direct its output to a database via the ODBC interface.
Refer to the Windows NT Resource Kit for details on using a database with
SNMPMON.
2.2.3 MIBCC.EXE
The MIBCC command comes with the NT Server 4.0 Resource Kit and is used to
compile MIBs.As indicated earlier in this chapter there are several MIBs that
are distributed with the NT Server 4.0 Resource Kit.
2.2.4 PERF2MIB.EXE Performance Monitor MIB Builder Tool
PERF2MIB is another tool that comes with the Resource Kit.It is typically used
by developers and it helps create new MIBs using ASN.1 syntax.It is designed
for things that use the Performance Monitor counters.
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Chapter 3.Domain Management
This chapter documents the built-in administrator capabilities of Windows NT, the
Windows NT Resource Kit and IBM add-on functions.
The administration tasks are done with various applications within Windows NT
rather than one centralized administration program.File management is done
with the File Manager (the Explorer in NT 4.0), printer management from the
Print Manager, user management from the User Manager and so on.
3.1 NT Web Administration
Figure 16. NTWebAdministration:MainScreen
The NT Web Administration is a part of the Resource Kit for Windows NT 4.0
Server.(It can also be found on Microsoft′s Web page www.microsoft.com at
ntserver/webadmi n/webadmi ndl.htm.) It allows you to administer your Windows
NT servers remotely from virtually any HTML browser.It is not in any way
intended to replace the standard administration tools that are available, but
©
Copyright IBM Corp. 1997
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merely an additional way of keeping your system up and running, even if you are
remotely attached over the network.
Some of the tasks you can perform with NT Web Administration are:

Account Management
− Create/remove user accounts
− View/change user information
− Change user passwords
− Disable user accounts
− Create/remove groups
− Add/remove users to and from groups
− Add workstations to the domain

Share Management
− View/create shares for all installed file services (Microsoft, Macintosh
and NetWare)
− Change permissions on shares

Session Management
− View/delete sessions
− Send messages to current users of the server

Server Management
− Shut down/reboot server
− Change services/driver configuration
− View system, application and security log events
− Server configuration data dump

Printer Management
− List print queues and jobs in each queue
− Pause/flush queue or specific print job
You are required to have the Internet Information Server 2.0+ (IIS) installed and
configured before you attempt to install the NT Web Administration.Since it
requires IIS 2.0, NT 3.51 users are unable to use this feature.Clients could still
be using NT 3.51, as long as you are using a compatible browser.Even though
Web Administration doesn′t get installed when you install the Resource Kit,
installation procedures are very straight forward.Just run the setup.exe file
from the /Apps/WebAdmin folder.After that, there is very little customization
requi red.Web Administration needs to be installed on all servers you wish to
manage.Installing it only on the primary domain controller (PDC) doesn′t help
you if you have shares or other manageable resources on other servers.
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Figure 17. WebAdministration:InstallationScreen
Before you start your browser after the installation, please make sure that you
enable a suitable type of password authentication on the IIS server before you
try to connect to it.By default, the Basic (Clear Text) method is turned off,
making it impossible to connect with any other browser than the Microsoft
Internet Explorer (MSIE).
Figure 18. WWWServiceProperties(Default Settings)
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We noticed some inconsistencies between the MSIE and Netscape Navigator
when selecting the right-hand side menu links.The HTML table is different in
height when you compare the two, rendering the .gif arrows out of sync.
Everything works as it should though; it′s just a visual flaw.
Figure 19. MaintenanceSelectedwithMSIEandNetscapeNavigator
Please see the following table about browser/password support for some
common versions of MSIE and Netscape Navigator.
Table 5. Browser/PasswordAuthenticationTable
Basic
WindowsNT
Challenge
Both
Internet Explorer
2.0 for Macintosh
Supported
Not supported,
can not connect
Supported - Rolls
back to Basic
Internet Explorer
2.0 for Microsoft
Windows 95
Supported
Not supported,
can not connect
Not supported,
does not roll back
to Basic, you can
not connect
Internet Explorer
2.0 for Windows
95, plus NTLM
patch
Supported
Supported
Supported -
Wi ndows NT
Chal l enge
Response appl i ed
Internet Explorer
2.0 for Windows
NT 4.0
Supported,but
browser wi l l
repeatedl y ask
you for
authenti cati on
Supported
Supported
Internet Explorer
3.0 for Windows
95/NT 4.0
Supported
Supported
Supported -
Wi ndows NT
Chal l enge
Response appl i ed
Netscape
Navi gator 2.0
Supported
Not supported
Supported - Rolls
back to Basic
Netscape
Navi gator 3.0
Supported
Not supported
Supported - Rolls
back to Basic
Netscape
Communi cator 4.0
Beta 2
Supported
Not supported
Supported - Rolls
back to Basic
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If you have the Windows NT Challenge/Response turned off or if you are using a
browser other than MSIE, you will get a window that requests you to log on as
soon as you try to select any of the menu links, except for Help.
Figure 20. WebAdministration:LogonRequester
For MSIE users, the best choice is the Windows NT Challenge/Response.This
method is the most sophisticated and doesn′t transmit the password over the
connection at all, compared to the Basic authentication which sends the
password in clear text.Either way, the user name provided is checked against
the members of the administrators group on the machine you are connecting to
and you need to be a member of this group to gain access to the server.
Some pros and cons of the NT Web Administration are:

Pros
− Access is operating system-independent (requires a compatible
browser).
− Easy installation.
− Free of charge.

Cons
− Server needs to be accessible over the Internet (if managed from the
LAN/WAN).
− IIS and Web Administration need to be installed on all servers that you
want to administer.
− The server needs to be NT 4.0 to be manageable.
The following sections discuss the similarities and drawbacks when comparing
NT Web Administration with the native management tools in Windows NT and
those included in the Resource Kit.
3.2 NT Management
Windows NT comes with a variety of management tools for different
management tasks.Most of them are GUI versions.With the NT Resource Kits
you get a set of handy command line (CMD) tools as well as quite a few GUI
tools.We only used the NT Resource Kit for NT Server 4.0, but there is also a
Resource Kit for NT Workstation 4.0 which is a subset of the server version as
well as a new resource kit called the Microsoft Windows NT Server Version 4.0
supplement 1.
Normally, one would prefer to use the GUI-based tools since they tend to be
more intuitive and easily manageable.Sometimes though, you learn to
appreciate the flexibility of a CMD program, its ability to run batch jobs and the
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possibility to run it over a text-based connection such as a TELNET session or a
remote console.
3.2.1 Adding Users
This section shows how to perform the user administration function of adding
user IDs using the GUI, the command line and the Web Management interface.
3.2.1.1 Adding a User with the Windows NT GUI
1. Start the Windows NT User Manager (for Domains).
Figure 21. WindowsNT:User Manager
2. Choose the User - New User menu items.
Figure 22. WindowsNT:NewUser
3. Fill i n the appropri ate i nformati on i n the empty fields.
4. Click on the Add button.
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3.2.1.2 Adding a User from the Windows NT Command Line
You could use the NET USER command to do this if you don′t have the Resource
Kit installed or if you only want to add a few users.See Figure 23 for the
complete syntax of the NET USER command.As you probably already know
your way with the NET commands, we try to use them as little as possible
leaving more room for alternative solutions.


NET USER [username [password | *] [options]] [/DOMAIN]
username {password | *} /ADD [options] [/DOMAIN]
username [/DELETE] [/DOMAIN]
The [options] are:
/active:{no | yes}
/comment:″Text″
/countrycode:nnn
/expires:{Date | Never}
/fullname:″Name″
/homedir:Path
/homedirreq:{Yes | No}
/passwordchg:{Yes | No}
/passwordreq:{Yes | No}
/profilepath:[Path]
/scriptpath:Path
/times:{Times | All}
/usercomment:″Text″
/workstations:{Computername[,...] | *}


Figure 23. Syntaxof theNETUSERCommand
The ADDUSERS.EXE command that comes with the Resource Kit is a very useful
command when you want to add many users and groups to an NT server at the
same time.Since it reads its input from a text file, you could easily
machine-generate this file by exporting an employee record or a list of users to
an ASCII-file with the format described in Figure 25 on page 30.For the
complete syntax of the ADDUSERS.EXE command, see Figure 24.


Adds, Writes, or Erases accounts as specified by a delimited file.
ADDUSERS [/?] [\\computername [[/c | /d | /e] filename]] [/s:?]
/?Display this help screen.
/c Create accounts specified in the file.
/d Write current accounts to the specified file.
/e Erase user accounts specified in the file.
/s:? Sets the separator character for the input/output file. Replace the
? with the character to be used for separating fields. (eg /s:Ä)
Note: The separator character is a comma ′,′ by default.
For detailed information please refer to the Resource Kit Help file.


Figure 24. Syntaxof theADDUSERS.EXECommand
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[Users]
<Username>,<Full Name>,<Password>,<Description>,<Home Drive>,<Home
Path>,<Profile>,<Logon Script>
[Global]
<Global Group Name>,<Comment>,<Username1>,<Username2>, ...
[Local]
<Local Group Name>,<Comment>,<Username1>,<Username2>, ...


Figure 25. Format of ASCII-filefor UsewithADDUSERS.EXE
Note
The syntax mentioned in the Windows NT Resource Kit help file differs from
the actual ADDUSERS.EXE syntax regarding the <Description> parameter.
Windows NT Resource Kit help file format:
[Users]
<User Name>,<Full Name>,<Password>,<Home Drive>,<Home Path>,<Profile>,
<Script>
ADDUSERS.EXE format:
[Users]
<User Name>,<Full Name>,<Password>,<Description>,<Home Drive>,
<Home Path>,<Profile>,<Script>
The <Descri pti on> parameter i s l eft out i n the hel p fi l e.Trying to add users
from a file based on this syntax will not generate any error messages (except
if the fields you specify contain illegal information) but will generate user
accounts wi th i nval i d val ues i n the fi el ds after <Password>.
1. Create a text file (users.txt) containing the user(s) you want to add.
2. Issue the
ADDUSERS \\<Servername> /c users.txt
command.
Figure 26. WindowsNTCMD:AddingaUser withtheADDUSERS.EXECommand
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3.2.1.3 Adding a User with the Web Management Interface
1. Connect to the server wi th your browser
(ht t p://<Servername>/NTAdmi n/NTAdmi n.ht m).
2. Click on the Accounts link.
3. Click on the Users link.
This will bring you to the following window:
Figure 27. WebAdministration:User Accounts
4. Click on the Create New button.
Figure 28. WebAdministration:CreateNewUser Account
5. Fill i n the appropri ate i nformati on i n the empty fields.
6. Click on the Create button.
3.2.2 Editing Users
This section shows how to perform the user administration function of editing
user IDs using the GUI, the command line and the Web Management interface.
3.2.2.1 Editing User IDs with the Windows NT GUI
1. Start the Windows NT User Manager (for Domains).
2. Select the user you wi sh to edit.
3. Either double-click,press Enter or choose the User - Properties menu items.
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Figure 29. WindowsNT:User Properties
4. Edit the desi red fields.
5. Click on the OK button.
3.2.2.2 Editing User IDs from the Windows NT Command Line
Editing users from the Windows NT command line using the NET USER command
is very tedious work, especially if you want to change more than one parameter
at a time.See Figure 23 on page 29 for the complete syntax of the NET USER
command.The Windows NT ADDUSERS.EXE command doesn′t let you change
users properties.
3.2.2.3 Editing User IDs with the Web Management Interface
1. Connect to the server wi th your browser
(ht t p://<Servername>/NTAdmi n/NTAdmi n.ht m).
2. Click on the Accounts link.
3. Click on the Users link.
4. Select the user you wi sh to edit.
5. Click on the Properties button.
This will bring you to the following window:
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Figure 30. WebAdministration:User Properties
6. Edit the desi red fields.
7. Click on the Update button.
3.2.3 Removing User Accounts
This section shows how to perform the user administration function of removing
user IDs using the GUI, the command line and the Web Management interface.
Note
If you remove a user account and create a new one with the same name, it
wi l l
not restore access to resources that currently reference this user
account in the access control list.
3.2.3.1 Removing a User with the Windows NT GUI
1. Start the Windows NT User Manager (for Domains).
2. Select the user you wi sh to delete.
3. Click on the Delete button or choose the User - Delete menu items.
Figure 31. WindowsNT:DeleteUser Requester
4. Select OK.
3.2.3.2 Removing a User ID from the Windows NT Command Line
You could use the NET USER command to do this if you don′t have the Resource
Kit installed or if you only want to remove a few users.See Figure 23 on
page 29 for the complete syntax of the NET USER command.The fastest way to
remove many users from a server using the Windows NT command line is to
export the user data to a file, edit the file and then use the ADDUSERS.EXE
command to remove them.
1. Dump the user data to a text file (users.txt) by issuing the
ADDUSERS
\\<servername> /d users.txt
command.
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2. Edit the file i n a text edi tor of your choice,removi ng al l the group sections
and the users you want to keep.
When you′re done, the file should only contain the users you want to
remove.
3. Issue the
ADDUSERS \\<Servername> /e users.txt
command.
Figure 32. WindowsNTCMD:RemovingUsersUsingtheADDUSERS.EXECommand
3.2.3.3 Removing a User ID with the Web Management Interface
1. Connect to the server wi th your browser
(ht t p://<Servername>/NTAdmi n/NTAdmi n.ht m).
2. Click on the Accounts link.
3. Click on the Users link.
4. Select the user you wi sh to delete.
5. Click on the Delete button.
You will get the following window:
Figure 33. WebAdministration:DeleteUser Account
6. Click on the Delete button.
3.2.4 Adding Local Groups
The concept of groups in Windows NT greatly simplifies the assignment of
permissions and rights in your NT environment.There are two types of groups
available in Windows NT, local and global, and they differ considerably from
each other.
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On a Windows NT Server, a local group can only be granted permissions and
rights for the domain controllers of its own domain but it can contain user
accounts and global groups both from its own domain and from trusted domains.
A global group on the other hand can be used in its own domain (on member
servers and workstations) and on trusted domains.It can become a member of
a local group but only contain user accounts from its own domain.
3.2.4.1 Adding a Local Group with the Windows NT GUI
1. Start the Windows NT User Manager (for Domains).
2. Choose the User - New Local Group menu items.
Figure 34. WindowsNT:NewLocal Group
3. Fill i n the appropri ate i nformati on i n the empty fields.
4. Click on the OK button.
3.2.4.2 Adding a Local Group from the Windows NT Command Line
The NET GROUP command doesn′t support adding local groups to a server.It
can only operate on global groups when in a domain.See Figure 35 for the
complete syntax of the NET GROUP command.


NET GROUP [groupname [/COMMENT:″text″]] [/DOMAIN]
groupname {/ADD [/COMMENT:″text″] | /DELETE} [/DOMAIN]
groupname username [...] {/ADD | /DELETE} [/DOMAIN]


Figure 35. Syntaxof theNETGROUPCommand
Instead, we used the ADDUSERS.EXE command from the Windows NT Resource
Kit.
1. Create a text file (users.txt) containing the local group(s) you want to add.
See Figure 25 on page 30 for the correct format.
2. Issue the
ADDUSERS \\<servername> /c users.txt
command.
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Figure 36. WindowsNTCMD:CreatingaGroupUsingtheADDUSERS.EXECommand
3.2.4.3 Adding a Local Group with the Web Management Interface
1. Connect to the server wi th your browser
(ht t p://<Servername>/NTAdmi n/NTAdmi n.ht m).
2. Click on the Accounts link.
3. Click on the Groups link.
4. Click on the Create button.
You will get the following window:
Figure 37. WebAdministration:NewGroupInformation
5. Fill i n the appropri ate i nformati on i n the empty fields.
6. Click on the Create button.
3.2.5 Editing Groups

Web Management doesn′t let you populate a group with members. Instead
you have to assign groups to users.

Web Management doesn′t let you change the description of a group.
3.2.5.1 Editing Groups with the Windows NT GUI
1. Start the Windows NT User Manager (for Domains).
2. Select the group you wi sh to edit.
3. Either double-click,press Enter or choose the User - Properties menu items.
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Figure 38. WindowsNT:Local GroupProperties
4. Add/Remove users and/or change the description.
5. Click on the OK button.
3.2.5.2 Editing Groups from the Windows NT Command Line
The Windows NT Resource Kit ADDUSERS.EXE command doesn′t let you edit
groups.Instead you have to use the NET GROUP command.See Figure 35 on
page 35 for the complete syntax of the NET GROUP command.
Figure 39. Exampleof AddingaUser toaGroupUsingtheNETGROUPCommand
3.2.5.3 Editing Groups with the Web Management Interface
1. Connect to the server wi th your browser
(ht t p://<Servername>/NTAdmi n/NTAdmi n.ht m).
2. Click on the Accounts link.
3. Click on the Users link.
4. Select the user you wi sh to edi t group membershi ps for.
5. Click on the Groups button and you wi l l get the fol l owi ng wi ndow:
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Figure 40. WebAdministration:GroupMemberships
3.2.6 Removing Groups
When removing groups, be sure you are aware of all the resources that use the
group for permission control. If you′re not the only one using the group,
removing it could be fatal for access elsewhere in your system.Write
descriptive comments for the groups to help avoid unnecessary work recreating
the structure. If you delete a group and create a new one with the same name, it
will not restore the access to your resources.
3.2.6.1 Removing Groups with the Windows NT GUI
1. Start the Windows NT User Manager (for Domains).
2. Select the group you wi sh to delete.
3. Click on the Delete button or choose the User - Delete menu items.
Figure 41. WindowsNT:DeleteRequester
4. Select OK.
3.2.6.2 Removing Groups from the Windows NT Command Line
The fastest way to remove many groups from a server using the Windows NT
command line is to export the group data to a file, edit the file and then use the
ADDUSERS.EXE command to remove them.
1. Dump the group data to a text file (users.txt) by issuing the
ADDUSERS
\\<servername> /d users.txt
command.
2. Edit the file i n a text edi tor of your choice,removi ng the user section and al l
the group sections that you want to keep.
When you′re done, the file should only contain the groups you want to
remove.
3. Issue the
ADDUSERS \\<servername> /e users.txt
command.
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Figure 42. WindowsNTCMD:RemovingGroupsUsingtheADDUSERS.EXECommand
3.2.6.3 Removing Groups with the Web Management Interface
1. Connect to the server wi th your browser
(ht t p://<Servername>/NTAdmi n/NTAdmi n.ht m).
2. Click on the Accounts link.
3. Click on the Groups link.
Figure 43. WebAdministration:GroupAccounts
4. Select the group you wi sh to delete.
5. Click on the Delete button.
Figure 44. WebAdministration:DeleteGroup
6. Click on the Delete button.
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3.2.7 Adding Global Groups
For an explanation of global and local groups, see 3.2.4, “Adding Local Groups”
on page 34.
3.2.7.1 Adding Global Groups with the Windows NT GUI
1. Start the Windows NT User Manager (for Domains).
2. Choose the User - New Global Group menu items.
Figure 45. WindowsNT:NewGlobal Group
3. Fill i n the appropri ate i nformati on i n the empty fields.
4. Click on the OK button.
3.2.7.2 Adding Global Groups from the Windows NT Command
Line
You could use the NET GROUP command to do this if you don′t have the
Resource Kit installed or if you only want to add a few global groups.See
Figure 35 on page 35 for the complete syntax of the NET GROUP command.
1. Create a text file (users.txt) containing the group(s) you want to add.
2. Issue the
ADDUSERS \\<servername> /c users.txt
command.
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Figure 46. WindowsNTCMD:ADDUSERS
3.2.7.3 Adding Global Groups with the Web Management Interface
You can not add global groups using the Web Management interface.
3.2.8 Creating Shared Directories
The easiest way to access a resource from another computer is to share the
resource.This way, the resource owner has full control over who can use the
resource and for what.
The folder to be shared needs to be physically present in the machine on which
the share is done.This means that you can′t share a folder that you have
connected to from another machine.However, with the Resource Kit there are
two useful tools to handle remote sharing of folders.The first is a command line
tool called rmtshare.exe and the other is a DLL that lets you share a folder that
doesn′t reside on the machine you are running on.
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RMTSHARE\\server
\\server\sharename
\\server\sharename=drive:path [/USERS:number | /UNLIMITED]
[/REMARK:″text″]
[/GRANT [user[:perm][ /GRANT user[:perm]]]]
[/REMOVE user]
\\server\sharename=printername /PRINTER [/USERS:number | /UNLIMITED]
[/REMARK:″text″]
[/GRANT [user[:perm][ /GRANT user[:perm]]]]
[/REMOVE user]
\\server\sharename [/USERS:number | /UNLIMITED]
[/REMARK:″text″]
[/GRANT [user[:perm][ /GRANT user[:perm]]]]
[/REMOVE user]
\\server\sharename /DELETE
NOTE: if a sharename or path contains spaces, it should be enclosed
in quotes:
\\server\″with space″=″c:\with space″


Figure 47. Syntaxof theRMTSHARE.EXECommand
Figure 48. WindowsNTCMD:CreatingaRemoteSharewithRMTSHARE.EXE
To install the .DLL, right-click on the ShareUI.inf file in your /RESKIT folder and
choose Install.To see what it can do, connect to a host of your choice in the
Explorer.
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Figure 49. ShareUI:SharedDirectories1
As you can see, there′s a new drawer on each host called Shared Directories
that contains all available shares on each particular host.
Select New - Share from the File menu as shown in Figure 50.
Figure 50. ShareUI:MenuFile-New-Share
Fill in the fields with the appropriate information.Unfortunately you need to
know the exact path to where you want the share to be, so a Browse button
might be a useful addition in future versions.
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Figure 51. ShareUI:NewShare
The share is created on the remote host (provided you have permission to do
so) and you can now access the information using this share or map it to a drive
on your machine.
Figure 52. ShareUI:SharedDirectories2
3.2.8.1 Creating Shared Directories with the Windows NT GUI
1. Using the Windows Explorer,select the folder you wi sh to share and click the
right mouse button.
2. Select Sharing.
3. Change the radi o button from Not Shared to Shared As.
4. Change or accept the default share name and opti onal l y enter a comment.
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Figure 53. WindowsNT:ShareProperties
5. Select OK.
3.2.8.2 Creating Shared Folders from the Windows NT Command
Line
1. Make sure you know the path to the folder you wi sh to share.
2. Issue the
NET SHARE sharename=drive:path /REMARK:″Optional Remark″
command.See Figure 55 on page 46 for the complete syntax of the NET
SHARE command.
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Figure 54. WindowsNTCMD:NETSHARECommand


NET SHARE sharename
sharename=drive:path [/USERS:number | /UNLIMITED]
[/REMARK:″text″]
sharename [/USERS:number | /UNLIMITED]
[/REMARK:″text″]
{sharename | devicename | drive:path} /DELETE


Figure 55. Syntaxof theNETSHARECommand
3.2.8.3 Creating Shared Folders with the Web Management
Interface
1. Connect to the server wi th your browser
(ht t p://<Servername>/NTAdmi n/NTAdmi n.ht m).
2. Click on the File System link.
3. Click on the Shared Directories link.
Figure 56. WebAdministration:Shares
4. Click on the Create New button.
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Figure 57. WebAdministration:NewShareInformation
5. Fill i n the appropri ate i nformati on i n the empty fields.
6. Click on the Add button.
3.2.9 Editing Share Permissions
This section shows how to perform the user administration function of editing
share permissions using the GUI and the command line.
3.2.9.1 Edit Share Permissions with the Windows NT GUI
1. Using the Explorer,select the share you wi sh to edit and click the right
mouse button.
2. Select Sharing.
3. Click on the Permissions button.
Figure 58. WindowsNT:AccessthroughSharePermissions
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4. If the user/group al ready exists,use Type of Access to edit it.If not,select
Remove or Add.
Figure 59. WindowsNT:AddUsersandGroups
5. Select the users/groups you want to add and set the access permi ssi ons i n
the Type of Access field.
6. Click on the OK button.
3.2.9.2 Edit Share Permissions from the Windows NT Command
Line
1. If you want to check the permi ssi ons before you edi t them,i ssue the
RMTSHARE
\\<servername>\<sharename>
command.
2. Use the/GRANT swi tch to specify the rights.See Figure 47 on page 42 for
the complete syntax of the RMTSHARE command.
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Figure 60. WindowsNTCMD:EditingShareswiththeRMTSHARECommand
3.2.9.3 Edit Share Permissions with the Web Management
Interface
You can′t edit shares using Web Administration.Work around this by deleting
the person/group you wish to edit from the Access Control List and then adding
them again.
3.2.10 Removing Shares
This section shows how to perform the user administration function of removing
shares using the GUI, the command line and the Web Management interface.
3.2.10.1 Removing a Share with the Windows NT GUI
1. Using the Explorer,select the shared folder you wi sh to remove the share
attribute from and click the right mouse button.
2. Select Sharing.
3. Change the radi o button from Shared As to Not Shared.
4. Select OK.
3.2.10.2 Removing a Share from the Windows NT Command Line
1. Find out the share name by issuing the
NET SHARE
command.
2. Issue the
NET SHARE sharename /DELETE
command.See Figure 55 on page 46
for the complete syntax of the NET SHARE command.
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Figure 61. WindowsNTCMD:NETSHARE/DELETECommand
3.2.10.3 Removing a Share with the Web Management Interface
1. Connect to the server wi th your browser
(ht t p://<Servername>/NTAdmi n/NTAdmi n.ht m).
2. Click on the File System link.
3. Click on the Shared Directories l i nk (see Figure 56 on page 46).
4. Click on the Delete button.
3.2.11 File System Management (File/Folder Permissions)
This section shows how to perform the user administration function of managing
file systems using the GUI, the command line and the Web Management
interface.
3.2.11.1 Managing Permissions with the Windows NT GUI
1. Using the Explorer,select the fi l e/fol der you wi sh to al ter permi ssi ons for
and click the right mouse button.
2. Select Properties.
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Figure 62. WindowsNT:Properties
3. Select the Security tab.
Figure 63. WindowsNT:Permissions
4. If the user/group al ready exists,use Type of Access to edit it.If not,select
Remove or Add.
5. Select the users/groups you want to add and set the access wi th Type of
Access.
6. Click on the OK button.
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3.2.11.2 Managing Permissions from the Windows NT Command
Line
Permission management from the Windows NT command line is done with the
cacls.exe command.See Figure 64 for the complete syntax of the cacls.exe
command.


Displays or modifies access control lists (ACLs) of files
CACLS filename [/T] [/E] [/C] [/G user:perm] [/R user [...]]
[/P user:perm [...]] [/D user [...]]
filename Displays ACLs.
/T Changes ACLs of specified files in
the current directory and all subdirectories.
/E Edit ACL instead of replacing it.
/C Continue on access denied errors.
/G user:perm Grant specified user access rights.
Perm can be: R Read
C Change (write)
F Full control
/R user Revoke specified user′s access rights (only valid with /E).
/P user:perm Replace specified user′s access rights.
Perm can be: N None
R Read
C Change (write)
F Full control
/D user Deny specified user access.
Wildcards can be used to specify more that one file in a command.
You can specify more than one user in a command.


Figure 64. Syntaxof theCACLS.EXECommand
3.2.11.3 Managing Permissions with the Web Management
Interface
1. Connect to the server wi th your browser
(ht t p://<Servername>/NTAdmi n/NTAdmi n.ht m).
2. Click on the File System link.
3. Click on the File and Folder Access for NTFS partitions link.
Figure 65. WebAdministration:Select File/Folder
4. Select the folder and file you wi sh to edit.
5. Click on the Permissions button.
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Figure 66. WebAdministration:Permissionsfor File/Folder
6. Edit the permi ssi ons as you like.
3.2.12 Broadcasting Messages
Broadcasting a message will pop up a box on the connected users screens
(provided they have the Messenger service started).Any user logged on can
send a message to or from any workstation or server on the network that they
can connect to.
Figure 67. Broadcast Message
3.2.12.1 Broadcasting a Message with the Windows NT GUI
1. Start the Wi ndows NT Server Manager.
Figure 68. WindowsNT:Server Manager
2. Select the desi red computer to broadcast message to.
3. Choose the Computer - Send Message menu items.
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Figure 69. WindowsNT:SendMessage
4. Type the message you wi sh to broadcast.
5. Click on the OK button.
3.2.12.2 Broadcasting a Message from the Windows NT Command
Line
Broadcasting a message from the Windows NT command line is done with the
NET SEND command.See Figure 70 for the complete syntax of the NET SEND
command.


NET SEND {name | * | /DOMAIN[:name] | /USERS} message


Figure 70. Syntaxof theNETSENDCommand
Figure 71. WindowsNTCMD:NETSENDCommand
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3.2.12.3 Broadcasting a Message with the Web Management
Interface
1. Connect to the server wi th your browser
(ht t p://<Servername>/NTAdmi n/NTAdmi n.ht m).
2. Click on the Maintenance link.
3. Click on the Broadcast Message link.
Figure 72. WebAdministration:Server Manager
4. Type the message you wi sh to broadcast.
5. Click on the Send Message button.
3.2.13 Remote Console
The Remote Console Server is a part of the Windows NT Resource Kit and needs
to be installed on the machines you wish to be able to connect to in order to use
the remote client (rclient).The Remote Console Client is provided both with the
Windows NT Resource Kit and with the Windows NT Web Administration.We
have found this connection method to be a better alternative for remote sessions
than the telnetd service.Both services are still in beta and you may experience
some probl ems.At times we lost the connection between the systems without
any apparent reason.Since the rclient requires you to connect from an NT
workstation, the telnetd service is still a good way to connect from other
operating systems.
3.2.13.1 Using Remote Console with the Windows NT GUI
You can not use the remote console with the Windows NT GUI.
3.2.13.2 Using Remote Console from the Windows NT Command
Line
1. Make sure the Remote Consol e Server i s runni ng on the machi ne you′re
connecting to.
2. Issue the
RCLIENT \\COMPUTERNAME
command.See Figure 74 on page 56 for
the complete syntax of the rclient.exe command.
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Figure 73. WindowsNTCMD:RemoteClient Command


rclient 0.96 (developed by Christophe ROBERT (chrisrob@microsoft.com))
rclient [\\]computername


Figure 74. Syntaxfor theRCLIENT.EXECommand
3. When you are finished worki ng on the remote machine,type
exit
.
3.2.13.3 Using the Remote Console with the Web Management
Interface
The Remote Console isn′t really a Web Administration function.The browser
merely provides you with the executable if you should end up on a workstation
that doesn′t have it installed; be aware that it needs to be a Windows NT
workstation though.
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Figure 75. WebAdministration:RemoteConsole
3.2.14 Rebooting Servers
This section shows how to perform the user administrator function of rebooting
servers.The server can be local or remote.
3.2.14.1 Rebooting Server with the Windows NT GUI
1. Start the Wi ndows NT Shutdown Manager.
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Figure 76. WindowsNT:ShutdownManager
2. Select the desi red computer to shut down.
3. Edit the message text or accept the default.
4. Click on the OK button.
3.2.14.2 Rebooting Server from the Windows NT Command Line
Shutting down or rebooting a machine from the Windows NT command line
requires the SHUTDOWN.EXE command from the Windows NT Resource Kit.


Release 2.0 written by A. Blatzheim 1993 at Microsoft GmbH
Usage: SHUTDOWN [/?] [\\Computer] [/L] [/A] [/R] [/T:xx] [″Msg″] [/Y] [/C]
/?Shows this screen.
\\Computer Specifies a remote computer to shutdown.
/L Specifies a local shutdown.
/A Aborts a system shutdown. This is only possible during the
timeout period.If this switch is used, all other are ignored.
/R Specifies that the machine should reboot after shutdown.
/T:xx Sets the timer for system shutdown in seconds.[20 sec. default]
″Msg″ Specifies an additional message
/Y Answer all following questions with yes
/C Forces running applications to close.
ATTENTION: If you use the /C parameter NT ignores the
applications option to save data which may
have changed. You will see no File-Save dialog
box, because NT will force the application to
close. This will result in a loss of all data.
not previously saved !!!


Figure 77. Syntaxfor theSHUTDOWN.EXECommand
Issue the
shutdown/L/T:200/Y/R ″This machine is being rebooted for
maintenance!″
command.
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Figure 78. WindowsNTCMD:SystemShutdown/Reboot Command
3.2.14.3 Rebooting Server with the Web Management Interface
1. Connect to the server wi th your browser
(ht t p://<Servername>/NTAdmi n/NTAdmi n.ht m).
2. Click on the Maintenance link.
3. Click on the Reboot Server link.
Figure 79. WebAdministration:Reboot Server
4. Edit the message text or accept the default.
5. Click on the Reboot button.
3.2.15 Printer Management
This section shows how to perform the user administrator function of managing
printers.We show how to do that from the GUI, the command line and from the
Web Management interface.
3.2.15.1 Managing Printers with the Windows NT GUI
1. Start the Pri nter Manager.
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Figure 80. WindowsNT:Printers
2. Double-click on the pri nter you want to manage.
Figure 81. WindowsNT:Printer Status
3. Double-click on the j ob you want to manage.
Figure 82. WindowsNT:Printer JobManager
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3.2.15.2 Managing Printers from the Windows NT Command Line


NET PRINT \\computername\sharename
[\\computername] job# [/HOLD | /RELEASE | /DELETE]


Figure 83. Syntaxof theNETPRINTCommand
Figure 84. WindowsNTCMD:ManagingPrinter JobsUsingtheNETPRINTCommand
3.2.15.3 Managing Printers with the Web Management Interface
1. Connect to the server wi th your browser
(ht t p://<Servername>/NTAdmi n/NTAdmi n.ht m).
2. Click on the Printers link.
Figure 85. WebAdministration:Printers
3. Select the pri nter you want to manage.
4. Click on the Jobs button.
5. Select the j ob you want to manage.
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Figure 86. WebAdministration:Print Jobs
6. Pause,Resume or Delete the job.
3.2.16 Device Management
In Windows NT 4.0 a new feature was added that helped with the management of
hardware profiles.It lets you start different components depending on your
current configuration. If you are using a laptop for instance, you might not want
to start your SCSI drivers when you aren′t docked since your SCSI interface is
located in your docking station.
3.2.16.1 Managing Devices with the Windows NT GUI
Devices are managed with the Device Manager (Devices) located in the Control
Panel.
Figure 87. WindowsNT:DeviceManager
Here you can start and stop devices installed on your system, change hardware
profile settings and change the startup type.
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Figure 88. WindowsNT:DeviceManager -HardwareProfiles
Figure 89. WindowsNT:DeviceManager -StartupType
3.2.16.2 Managing Devices from the Windows NT Command Line
You can not manage devices using the command line interface.
3.2.16.3 Managing Devices with the Web Management Interface
Management of the hardware profiles through the Web Management interface is
done as follows:
1. Connect to the server wi th your browser
(ht t p://<Servername>/NTAdmi n/NTAdmi n.ht m).
2. Click on the Devices link.
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Figure 90. WebAdministration:DeviceManager
Here you can start and stop devices installed on your system and change the
startup type.
Figure 91. WebAdministration:DeviceManager -StartupType
One odd thing we discovered while testing the Device Manager with Web
Administration was that the list of devices isn′t consistently sorted.
Figure 92. WebAdministration:DeviceManager -Inconsistent Sorting
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We have no explanation for this phenomenon but the error is consistent across
all servers that we worked on.
3.2.17 Services Management
This section shows how to manage the startup of NT Services using the GUI,
command line, and Web Management interface.
3.2.17.1 Managing Services with the Windows NT GUI
1. Start the Service Manager (Services) from the Control Panel.
Figure 93. WindowsNT:Services
Here you can start, stop, pause and change the startup type and hardware
profile settings (see 3.2.16, “Device Management” on page 62) for services
installed on your system.
2. Click on the Startup button.
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Figure 94. WindowsNT:ServiceStartup
3.2.17.2 Managing Services from the Windows NT Command Line
Managing services from the Windows NT command line is an inefficient task
using the NET
[
START | STOP | PAUSE | CONTINUE
]
command.Installed but
stopped services are not visible at all and paused services show up in the
started list.
To list started services, issue the
NET START
without any switches.
3.2.17.3 Managing Services with the Web Management Interface
1. Connect to the server wi th your browser
(ht t p://<Servername>/NTAdmi n/NTAdmi n.ht m).
2. Click on the Services link.
Figure 95. WebAdministration:ServiceManager
Here you can start, stop, pause and change the startup type for services
installed on your system.
3. Click on the Startup button and edit the settings.
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4. Click on the Update button.
The same problem with inconsistent sorting as in the Device Management with
the Web Management Interface (please see 3.2.16.3, “Managing Devices with the
Web Management Interface” on page 63) occurs in the Services list.
3.2.18 Sessions Management
This section shows how to manage sessions using the GUI, command line, and
Web Management interface.
3.2.18.1 Managing Sessions with the Windows NT GUI
1. Start the Wi ndows NT Server Manager (Figure 68 on page 53).
2. Select the desi red computer to manage sessions on.
3. Double-click on the sel ected server and click on the Users button.
Figure 96. WindowsNT:User Sessions
4. Disconnect the connection(s).
5. Click on the Close button.
3.2.18.2 Managing Sessions from the Windows NT Command Line
Use the NET SESSION command to list all sessions on your machine.See
Figure 98 on page 68 for complete syntax of the NET SESSION command.
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Figure 97. WindowsNTCMD:ManagingSessionsUsingtheNETSESSIONCommand


The syntax of this command is:
NET SESSION [\\computername] [/DELETE]


Figure 98. Syntaxof theNETSESSIONCommand
3.2.18.3 Managing Sessions with the Web Management Interface
1. Connect to the server wi th your browser
(ht t p://<Servername>/NTAdmi n/NTAdmi n.ht m).
2. Click on the Sessions link.
Figure 99. WebAdministration:Sessions
3. Select the session you woul d l i ke to get i nformati on on.
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Figure 100. WebAdministration:Sessions-Information
3.2.19 Performance Management
This section provides a brief overview of how to use the Web Management
interface to get performance data.
3.2.19.1 Managing Performance with the Windows NT GUI
See Chapter 5, “Performance Management” on page 165 for a complete review
of Performance Management.
3.2.19.2 Managing Performance from the Windows NT Command
Line
It′s not possible to do any performance management from the command prompt.
3.2.19.3 Managing Performance with the Web Management
Interface
1. Connect to the server wi th your browser
(ht t p://<Servername>/NTAdmi n/NTAdmi n.ht m).
2. Click on the Status link.
3. Click on the Performance Statistics link.
Figure 101. WebAdministration:PerformanceMonitor Objects
4. Select the object of interest and click on the Counters button.
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Figure 102. WebAdministration:Counters
3.2.20 Server Configuration
Configuring the server is done using different tools for different parts of the
server.This section shows how to display the various settings using the three
different approaches: GUI, command line and Web.
3.2.20.1 Managing Server Configuration with the Windows NT GUI
1. Start the Windows NT Diagnostics Program from the Admi ni strati ve Tools
Group.
You can also start it from the command line.The executable is located at
\\winnt\winmsd.exe
.
Figure 103. WindowsNT:WindowsNTDiagnostics
2. Navigate your way through the appl i cati on usi ng the avai l abl e tabs.
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3.2.20.2 Managing Server Configuration from the Windows NT
Command Line
There isn′t much hardware information available from the command line.Using
the NET CONFIG
[
SERVER | WORKSTATION
]
will give you some information
about OS level and NICs.
If you use the command line interface for winsmd /? you will find there are a few
things that you can do.You can get the following reports:

A complete system report

A summary system report
For a sample of the summary report, see Appendix B, “Windows NT Diagnostic
Summary” on page 275.
3.2.20.3 Managing Server Configuration with the Web Management
Interface
1. Connect to the server wi th your browser
(ht t p://<Servername>/NTAdmi n/NTAdmi n.ht m).
2. Click on the Status link.
3. Click on the Server Configuration link.
Figure 104. WebAdministration:ConfigurationCategory
4. Select a category of interest and click on the Get Configuration button.
Figure 105. WebAdministration:Server Configuration
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When displaying the operating system version, we discovered an inability for the
Web Administration Interface to correctly display the Service Pack level of the
queried machine.When using the GUI application the correct information was
displayed.This error was consistent on all machines we tested the Web
administration on.
3.2.21 Web Administration Preferences
Under the Web administration menu maintenance is a selection called Web
Administration Preferences.
Figure 106. WebAdministration:Preferences
This applies to the General Windows NT Server status information reachable
from the Welcome screen of Web administration (see Figure 16 on page 23).
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Figure 107. WebAdministration:Server Status
Depending on the workload of your server, you should change these to fit your
server.
3.3 User Synchronization between Lotus Notes and Windows NT
Lotus Notes Domino provides a way to tightly integrate user administration and
authentication between Lotus Notes and Windows NT.With just a few
exceptions, the administrator can now synchronize Person documents in the
Notes Name & Address Book (NAB) and user accounts on the Windows NT
server.This synchronization works both ways, allowing the administrator to
either have Lotus Notes generating or deleting Windows NT users or vice versa.
After installing User synchronization, a new menu item, Notes, is added to the
Windows NT User Manager for Domains.This menu contains several options
that effect how synchronization is performed.
Figure 108. WindowsNTUser Manager for Domains:NotesMenuAdded
All of the settings are on a per session basis and don′t get saved for future use.
If the User Manager is closed and re-opened, the settings are lost.
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User synchronization lets you keep both the NAB and User Manager current,
without having to update both when either changes.Also, you can manage user
information in the NAB and User Manager through the interface of your choice,
either Lotus Notes or Windows NT.Not all fields are synchronized though.For
example, changes to the users full names on one system do not cause an
update on the other.
You are required to have a Notes user ID with appropriate access to make any
changes to a Lotus Notes server′s public address book, even when using
Windows NT to do this.To add users you also need access to the certifier with
which you wish to certify the users.On the NT side, you must be a member of
the administrator group or account operator group to add user accounts to User
Manager.
3.3.1 Installation of the User Synchronization
The easiest way to install the Lotus Notes User synchronization is to do it while
installing the Lotus Notes server. By default, this option is
not checked when you
choose the customized install and you have to make sure you select it manually.
If you already have installed the Lotus Notes server but didn′t install the Lotus
Notes User synchronization, run the installation program again and select only
the Lotus Notes User synchronization using the customized installation.
Figure 109. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:Installation
You will get a warning message as you try to check the User synchronization
box, informing you of the requirement to have administrator rights to install the
product. Make sure you are an administrator or equivalent before you proceed.
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Figure 110. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:WarningMessage
When the installation is done, start the User Manager to see the new options.
3.3.2 User Synchronization Settings
The first thing you need to do is to enable the User synchronization from the
Notes menu in the User Manager.
Figure 111. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:NotesMenu
3.3.2.1 Registration Setup
When choosing this menu item, the User Manager looks in your notes.ini file for
a valid Notes user ID.If Lotus Notes Single Logon isn′t enabled or if you haven′t
already authenticated it in this session, a Notes Password requester will pop up
asking you for the appropriate password.
Figure 112. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:Enter NotesPassword
After authentication you will get prompted for the certifier ID to use.
Figure 113. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:ChooseNotesCertifier ID
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The following screen resembles the Register Person screen (Figure 132 on
page 82) that you have to fill in when registering users in Notes.Fill in the
appropriate information regarding server and license information.If you plan on
using the Lotus Notes Single Logon service, make sure Use common Notes/NT
password is checked.At registration time you have the option to change this for
individual users providing you don′t use the quick registration.
Figure 114. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:NotesRegistrationSetup
Note.
Selecting the Use common Notes/NT password option will cause the existing
NT password for the NT user to be replaced with the common NT/Notes
password.Make sure you inform the user about this if the account is active
when synchronizing with Notes.
3.3.2.2 Mail/ID Registration Options
Selecting the mail server to be used when registering the users is done in the
same manner as registering the users from Lotus Notes (see Figure 134 on
page 83).
Figure 115. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:NotesMail/IDRegistrationOptions
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3.3.2.3 Deletion/Rename Options
When deleting a user, Lotus Notes uses the Administration Process (Service
Task ADMINP) on the server to remove the necessary files and references.If
you choose to delete a user′s mail file when deleting a user, an Approve File
Deletion request is generated in the Administration Requests database.See
3.3.5.2, “Deleting Users from Lotus Notes” on page 89 for how this is done.
Figure 116. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:NotesUser DeletionandRenameOptions
3.3.3 Adding Users
The administrator has the ability to add users to the system either from Lotus
Notes or from Windows NT.Even though the accounts get synchronized there′s
still information that has to be edited manually after the registration is done.
Both approaches will be demonstrated in this chapter but there′s always
additional refinements that can be done, such as using user templates or flat file
registering of users.
3.3.3.1 Adding One User to Lotus Notes from Windows NT
1. Start the User Manager for Domains.
2. Select the user you wi sh to add as a Lotus Notes user.
3. From the Notes menu,select Add selected NT users to Notes.
Figure 117. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:User RegistryConfirmation
4. Select OK.
5. Assuming you want to use a common NT/Notes password,enter a password
that will be used for the user to verify both Windows NT logins and Lotus
Notes ID file access.
Make sure that the password meets the security requirements of both
systems in terms of its naming convention.
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6. Click on the OK button.
Figure 118. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:Enter NotesUser Information
7. Click on OK.
Figure 119. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:BeginRegistration
8. To start the registration process,select the Begin Registration button.
The system will create an ID file for the user, certify it with the certification ID
specified and create the user′s mail file.
Figure 120. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:
9. Click on the OK button.
To look at the user, open the Notes Address Book on the server and select the
People view.
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Figure 121. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:PersonDocument inLotusNotes
As you can see in Figure 121, the fields for the Notes user ID were filled in from
the NT user account.
3.3.3.2 Adding Multiple Users from Windows NT to Lotus Notes
To add multiple user IDs at the same time:
1. Start the User Manager for Domains.
2. Select the users you wi sh to add as Lotus Notes users.
Figure 122. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:SelectingMultipleUsers
3. From the Notes menu,select Add selected NT users to Notes.
Figure 123. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:RegistrationOptions
4. To start the registration process,select the Begin Registration button.
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Figure 124. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:BeginRegistration
The system will create all of the ID files for the users, certify them with the
certification ID specified and finally create all of the user′s mail files.
You can choose to register the users without specifying any passwords (quick
installation).
Figure 125. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:QuickInstallation
The system will generate random numbers for passwords and store them on the
Lotus Notes server in a database called NTSYNC45.NSF.If this database isn′t
present on the server, one will be created for you.
Figure 126. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:NewUser PasswordDatabase
This newly created database contains only one view listing the user names and
the creation date.
Figure 127. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:NewUser PasswordsView
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Select a document and open it to see the user password.
Figure 128. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:NewUser Password
3.3.4 Creating Users
In addition to adding users that are already registered in Windows NT, the
administrator can choose to register new users and create them in both
environments at the same time.
3.3.4.1 Creating Users from Lotus Notes
1. Start the Lotus Notes Client.
2. Select the File - Tools - Server Administration menu items.
Figure 129. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:Server AdministrationMenu
3. Click on the People button and choose Register Person from the menu that
appears.
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Figure 130. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:Server Administration-Register Person
4. Lotus Notes wi l l prompt you wi th a license question.Make sure you have
enough licenses and click on the Yes button.
Figure 131. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:LicenseQuestion
5. Edit al l the fields to reflect your server policies.Don′t forget to check the Add
NT User Account(s) and select an initial Windows NT group for the user.
Figure 132. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:Register Person
6. In the Basic section of the Register Person request form there is a new field
for specifying the NT User Name. Change this to fit your Windows NT naming
conventions if you have any.
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Figure 133. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:Register Person-BasicSection
7. The Mai l secti on should also be edited to match your server policies.
Figure 134. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:Register Person-Mail Section
8. Click on the Register button to start the registration process.
9. The user has now been regi stered both i n Lotus Notes (Figure 135 on
page 84) and in Windows NT (Figure 136 on page 84).
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Figure 135. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:User RecordinLotusNotes
Figure 136. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:User RecordsinWindowsNT
3.3.4.2 Creating Users from Windows NT
1. Start the User Manager (for Domains).
2. In order to synchroni ze the new user wi th Lotus Notes,check Enable Notes
User Registration in the Notes menu (Figure 111 on page 75).
3. Select User - New User and fill i n the fields as you normal l y would.There′s
no need to give the user a password though, as you will have to reenter it
anyway in the next screen.
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Figure 137. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:NewUser
4. When that is compl eted sel ect the Add button and a Notes User request form
will pop up asking you for confirmation of the user name and to enter a
password common to Windows NT and Lotus Notes.
Figure 138. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:NotesUser Information
5. Select the Close button if you don′t want to add more users.
6. To start the registration process,click on the Begin Registration button (see
Figure 119 on page 78).
7. Click on the OK button to finish the registration process.
8. The newl y added user shows up i n Wi ndows NT and i n Lotus Notes.
Figure 139 on page 86 shows the fields from the Person document on the
Lotus Notes server.
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Figure 139. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:PersonDocument inLotusNotes
3.3.5 Deleting Users
Deleting users from either system requires consideration as re-creation of users
doesn′t restore the previous access levels or database assignments.However,
if a user document is deleted from the NAB using the Delete key instead of the
Delete User Action, all user entry′s will still be left in the server(s) Access
Control Lists (ACLs).Creating a new user with the exact same name and
organization will grant that user the current rights in the databases as Lotus
Notes verifies the user′s access to a database by comparing the user name with
the entry in the ACL.
3.3.5.1 Deleting Users from Windows NT
When deleting users from Windows NT, nothing will be synchronized with Lotus
Notes unless you have the Enable Notes User Deletion box checked in the Notes
User Deletion and Rename options (see Figure 116 on page 77).
1. Start the User Manager (for Domains).
2. Mark the sel ected user that you wi sh to remove from both Windows NT and
Lotus Notes.
3. Select User - Delete to remove the user.Don′t use the Delete key on the
keyboard.
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Figure 140. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:WindowsNTDeleteUser Requester
4. Click on the OK button.
In Lotus Notes, a series of administration requests will get generated and put in
the Administration Requests database on your Lotus Notes server.
Figure 141. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:AdministrationRequests
If you choose to delete a user′s mail file, the administration process generates
an Approve File Deletion request that shows up in the Pending Administrators
Approval View of the Administration Requests database.
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Figure 142. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:PendingAdministrator Approval View
To confirm that the mail file should be deleted, you have to open the request in
edit mode and click on Approve File Deletion for ADMINP to process the request.
Figure 143. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:Manual Approvingof FileDeletion
Figure 144. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:Verificationof FileDeletion
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Figure 145. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:Request Successful
3.3.5.2 Deleting Users from Lotus Notes
When working locally from the Notes Desktop, make sure you have all the
databases of interest opened from the server rather than having them opened
locally.Locally opened databases don′t trigger the synchronization process and
nothing will get propagated to Windows NT.
1. Open the NAB from the server.
2. Choose the Person view.
3. Select the user you wi sh to del ete from both Lotus Notes and Windows NT.
4. Select the action button Delete Person.Don′t use the Delete button on the
keyboard.
Figure 146. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:ActionButtonDeletePerson
5. Lotus Notes wi l l prompt you for verification for deleting the selected person.
Click on Yes.
Figure 147. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:DeletePersonVerification
6. You then have to specify how you want the mai l file to be deleted and if this
should remove the users Windows NT account.In this example we want this
to happen.
Figure 148. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:DeleteUser Options
7. Click on the OK button.
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Figure 149. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:Immediateor ViaAdministrationProcess
8. We want to remove the user i mmedi atel y so we click on the Yes button.
Figure 150. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:CompletedSuccessfully
9. A seri es of admi ni strati on requests have been generated and put i n the
Administration Requests database.
Figure 151. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:AdministrationRequests
10.Since deleting a user in this case involves removing a mail file, one of the
administration tasks is pending your approval.
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Figure 152. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:PendingAdministrator Approval
11.Open the document in edit mode and click on the Approve File Deletion
button.
Figure 153. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:ApproveFileDeletion
12.The user is now completely wiped off your systems.The ADMINP may take
a while to perform its chores depending on the ADMINP interval you have
specified in the server document.
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When the requests are done, they will be prefixed with a check mark in the
Administration Requests database.
Figure 154. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:PerformedAdministrationRequests
3.3.6 Renaming Users from Windows NT
The renaming of users doesn′t really rename the person in Lotus Notes; what
gets renamed is the user′s Network account name.To rename a Lotus Notes
person you still have to use the renaming steps described in the
Lotus Notes
Administrator
′s Guide and then update the full name in Windows NT accordingly.
We still show how the renaming procedure is done using the Lotus Notes User
Synchronization as this affects the user′s ability to utilize the Lotus Notes Single
Logon Service.
When examining a person document in Lotus Notes the only important field in
this example is the Network account name.
Figure 155. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:NetworkAccount Name
1. Start the User Manager (for Domains).
2. Select User - Rename.
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Figure 156. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:User RenameMenu
3. Enter the person′s new Network account name.
Figure 157. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:RenameRequester
4. Examine the user′s person document i n the NAB and noti ce how the Network
account name has changed but the user′s full name remains unchanged.
Figure 158. LotusNotesUser Synchronization:ChangedNetworkAccount Name
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Chapter 4.Protocol Management
This chapter documents how to set up transport protocols for connectivity
between Windows and other environments.Some of the other environments to
be addressed are:

NetWare

OS/2

MVS

AIX
The transport protocols that we used were:

TCP/IP

NetBEUI (NetBIOS)

NWLink (IPX/SPX)

SNA
The components used for this are:

Windows NT and Windows 95

OS/2 Warp Server V4.0

NetWare V4.1

AIX Connections on AIX V4.2

MVS OpenEdition R3
Some of the products used for this are:

Communications Server for NT

Microsoft SNA 3.0

PCOMM for NT and OS/2

NetWare Client for Microsoft

Microsoft NetWare Client
4.1 SNA - IBM Personal Communications for Windows NT
To connect to an IBM mainframe you can install IBM Personal Communications
for NT on your Windows NT system.There are several ways to connect to IBM
mainframes using IBM Personal Communications for NT.We only show how to
connect to an IBM host using IBM Personal Communications IEEE 802.2 LAN
interfaces since the TCP/IP customization just requires an IP address and a few
other mi nor parameters.PCOMM can also be installed on the same system as
Communications Server for NT from IBM if Communications Server is installed
first.
To connect to an IBM host using the IBM Personal Communications IEEE 802.2
LAN Interfaces, we had to install the LLC2 driver.When you install IBM Personal
Communications for NT, you will be asked whether you want to install the IBM
Personal Communications IEEE 802.2 LAN Interface.
©
Copyright IBM Corp. 1997
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Figure 159. Personal Communicationfor NTInformationDialog
Selecting Yes to install the 802.2 interface will also get you the LLC2 Driver
Installation Help window.
Figure 160. IBMLLC2Driver InstallationHelp
4.1.1 Installation of LLC2 Protocol
To install the IBM LLC2 Protocol, you should add the network protocol onto NT
Server:
1. Click on Start,point to Settings,and then click on the Control Panel.
2. Double-click on the Network icon.
3. Click on the Protocols tab.
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Figure 161. NetworkProtocol inControl Panel
4. Click on Add.
Figure 162. Select Net Protocol
5. Click on Have Disk.The Insert Disk Window is di spl ayed next.
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Figure 163. Insert Disk
6. Type
C:\Personal Communications.
,if that is the location where you installed
PCOMM.
Figure 164. Personal Communicationfor NT
7. Select IBM LLC2 Protocol and click on OK.
You should see the network protocol show up in the Network window.
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Figure 165. Personal Communicationfor NT
8. Click on Close.The Network Settings wi ndow is displayed.
9. Click on Yes to restart the NT system.
4.1.1.1 Configuring IBM PCOMM for NT with IEEE 802.2 Protocol
To use IBM Personal Communications for NT with IEEE 802.2 protocol, we had to
configure it with the following steps:
1. Click on Start,Programs,and IBM Personal Communications.Then click on
Start or Configure Session to start IBM Personal Communications.
You will get the following information dialog box that will have to be
configured before using it:
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Figure 166. Informationfor RequiringConfiguration
2. Click on OK to continue.
Figure 167. CustomizeCommunication
3. Select:

Interface - LAN

Attachment - LAN via IEEE802.2

Host - S/390
Click on Configure... to customize.
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Figure 168. CustomizeCommunication-3270Host
4. Even though it i s not needed for connectivity,if you wi l l need to use graphi cs
on your 3270 session, you should click on Yes in the Graphics Parameters
section.
5. Click on Configure Link...to confi gure l i nk parameters.
Figure 169. ConfigureLocal System
6. Fill in the Net ID and CP Name of the local PC for PC Location Name.
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The value depend on your SNA network configuration, ask your host
administrator for these information.It is possible that some of these values
are dynamically created at run time.
7. Click on Next to continue.
Figure 170. ConfigureLANConnection
8. Fill i n the Destination address:for the network address of the NCP (3745).
Ask your host administrator for that information.
9. Click on Next to continue.
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Figure 171. ConfigurationComplete
10.Click on Finish to complete configuration.
Figure 172. SavetheConfigurationFile
Note
The PCG file is an SNA node configuration file.It can only be read by the
SNA node control utility.
11.Specify a file name for this configuration and then click on Save to save it.
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Figure 173. CompleteCustomization
12.Click on OK to continue.
Figure 174. CompleteCustomization
13.Click on OK to continue and it will connect you to the host automatically.
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Figure 175. Connect toIBMS/390Host
Note
If you have problems connecting to your host system:

Check your physical connection between your NT system and your
communication controller (3174, 3745) using one of the following: Network
Monitor or Net Watch in the NT Resource Kit.

Check the system definitions in VTAM on your host system.
4.1.2 SNA - IBM Communications Server for Windows NT
In this section we show how to share the SNA LU on the workstation without
IBM′s LLC2 protocol, and connect to MVS using the TCP/IP protocol.
4.1.2.1 Installation of IBM Communications Server for Windows NT
When installing IBM Communications Server for Windows NT, you will
automatically get the following window after you put the CD into the drive.
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Figure 176. IBMCommunicationsServer for WindowsNT
1. Double-click on the Communications Server for Windows NT icon to run the
Installation Program.
After copying the temporary files to Windows NT Server system, you will get
the welcome window and then you will be able to configure it.
Figure 177. Administrator andConfigurationUser ID
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2. Fill i n the admi ni strator ID for Communi cati ons Server.This ID must be i n
the administrator group.
3. Click on Next to continue the installation.
Figure 178. Start CopyingFiles
4. Click on Next to copy the files.
Figure 179. Connect toIBMS/390Host
5. If you want to use the IBM Communi cati ons Server IEEE 802.2 LAN interface,
click on Yes to install it; otherwise, click on No.
We recommend that you install this interface if you think there is a chance
that you will use it at all.The installation method is the same as the one to
install the IEEE 802.2 interface in IBM Personal Communications.See 4.1,
“SNA - IBM Personal Communications for Windows NT” on page 95 for
details on that.
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Figure 180. Connect toIBMS/390Host
After the installation is complete, you will see a new program group named
IBM Communications Server.You will find it in the Windows NT Start task
bar.
4.1.2.2 Configure IBM Communications Server for Windows NT
To connect to an IBM host (MVS or OS/390) as a TN3270 Server, a Windows NT
Server running Communications Server needs some information about the SNA
configuration.

Fully qualified CP Name

CP Alias

Network Destination Address of Communication Controller (3745, 3174)
To configure IBM Communications Server for Windows NT:
1. Click on Start,Programs,IBM Communications Server and then click on SNA
Node Configuration to configure the SNA node.
You will get the blank SNA Node Configuration window shown in the
following window:
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Figure 181. SNANodeConfiguration
Use the Help window for hints on how to configure it.
Figure 182. SNANodeConfiguration-HelpWindow
2. Use the pul l -down menu under File and click on New.
It will automatically switch to the following window, which lists all possible
scenarios.
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Figure 183. SNANodeConfiguration-NewConfiguration
3. In this case,select TN3270E Server.
Figure 184. SNANodeConfiguration/TN3270EServer
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4. Select Configure Node and click on New to create a new node configuration.
Figure 185. SNANodeConfiguration/DefineaNode
5. Fill in the following information:

Fully qualified CP name

CP alias (not required)
Ask your MVS SNA coordinator to get this information for you.Click on OK
to complete this configuration.
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Figure 186. SNANodeConfiguration/ConfigureaDevice
6. Select Configure Devices for Configuration options and select LAN for DLCs
(data link control).
7. Click on New...to create a new configuration.
Figure 187. SNANodeConfiguration/DefineaLANDevice
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As a TN3270E server, you don′t have to change any of the parameters here.
8. Click on OK to compl ete the definition.
Figure 188. SNANodeConfiguration/ConfiguretheGateway
9. Select Configure the Gateway for Configuration options and click on
View/Change/Add to create a new configuration.
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Figure 189. SNANodeConfiguration/DefineaGatewayConfiguration
10.Click on Create... to create a host link.
Figure 190. SNANodeConfiguration/Host LinkType
11.Select LAN for the DLC type for your host connection.Click on OK to
continue.
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Figure 191. SNANodeConfiguration/DefineaLANConnection
12.Fill in the network address of the NCP (3745) or 3174 in the Destination
address field and click on OK to continue.
Figure 192. SNANodeConfiguration/AssignNewLUs
You have to create/assign LUs (logical units) to this link.
13.Click on Yes to continue.
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Figure 193. SNANodeConfiguration/Host LUDefinition
14.Fill in the Base LU name, Start NAU address and the Number of LUs fields.
Note
The LU name is used in the local system.You can use any name you
want.The number of LUs is dependent on how many LUs belong to this
PU, which is defined in VTAM at the host.
15.Click on OK and you will get an LU list.
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Figure 194. SNANodeConfiguration/AssignedLUs
16.Click on OK to continue and it will take you back to the following window:
Figure 195. SNANodeConfiguration-TN3270EParameter
17.Select the TN3270E tab.
18.Select PUBLIC as the Default pool and click on OK to complete.
19.Save this configuration and give it a name that you want it to be known as.
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Figure 196. SNANodeConfiguration/SavetheConfiguration
The SNA Node Configuration is now complete.
4.1.2.3 Start the TN3270E Server
To start the TN3270E Server:
1. Click on Start,Programs,IBM Communications Server and then SNA Node
Operations.
You will get the SNA Node Operations window.
Figure 197. Start aSNANode
2. Select Operations and click on Start Node....
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3. Select a configuration and click on Open.
After a short period of time you will see the following:
Figure 198. AStartedSNANode
Now that you have defined a gateway you can use the TN3270 emulation
program, running on the same system or another system, to TELNET to this
gateway server and connect to MVS.
4.1.3 SNA - Microsoft SNA Server for Windows NT
In this section we show how to share the SNA LU on a workstation without the
DLC protocol, and connect to MVS using the TCP/IP protocol using Microsoft
SNA Server.
4.1.3.1 Installation and Configuration of SNA Server
In this session, we assume that your NT system will use the DLC protocol to
connect to the MVS host.Therefore, you will have to install the DLC protocol
first.
The installation of Microsoft SNA Server for Windows NT is similar to other
software, so we do not document the installation procedure in this section.
To run the SNA Server program, simply:
1. Click on Start,Programs,Microsoft SNA Server (Common) and then Manager
to open the SNA Server Manager program.You will get the following
wi ndow:
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Figure 199. Microsoft SNAServer/Welcome
After the initial window you will get the following:
Figure 200. SNAServer/Manager
If this is the first time that you are using SNA Server, you can click on Begin
Here (Figure 199) to get to the Help window.
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Figure 201. SNAServer/HelpWindow
2. From the Windows NT Control Panel wi ndow,sel ect Network.
3. Click on the DLC protocol.
Now you have to insert a link service.
4. In the Insert menu,click on the Link Service to add a new link service.
Figure 202. SNAServer/Insert LinkService
5. Select DLC 802.2 Link Service and click on Add.
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Figure 203. SNAServer/DLC802.2LinkServiceProperties
6. Change the Title if you want.
7. Select an adapter.
8. Set up the Local Service Access Point (SAP) and then click on OK.
Figure 204. SNAServer -LinkServiceAdded
Clicking on OK will bring you back to the following window:
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Figure 205. SNAServer
9. Click on Finish to complete.
Then you should see that there is one adapter in the SNA Server called
SNADLC1.
Figure 206. SNAServer -LinkServiceAdded
10.In the Insert pull-down menu, click on Connection to add a new connection.
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Figure 207. SNAServer/ConnectionProperties/General
11.Give it a connection name.
12.Select one link service.
13.Click on the Address tab.
Figure 208. SNAServer/ConnectionProperties/Address
14.Fill in the Remote Network Address with the network address of the 3745 or
3174 (see your SNA network administrator).
15.Click on the System Identification tab.
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Figure 209. SNAServer/ConnectionProperties/SystemIdentification
16.Fill in the net ID in the Network Name field.
17.Fill in the CP name for the Control Point Name.
18.Click on the 802.2 DLC tab.
Figure 210. SNAServer/ConnectionProperties/802.2DLC
The default values in Figure 210 worked for us.
19.Click on OK.
Then you will have to configure 3270 access.First, you have to add some
LUs for the connection.
20.In the Insert menu, point to 3270 and then click on Display LU.
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Figure 211. SNAServer/3270LUProperties
21.Fill in the LU Name.
In addition, click on the Display Model and Associated Printer tabs to change
their parameters.Then click on OK.
After adding three LUs called SNALU002, SNALU003 and SNALU004, you will
get the following window.
Figure 212. SNAServer -LUAdded
You can either add the LUs one at a time or all three at once.
22.In the Insert pull-down menu, point to 3270 and then click on the Range of
LUs.
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Figure 213. SNAServer/LUCreationWizardPart 1of 2
23.Specify the Domain, Server, Connection and LU Type and click on Next.
Figure 214. SNAServer/LUCreationWizardPart 2of 2
24.Enter the Base LU Name.
25.Enter the First LU Number.
26.Enter the Number of LUs.
27.Enter the First Extension.
28.Click on Finish to create the LUs.
After the link service, connection and LUs have been created, you have to
assign a user, group or workstation to SNA Server.
29.In the Insert menu, click on User.
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Figure 215. SNAServer/AddUsersandGroups
30.Select the users or groups you want to add and click on Add.
31.Click on OK to finish.
You then have to assign the LUs to these users, groups or workstations.
32.Select the LUs and drag them on top of the desired user or workstation.
33.From the File pull-down menu, click on Save to save these settings.
Figure 216. SNAServer/User withLUs
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After you have installed and configured SNA Server you can use the 3270 applet
provided by SNA Server (or Client) to connect to SNA Server over TCP/IP and
then connect to the host.
4.1.3.2 Installation and Configuration of SNA Server Client
For other workstations to access the host system, you don′t have to install the
SNA Server, you only install the SNA Servers client code.You use the client
code to connect to SNA Server to get to the host system.In order to install the
SNA Server client code, you will need to do the following:
1. Run the program
\CLIENT\WINNT\I386\SETUP.EXE
from the installation CD or
code drive.
2. Step through the i ni ti al wi ndows until you get to:
Figure 217. Client for SNAServer Setup
3. Click on Select Components.
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Figure 218. SNAServer Client/Select Components
4. Select the opti ons you want to use.
5. Click on Continue.
Figure 219. SNAServer Client/Select Client Server Protocol
6. Choose the protocol you want to use and cl i ck on Continue.
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Figure 220. SNAServer Client/Client Mode
7. Select the method your client wi l l use to search for the SNA Server.There
are two ways to look for the SNA Server:
a.Client locates servers in an SNA Server subdomain.
b.Client locates servers by name.
We chose Client locates servers by name.
8. Click on Continue.
Figure 221. SNAServer Client/RemoteServer Names
9. Fill i n the pri mary SNA server name and the backup SNA server name if you
have set one up.
10.Click on Continue.
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Figure 222. SNAServer Client
You will get a window showing you that it is copying the files.
After the files have been copied the installation is done and you have to reboot
your system.Before you use the Client for SNA Server you will still have to
configure it.
1. Click on Start,Programs,Microsoft SNA Server Client and then Config Client.
You will get the following window:
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Figure 223. SNAServer Client/Client Configuration/Protocol
2. Select the protocol you want to use.
3. Click on the Client Mode tab.
Figure 224. SNAServer Client/Client Configuration/Mode
4. Select the method that the client should use to locate the server.
If you use the Client locates server by name, you have to fill in the server
name.
5. Click on OK to complete.
6. Click on Start,Programs,Microsoft SNA Server Client and then 3270 Applet.
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It will automatically connect you to SNA Server and get the logical unit you
need to connect to the host with.
Figure 225. SNAServer Client/3270Applet
4.1.4 IPX/SPX - Gateway (and Client) Services for NetWare
To access files or printers on a NetWare server, a service must be used, such as
the Client Service for NetWare (CSNW) on Windows NT Workstation or the
Gateway Service for NetWare (GSNW) on Windows NT Server.
4.1.4.1 Client Service for NetWare
To access files or printers on a NetWare server you only have to install the
Client Service for NetWare.
4.1.4.2 Installation
To install the Gateway Service for NetWare, you need to add a network service
to the NT Server.
1. Log on to the system as a user wi th admi ni strator rights.
2. Click on Start,point to Settings and click on Control Panel.
3. Double-click on Network.
4. Click on the Services tab.
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Figure 226. NetworkServicesinControl Panel
5. Click on Add....
The Select Network Service dialog box appears.
Figure 227. AddGatewayServicefor NetWare
6. Click on Gateway (and Client) Services for NetWare and click on OK.
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Since it needs some additional files for Windows NT Server, point to either
your NT Server CD-ROM or your LAN drive that has an image of the
CD-ROM on it.
Figure 228. WindowsNTSetup
7. Click on Continue to copy the requi red files.
Figure 229. CopyRequiredFiles
You should notice that there is now a Network Service - Gateway (and Client)
Service for NetWare installed.
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Figure 230. Gateway(andClient) Servicesfor NetWareInstalled
8. Click on Close to compl ete the network change.
Figure 231. SystemRestart Required-NetworkSettingsChange
9. Click on Yes to restart system.
After the system has been rebooted, you will find a new icon GSNW in the
Control Panel.
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Figure 232. GateServicefor NetWareinControl Panel
10.Double-click on GSNW and you will get the Gateway Service for NetWare
setup dialog box.
Select a preferred server and then you can access that NetWare server.
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Figure 233. Client Servicefor NetWare-Setup
To map a NetWare resource as a Network drive:

Right-click on the Network Neighborhood.

Click on Map Network Drive....
You should get a window similar to the one that follows:
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Figure 234. Client Servicefor NetWare-MapNetworkDrive
Select a Drive, Path and whether to Reconnect at Login and then click on
OK.You can now access the new network drive.You may need to fill in the
field Connect As if the user ID that you will be authenticating the ID with is
different from the one that you are currently logged on as.
4.1.4.3 Gateway Service for NetWare
To use the disk or printer from a NetWare server and share them with other
clients, you have to install the Gateway Service for NetWare on the Windows NT
Server.
The Gateway Service for NetWare (GSNW) provides Windows NT Server
connections to NetWare servers, and shares the network connections, for
example, a gateway, from a NetWare server.This service allows the Windows
NT Server to access the NetWare server as just another client and allows the
network clients to access files on the NetWare server without having to have a
NetWare client re-director (service) over an IPX/SPX protocol.
The Gateway Service for NetWare depends on two protocols being installed on
Windows NT Server.You need to have the NWLink protocol and the NWLink
NetBIOS installed.NWLink is an implementation of the internetworking packet
exchange (IPX) and sequenced packet exchange (SPX) transport protocols used
by the NetWare network.NWLink NetBIOS is a Microsoft-enhanced
implementation of Novell NetBIOS, and transmits Novell NetBIOS packets
between a NetWare server running Novell NetBIOS and a Windows NT computer,
or between two Windows NT computers.
NWLink and NWLink NetBIOS can coexist with other protocols on the same
network adapter card.The Windows NT Server establishes a network
connection to the NetWare server similar to any network client connection.
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Note:Before you install the Gateway Service for NetWare, you have to remove
any existing NetWare redirector, such as NetWare Services for Windows
NT from Novell, and then restart your computer.
4.1.4.4 Enable a Gateway
Before enabling the gateway server for NetWare on Windows NT Server, you
have to check that:

A user account has been created on the NetWare server with necessary
rights for the resources you want to access.

The NetWare server must have a group named NTGATEWAY with necessary
rights for the resources you want to access.

The NetWare user account you use must be a member of the NTGATEWAY
group.
4.1.5 IPX/SPX - NetWare Client for Windows NT
The other way to access NetWare Server Resources from Windows NT Server is
to install the Novell NetWare Client for Windows NT.
4.1.5.1 Installation
To install the NetWare Client for Windows NT you need to add a network service
to the NT Server.Unlike the installation of the Gateway Service for NetWare, we
used the standard type or installation process to install the NetWare Client for
Windows NT.
1. Log on to the system as a user wi th admi ni strator pri vi l eges.
2. Click on Start and Run.
Figure 235. RuntheNetWareClient for WindowsNT-InstallationProgram
3. Enter the location of the NetWare Client for Windows NT,and click on OK.
The Novell NetWare Client 4.0 Installation dialog will be displayed.
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Figure 236. Novell NetWareClient 4.0Installation
4. Click on Continue.
If your Windows NT Server already has the Gateway Service for NetWare
installed (Microsoft Client Service for NetWare), the NetWare Client for
Windows NT Installation Program will remove it.
Figure 237. RemoveMicrosoft Client for NetWarebyInstallationProgram
5. Click on Yes to continue.
The installation program will copy the files to your hard drive.
Figure 238. CopyingFiles
After the installation is complete, the Windows NT system will need to be
rebooted.
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Figure 239. InstallationComplete
6. Click on Reboot to reboot your Windows NT system.
After Windows NT is rebooted you will find a new item in the task bar.Under
Programs a group named NetWare (Common) will be created.In addition, a
new icon will appear in the Control Panel in place of the GSNW icon.
Figure 240. NetWareIconinControl Panel
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You will also find the new Network Service - Novell NetWare Client for
Windows NT.
Figure 241. NetworkService-Novell NetWareClient for WindowsNT
4.1.5.2 Using the NetWare Client for Windows NT
The NetWare Client for Windows NT provides a graphical user interface.You
can click on Start and point to Programs.Then click on NetWare (Common) and
click on NetWare GUI Login to use this GUI application.
Figure 242. Novell NetWareClient for WindowsNTGUI/Login
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1. Using this GUI application you can l og i n to the NetWare server.
Figure 243. Novell NetWareClient for WindowsNTGUI/Connection
2. Specify whi ch tree or server you want to connect to.
Figure 244. Novell NetWareClient for WindowsNTGUI/Script
3. Specify the l ogi n and profi l e script.
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Figure 245. Novell NetWareClient for WindowsNTGUI/Variables
4. Specify the vari abl es for the l ogi n script.You wi l l find there are four new
items when you click on Network Neighborhood:

Change NetWare Password - Changes the password on the NetWare
server.
Figure 246. ChangePassword
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Figure 247. Current NetWareResources

NetWare Connections - Gets the current NetWare resources for this
connection.
Figure 248. CaptureNetWarePrinter Port

Capture Printer Port - Adds a network printer or to assign this connection
to a network print server defined in NetWare Server.
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Figure 249. MapNetworkDrive

End Capture - Disables the network printer on the NetWare server.
4.1.6 IBM Networks Coordinated Logon Client for NT
To log on to OS/2 Warp Server or LAN Server, you will need to install the IBM
Networks Coordinated Logon Client for NT.It provides your Windows NT system
with all of the IBM OS/2 Warp Server functions, such as:

Connecting to home directories

Setting up and connecting to logon assignments

Running shared applications

Connecting to aliases

Checking DASD limits
4.1.6.1 Prerequisites
The following prerequisite components need to be installed on your NT system
before you can install the IBM Networks Client:

Microsoft Workstation Service

An appropriate network adapter device driver

NetBEUI or TCP/IP
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4.1.6.2 Installation
To install the IBM Networks Client, you must add a network service into your NT
server.
1. Log on to the system as a user wi th admi ni strator rights.
2. Click on Start,point to Settings,and click on the Control Panel.
3. Double-click on Network.
4. Click on the Services tab.
Figure 250. NetworkServicesinControl Panel
5. Click on Add....
The Select Network Service dialog box appears.
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Figure 251. Select NetworkService
6. Click on Have Disk....The Insert Disk Window is displayed.
Figure 252. Insert Disk
7. Insert the IBM Networks Coordinated Logon Client for Windows NT diskette
into the A: drive, and then click on OK.Of course, you can also install the
code from a CD or a LAN drive.
Figure 253. Select IBMNetworksCoordinatedLogonClient for WindowsNT
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8. Select IBM Networks Coordinated Logon Client for Windows NT,and then
click on OK to copy the files.
Figure 254. CopyIBMNetworksClient for WindowsNTFiles
The IBM Networks Client Properties notebook is displayed after the files are
copied.
9. Click on the General tab.
Figure 255. IBMNetworksClient Properties/General
10.In the Domain name box, type the name of the default logon IBM OS/2 Warp
Server domain.
11.In the Alternate domain name box, if you want to use an alternative domain,
type the name of the alternative domain.
12.Click on the Advanced tab.
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Figure 256. IBMNetworksClient Properties/Advanced
13.If you select the button to specify the name of your logon server, you must
enter the name of the logon server.
14.Click on OK to complete.
At this time you will get the following message:
Figure 257. IBMNetworksClient/SetupMessage
See 4.1.6.3, “Coordinating the User Accounts” on page 154 for more
information.
15.Click on OK. The Network notebook will be displayed.
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Figure 258. NetworkServicesinControl Panel
16.Click on Close. The network bindings for the various protocols you have
selected will get configured.
Figure 259. NetworkServicesBinding
The Network Settings Change window is displayed.
Figure 260. NetworkSettingsChange
17.Click on Yes to restart the NT system.
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4.1.6.3 Coordinating the User Accounts
The Windows NT user account and IBM OS/2 Warp Server domain user account
must be synchronized.You have to have a Windows NT user account whose
user name and password also exists in an IBM OS/2 Warp Server domain.To
coordinate the user accounts do one of the following:

If you have a Windows NT user account with a user name that is the same as
our IBM OS/2 Warp Server domain account user name, then you must
change the password on your Windows NT account to be the same as our
password on the IBM OS/2 Warp Server domain user account.

If you do not have a Windows NT user account with a user name that is the
same as our IBM OS/2 Warp Server domain account user name, then you
must create one.Use the Windows NT User Manager utility to create a
Windows NT account.
4.1.6.4 Using IBM Networks Client
Click on Start, Programs, IBM Networks Client (Common) and then click on IBM
Networks Client to start the IBM Networks Client.The following window will be
displayed:
Figure 261. IBMNetworksClient
From the IBM Networks Client, you can do the following functions:

List logged on users

List shared applications

Send messages

Connect a network disk

Connect a network printer

Change the logon assignments
4.2 Network Monitor
Windows NT Server provides a built-in tool for monitoring the network activity.It
is called the Network Monitor.With the Network Monitor, you can capture the
activity of systems connected to your Windows NT Server system.It provides
four status views:

Total Stats

Session Stats

Station Stats
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Graph
You can also restrict the data that is to be captured with a filter.It appears that
this monitoring function came from the SMS component of BackOffice.Vi ew
these traces frame by frame.
4.2.1 Capturing Data
To start the capture of network data, click on Start, Programs, Administrative
Tools (Common) and Network Monitor.The following window will be displayed.
Figure 262. NetworkMonitor
Click on Capture and Start to start capturing data.
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Figure 263. NetworkMonitor/CapturingData
There are four windows that provide statistics in Network Monitor:

Total Stats

Session Stats

Station Stats

Graph
4.2.1.1 Total Stats
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Figure 264. NetworkMonitor/Total Stats
There is a lot of information available in this window, including:

Network Statistics

Captured Statistics

Per Second Statistics

Network Card(MAC) Statistics

Network Card(MAC) Error Statistics
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4.2.1.2 Session Stats
Figure 265. NetworkMonitor/SessionStats
In this window, you can determine how many sessions have been established
between your Windows NT Server and other machines.It includes the network
address of the sender and receiver.You can change the network address to a
name, a computer name or a user name.You can select any network address of
session you want to change, click the right button and select Edit Address.
Figure 266. NetworkMonitor/SessionStats/Edit Address
Fill in the name of the machine and click on OK.You will then get a new
session list.
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Figure 267. NetworkMonitor/SessionStats
Now it is easier to identify the resource you want to analyze.
4.2.1.3 Station Stats
Figure 268. NetworkMonitor/StationStats
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In this window, you can see detailed data about the station communicating with
your Windows NT Server system.You have the following information provided to
you here:

Network Address

Frames Sent

Frames Received

Bytes Sent

Bytes Received

Directed Frames Sent

Multicasts Sent

Broadcasts Sent
You can also change the network address to be a name just like you did with
Session Stats.
4.2.1.4 Graph
Figure 269. NetworkMonitor/Graph
This window graphically presents the network statistics.It includes the following
information:

% Network Uti l i zati on

Frames Per Second

Bytes Per Second

Broadcasts Per Second

Multicasts Per Second
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4.2.2 Capturing Data with Filters
In general, when the network is stable, you don′t need to capture all of the
network data on your NT system.In some cases, you just want to capture
specific data for a specific session.In that case you would set up a filter.
4.2.2.1 Capture Filter
To create a filter in the Network Monitor, you can press F8 or click on Capture in
the menu bar of the main window of Network Monitor.Then click on Filter.
Figure 270. NetworkMonitor/Graph
You can change the protocol you want to monitor or change the address pair
you want to capture.In addition, you can change the pattern you want to
analyze.
For example, you can specify the network protocol you want to capture.You can
select:SAP/ETYPE = Any SAP or Any ETYPE and click on Line... in the Edit
field.You will get the Capture Filter SAPs and ETYPEs window.
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Figure 271. NetworkMonitor/CaptureFilter SAPsandETYPEs
You can also disable all protocols first, then select just the network protocol you
want to capture and enable it.
4.2.3 View the Captured Data
After you stop capturing data, you can click on Stop and View to stop and view
the data you just captured or you can save it as a capture file *.cap then select
Open to view it.
After you open a capture file, you will see:
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Figure 272. NetworkMonitor/Graph
In this window, you can trace the network data frame by frame, or look at it field
by field.You can also see the data in hex.This is helpful in the problem
determination process on your network.
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Chapter 5.Performance Management
This chapter documents how to gather performance information and report on it
in a Windows NT environment.
5.1 Windows NT Built-In Tools
Windows NT provides some built-in tools for performance management:

Event Viewer

Performance Moni tor

Task Manager

Network Moni tor
5.1.1 Event Viewer
Windows NT Server provides a built-in management function called the Event
Viewer.The Event Viewer can view each event logged by the system.You can
not access the data using the file manager, or the explorer function as all event
data is accessed using an API.You can also view the event of other NT systems
if you have the right administrator privileges.
To access the Event Viewer application you can click on Start, Programs,
Administrative Tools (Common) and the Event Viewer option.You can also issue
the eventvwr command which is typically found in the \winnt\system32 directory.
If you have the Windows NT Resources Kit installed on your system it provides a
utility called DUMPEL.EXE to dump the event log.The dumpel /? command will
give you all of the options that you can use.In addition to just dumping out into
a flat file the system, security or application event log, you can also provide
some filtering as to what gets written to the file.See 6.1.2.1, “Event Viewer
Setup” on page 196 for more information.
Figure 273. Event Viewer
There are three kind of events logged by NT system:
©
Copyright IBM Corp. 1997
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System

Security

Appl i cati on
You may select each of them to get the detail information.
Figure 274. Event Viewer/System,Security,Application
If you feel too many events are displayed in the window, you may filter them; just
select View from the main menu bar, then select Filter Events.
Figure 275. Event Viewer/Filter
Select your filters and click on OK.You will only see the events that pass your
filter.
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Figure 276. Event Viewer/Filter Events
Double-click on each event to get detail information for each event.
Figure 277. Event Viewer/Detail Information
Each event contains the following information:

Date

Ti me

User

Computer
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Event ID

Source

Type

Category

Description

Data (in bytes and words mode)
With this information, you will know more about what is going on in your NT
system.In addition, you should be aware that the Tivoli Event Console (TEC) has
an adapter that can be installed on Windows NT so that all of the events can be
forwarded to the Tivoli Management Platform for further processing, correlation
and action.
5.1.2 Performance Monitor
Windows NT provides other useful built-in functions.An example of this is the
Performance Monitor.
Click on Start, Programs, Administrative Tools (Common) and Performance
Monitor to show the Performance Monitor.
There are four views in Performance Monitor: Chart, Alert, Log and Report.
Figure 278. PerformanceMonitor/Chart
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Figure 279. PerformanceMonitor/Alert
Figure 280. PerformanceMonitor/Log
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Figure 281. PerformanceMonitor/Report
In the following sections, we discuss how to use the Performance Monitor.
5.1.2.1 Add a Monitored Object to a Chart View
In the Chart View, you can use the graphic mode to monitor Windows NT
systems.You can monitor the current activity of Windows NT systems.You can
monitor not only local Windows NT Servers but also other remote Windows NT
V4.0 Servers.If you want to monitor another NT system, you must have a user
ID and password in the administrator group of that system.You can then get the
system information from that system.
1. In the Vi ew menu,cl i ck on Chart to switch to the Chart View.
2. From the Edit menu,cl i ck on Add To Chart and the Add To Chart wi ndow wi l l
displayed.
Figure 282. PerformanceMonitor/Chart/Add1
3. You can select a server you want to moni tor and then you have to select
which objects and counters you want to monitor.
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You can change the display values of the monitored objects.Examples of
things you can change are: color, scale, width and style.
If you don′t understand what the counters mean, you can click on the Explain
button to get more detailed information.
Figure 283. PerformanceMonitor/Chart/Add2
4. Click on Add to add this object to the Chart View.
Repeat the process for additional objects or computers that you want to
moni tor.
5. Click on Done to compl ete your selections.
After you add the monitored objects, you will see:
Figure 284. PerformanceMonitor/Chart/Histogram
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You can change the chart properties if you want a different chart.
6. In the Options menu click on Chart to open the Chart Options dialog box.
Figure 285. PerformanceMonitor/Chart/Options
You can change some of the properties of Chart View for example, legend,
value bar, grid, label, vertical maximum, gallery type and update time.

In Vertical Maximum you just type the maximum value to which the
vertical axis should extend.

In Update Time you select either manual update or periodic update and
then type a number in the interval box to determine the time (in seconds)
between chart updates.

In Gallery click on Graph or Histogram as its format.
Note
The graph time value displayed in the value bar shows the time (in
seconds) that it takes to create a complete chart across the window.
For example, if you change its gallery to be graph, you will get the following
view:
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Figure 286. PerformanceMonitor/Chart/Graph
5.1.2.2 Add a Monitored Object to an Alert View
In the Alert View you can create an alert to monitor your system and then
forward these alerts to another system by doing the following:
1. Click on View and then Chart to switch to the Chart View.
2. Click on Edit and Add To Alert.The Add To Al ert wi ndow wi l l displayed.
Figure 287. PerformanceMonitor/Alert/Add
3. In the Object field select an available object to moni tor.
4. In the Counter field select one or more counters.
5. For the Instance select one or more instances.
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6. For the field l abel ed Al ert If,click on Over or Under and add a value.
7. In Run Program On Alert,click on First Time or Every Time and enter the
complete path name for the program or macro that you want to run
whenever the specified alert occurs.
8. Click on Add.
9. Repeat the process for additional objects or NT systems that you want to
monitor and then click on Done.
Then you can start the monitor.If any alert occurs, you will see the following:
Figure 288. PerformanceMonitor/Alert
Also, the program you specified in the Alert Entry will be run.
5.1.2.3 Forward the Alert to Other NT Systems
The Performance Monitor can forward alerts to other NT systems; just perform
the following steps:
1. From the Options menu,click on Alert.
Figure 289. PerformanceMonitor/Alert/Options
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2. In the Al ert Options dialog box select any combination of the following:

Switch To Alert View

Log Event In Application Log

Send Network Message
3. For a network alert,type the name of the al ert reci pi ent′s computer i n Net
Name, but without typing the back slashes (\\).
4. In Update Time,select ei ther Manual Update or Periodic Update and then
type a number in the Interval box to determine the time (in seconds)
between updates if you click Periodic Update.
5.1.2.4 Log Activity of NT Systems
The Performance Monitor can log the activities on NT systems; just perform the
following steps:
1. From the Vi ew menu click on Log to swi tch to the Log View.
2. From the Edit menu click on Add To Log and the Add To Log wi ndow wi l l
displayed.
Figure 290. PerformanceMonitor/Log/Add
You can collect data from multiple systems into a single log file.Log files
contain detailed data about system bottlenecks and can help with detailed
analysis.For capacity planning you have to view trends over a longer period
of time. That requires the ability to create a log file and to produce reports
from that file.
3. In Objects,select an available object or set of objects to moni tor and then
click on Add.
Repeat the process for any additional systems that you want to monitor.
4. Finally,you can click on Done.
After you are done you will get a list of log objects.
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Figure 291. PerformanceMonitor/Log
To save the log selections in a settings file:
1. From the File pul l -down menu click on Save Log Settings As.
2. In the Performance Moni tor - Save As di al og box enter a path name for the
file that will contain the selections that you want to reuse.Then click on OK.
Figure 292. PerformanceMonitor/Start,StopandSave
To start or stop logging or to save the log file:
1. In the Options menu,click on Log.
2. In the Log Options dialog box click on Start Log.If Start Log is not enabled,
you must enter a log file name and add objects to the log.
3. To stop logging,click on Stop Log.
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4. To save the l og file,click on Save after you start and stop logging.
5.1.2.5 Add a Monitored Object to a Report View
1. From the Vi ew menu click on Report to switch to the Report View.
2. From the Edit menu,cl i ck on Add To Report,and the Add To Report wi ndow
will displayed.This window is the same as shown in Figure 283 on
page 171.
3. You can select a server you want to moni tor and then select whi ch object
and counter you want to monitor.
If you don′t understand what the counter means, you can click on the Explain
button to get more detailed information.
You can change the property of this monitored object in the chart.Examples
of that would be: color, scale, width and style.
4. Click on Add to add this object into the Report View.
Repeat the process for additional objects or systems that you want to
moni tor.
5. Click on Done to compl ete the process.
After you add the monitored objects, you will see:
Figure 293. PerformanceMonitor/Report
There is only one option in the Report View. It relates to the Update Time.
You can select either Manual Update or Periodic Update and then type a
number in the Interval box to determine the time (in seconds) between chart
updates.
5.1.2.6 Working with Current Activity
To work on any view with information about current activity from the File menu
click on New to open a new settings file or click on Open to open an existing
settings file.You can add objects to monitor.From the File menu click on Save
Settings As to save selections in a new settings file.
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If you have updated information in all four views, then from the File pull-down
menu click on Save Workspace to save the current settings for all four views.
You can only open a single chart (.pmc), alert (.pma), log (.pml), or report (.pmr)
settings file or you can open a workspace (.pmw) file with all the options.
5.1.2.7 Working with Logs Files
To work on any of the views with information from the log files:
1. In the Options menu click on Data From.and enter an exi sti ng l og file i n Log
File.
Figure 294. PerformanceMonitor/DataFrom
2. Click on Open from the File menu to open an existing settings file or
workspace file.
3. From the Edit menu click on the Time Window to change the starti ng and
stopping times.
4. In the View menu,select each vi ew you want to see.
5.1.3 Task Manager
The Task Manager is another useful built-in tool in Windows NT.With the Task
Manager you can monitor and control your NT system and you can see what
programs and processes are running on it and your computer′s performance.
To access the Task Manager you need to use the right mouse button on the task
bar and then click on Task Manager.
5.1.3.1 Task Manager - Applications
Click on the Applications tab and you will get an application list.
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Figure 295. TaskManager/Applications
From this window you can:

End Task - Terminates a running application.

Switch to - Brings this application to the foreground.

New Task - Opens an application to run.
5.1.3.2 Task Manager - Processes
Click on the Processes tab to get a list of processes that are running on this NT
system.
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Figure 296. TaskManager/Processes
You can show the following types of information for tasks in the process list:

Image Name

PID (Process Identifier)

CPU Usage

CPU Time

Mem Usage

Mem Usage Delta

Page Faults

Page Faults Delta

Virtual Memory Size

Paged Pool

Non-Paged Pool

Base Priority

Handle Count

Thread Count
You can click on Select Columns from the View pull-down menu to select the
information that you want to display on the Process page of the Task Manager.
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In this window you can also click on End Process to terminate a running process.
Right-click on each process to terminate this process or set its priority.Each
process has four kinds of priorities:

Real time

High

Normal

Low
5.1.3.3 Task Manager - Performance
If you click on the Performance tab you will get some charts and tables similar to
the following:
Figure 297. TaskManager/Performance
This window shows system performance information such as CPU Usage, MEM
Usage and breaks it out into finer detail.
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You can click on Show Kernel Times on the View pull-down menu to enable
or disable the CPU Usage of Kernel in the CPU Usage chart.
You can click on Update Speed in the View pull-down menu to change the update
speed to one of the following:

High

Normal

Low

Paused
5.2 NetFinity Monitoring
NetFinity is a powerful management tool on the Intel platform.There are several
tools in NetFinity that are related to Performance Management.
Figure 298. NetFinityServiceManager
Examples of the NetFinity services that can assist in performance management
are Alert Manager, Process Manager and System Monitor
For more details on NetFinity monitors you can look in
Systems Management
from an NT Server Point of View
, SG24-4723 or NetFinity V5.0 Command Line and
LMU Support
, SG24-4925.
To start NetFinity you can click on Start, Programs, NetFinity and NetFinity
Service Manager to start the NetFinity Service Manager.
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5.2.1 Alert Manager
Figure 299. NetFinity/Alert Manager
The Alert Manager is an extendable facility that allows the receiving and
processing of application-generated alerts.Several features of Alert Manager
include:

Simplifying application use and processing of alerts.

Providing standard response actions to alert:
− Log alert to file
− Display alert in pop-up window
− Forward alert to another workstation
− Execute a program
− Dial out to a digital pager
− Generate an SNMP version of the alert
− Play a waveform (WAV) file

Providing extensive configurable alert management and action generation.
A variety of actions can be taken in response to alerts, including alert logging,
pop-up user notification, forwarding the alert to another system, program
execution, or an application-defined action.
Alerts can be generated as a result of thresholds being reached by a system
performance moni tor.
5.2.2 Process Manager
Figure 300. NetFinity/ProcessManager Icon
You can use the NetFinity Process Manager to view detail information on all
processes running on your NT system.With the Process Manager, you can:

Run Command - Runs a single command on the system.

Process Alert - Sets up some condition for generating a NetFinity alert.
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Close Applications - Closes an application running on a Windows system.
When you double-click the Process Manager icon in the NetFinity window the
NetFinity Process Manager window will be displayed.
Figure 301. NetFinityProcessManager
5.2.3 System Monitor
Figure 302. NetFinitySystemMonitor Icon
The System Monitor provides some charts and reports to monitor the activity of
many of components in your NT system.It can continuously monitor:

Locked memory usage

Virtual memory usage

CPU usage

DASD space available and space remaining

DASD utilization
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TCP/IP protocol functions

Processes running

Threads running

Pentium processor computations

RAID Device attributes

Read/Write errors (NetFinity Manager only)
The System Monitor has the following features:

Continuous monitoring

Export System Monitor data to an ODBC database

Detachable, sizeable, scalable and user-configurable monitors

User definable thresholds that will generate NetFinity alerts when exceeded

Line graph, text, and real-time graphic representation
If you double-click on the System Monitor icon in NetFinity window you will get
the System Monitor Service window.Click on Show Monitors... to get a list of
moni tors..
Figure 303. NetFinity/SystemMonitor/Select VisibleMonitors
Select the monitors you want to use and click on Accept.For example, we
selected CPU Utilization and Drive C: Space Remaining.As a result of that the
following two monitors showed up on our desktop:
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Figure 304. NetFinity/SystemMonitor/CPUUtilization
Figure 305. NetFinity/SystemMonitor/SpaceRemaining
5.2.3.1 Change the Monitors Properties
From any of the NetFinity monitors you can use the right mouse button to change
its settings:
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Figure 306. NetFinity/SystemMonitor/Propertyof Monitor
You can change the view type and the detail settings for each view.
5.2.3.2 Define a Threshold for a Monitor
If you double-click anywhere within the Monitor window, the Threshold
Configuration window will displayed.
Figure 307. NetFinity/SystemMonitor/ThresholdConfiguration
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1. Type i n a Threshol d Name and press Enter.
2. Set a Durati on val ue for the moni tor.
3. Set a Resend val ue for the monitor.
4. Select a State whi ch,if reported by the moni tored attribute,wi l l generate a
NetFinity alert.
5. Select a Severity for the alert that wi l l be generated if the specified state is
reported.
6. Select an Appl i cati on Al ert Type to be used for the generated alert.
7. Select a Type of Al ert to be used for the generated alert.
8. Select Notify (optional).
If you want an alert to be sent to the NetFinity Alert Manager select the
Notify check box for this threshold.
9. Select Create to save these threshold values.If you have been edi ti ng a
previously configured threshold, select Change to save the new threshold
values.
We defined a threshold CPUHigh in Figure 307 on page 187.When the CPU
usage is higher than 95% you will get the notify window.
Figure 308. NetFinity/SystemMonitor/NotifyWindow
5.3 Lotus Notes Performance
Note
Whenever the term Lotus Notes Server is mentioned in this section, it refers
to the Lotus Notes server process rather than the physical Lotus Notes
server computer itself.
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Lotus Notes Domino comes with a set of server statistics that you can tie in to
the Windows NT Performance Monitor for logging and/or alerting.All add-in
programs that report statistics to the Notes server (for example, the SMTP/MIME
MTA) can be monitored using the Performance Monitor.
5.3.1 Installing the Lotus Notes Performance Monitor
The easiest way to install the Lotus Notes Performance Monitor is to do it while
installing the Lotus Notes server.By default, this option is
not checked when
you choose the customized install process so you have to make sure you check
it manually.
If you have already installed the Lotus Notes Server but didn′t install the Notes
Performance Monitor, run the installation program again and select only the
Notes Performance Monitor using the customized installation.
Figure 309. LotusNotesPerformanceMonitoring:InstallingPerformanceMonitor
When the installation is done, execute
notesreg.bat
with a parameter pointing to
the path for your Notes directory.Assuming your Notes directory is C:\Notes,
you would type:
Notesreg.bat C:\Notes
The following modifications are done to your registry, still assuming the path to
your Notes directory is C:\Notes:
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HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\notestat\Performance
Library = REG_SZ C:\Notes\nnotes.dll
Open = REG_SZ OpenStatPerformanceData
Collect = REG_SZ CollectStatPerformanceData
Close = REG_SZ CloseStatPerformanceData
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\EventLog\Application\notestat
EventMessageFile = REG_EXPAND_SZ C:\Notes\nnotes.dll
TypesSupported = REG_DWORD 0x07
Finally, the batch file (notesreg.bat) updates the Performance Monitor counters in
the registry from the file notestat.ini by issuing the
lodctr notestat.ini
command.
These two registry keys get modified as a result of that:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\notestat
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Perflib
5.3.2 Un-Installing the Lotus Notes Performance Monitor
To remove the Notes statistic counter from the Performance Monitor, issue the
unlodctr notestat
command.This only disables the registry reference from the
Performance Monitor.The notestat information in the registry for Lotus Notes
will still have to be manually removed.There′s no need for it to be removed but
those of you who want a clean registry, see 5.3.1, “Installing the Lotus Notes
Performance Moni tor” on page 189 for information on what registry items to edit.
5.3.3 Getting the Instances Up and Running
The Windows NT Performance Monitor polls given counters in real time for
statistics. This means that you can′t monitor something that isn′t running or
started.If you start the Performance Monitor without having the Lotus Notes
Server running, the Lotus Notes object will not show up in the Add to Chart
requester.
Even when the Lotus Notes server has been started and the Lotus Notes object
shows up in the Add to Chart requester, very few instances may be visible. This
is due to the fact that Lotus Notes doesn′t report statistics on modules that
haven′t been initialized yet. The best way to activate the basic modules is to
issue the
show stat
command on the Lotus Notes console or leave the server on
for a period of time.
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Figure 310. LotusNotesPerformanceMonitoring:AddtoChart Requester
If you want to monitor a specific instance that hasn′t showed up yet in the
Performance Monitor, you need to initialize that particular module explicitly.For
example, to initialize the replicator statistics, issue the
rep <servername>
command on the Lotus Notes console.
Figure 311. LotusNotesPerformanceMonitoring:InitializingReplicaStatistics
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5.3.4 What Instances Should You Monitor
The instances to monitor depend on what you will use the information for.There
are four different types of instances, which are shown in the following table:
Some rules of thumb on Lotus Notes Performance Monitoring:

Don′t mix the various types of instances in the same performance chart or
you will have difficulties in reading the graphs.

When displaying Cumulative/Timeunit instances, adjust the update time to
reflect the units of time. For example, don′t update the chart every five
minutes if you have instances that reset every minute or you will loose
information.

Consider having two or more Performance Monitors running at the same
time instead of trying to fit all instances into one chart.
Table 6. MonitoringInstances
Type
Example Instance
Cumul ati ve
Server.Trans.Total
Cumul ati ve/Ti meuni t
Server.Trans.PerMi nute
Instantaneous
Server.Users
Stati c
Server.CPU.Count
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Chapter 6.SMS
This chapter documents how to install and use Microsoft SMS 1.2 and SQL 6.5 on
NT Server 4.0.
6.1 Environment Setup
SMS allows a hierarchical implementation of management servers, which
permits a scalable solution.This management hierarchy is implemented through
SMS sites and domains, and must be planned prior to installation.
After organizing and setting up the initial site plan you will be ready for the
installation of SMS server and clients.Part of that planning will require you to
take care of some system setup items that are a prerequisite to installing SMS.
6.1.1 Site Planning and Design
SMS structures the manager and managed machines in groups called sites and
SMS domains.Sites are groups of SMS domains.SMS domains are groups of
managed machines, either servers or clients, managed as a single entity.A
typical implementation uses sites to group machines geographically, and SMS
domains to group machines with similar characteristics within each site as
shown in Figure 312.
Figure 312. Exampleof DomainswithinaSite
Sites have specific names according to their position and capability in the SMS
hi erarchy:
©
Copyright IBM Corp. 1997
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A primary site is a site that has its own SQL database.It may have other
sites beneath it in the hierarchy.

A secondary site is a site without an SQL database and it is always
dependant upon the primary site.Sites without an SQL database may not
have sites below them in the hierarchy.

A central site is the top site in the site hierarchy and it is always a primary
site.There may be only one central site.

Parent site, child sites, and subsites are also used sometimes to refer to
sites according to their position in the hierarchy.
Figure 313. SiteHierarchyLayout Example
Figure 313 shows an implementation of five sites.The Headquarters Site is in
this case, the central site, the top of the site hierarchy.The Mexico City Plant
Site, NY Office Site and LA Office Site are all secondary sites (no SQL database),
and the Manufacturing Site is a primary site with one subsite.Note that this is
just a sample environment.Depending on implementation considerations, all
sites could be set as primary sites, provided that each had its own SQL Server
database.
Each site has its SMS site server, responsible for executing management
functions and allowing controlled use of the network for inter-site
communi cati ons.
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Communication between sites is handled by SMS services called senders, using
connectivity provided by Windows NT services such as RAS and SNA Server.
Senders provide function much like transmission queue managers.There are
different senders for each type of connection between sites: RAS sender, ISDN
sender and SNA sender.This example used a stand-alone site, so senders will
not be necessary.The following senders exist in SMS Version 1.2:

LAN sender

Batch SNA sender

Inter SNA sender

Async RAS sender

ISDN RAS sender

X.25 RAS sender
Our environment consisted of one domain containing the following systems:

WINNT68 (Windows NT Server 4.0 Domain Controller)

WINNT69 (Windows NT Server V3.51)

WINDOW95 (Windows 95)

SMSMON (Windows NT Workstation)
SMS also supports 16-bit versions of Windows as well as OS/2, NetWare and
Macintosh machines.
Site planning and design was not at all complicated in this case, but should be
considered in large environments.When designing your site layout, keep in
mind that:

SMS assumes that network communications within a site are fast, and that
network communications between sites are slow.Therefore, take into
consideration your physical topology when defining sites.

Primary sites should be used in locations where you have a full-time
systems administrator.Sites to be administered remotely may be secondary
sites, since local queries will be rare.
6.1.2 Prerequisites Setup
You need to check hardware and software prerequisites in the SMS
documentation prior to your installation.Our SMS site server machine was
WINNT68, described in 1.1, “Hardware and Operating System Environment” on
page 1.
Before installing SMS you must:

Have an NTFS partition to install it on

Make sure the Event Viewer is set to hold enough events from applications

Install and customize SQL Server

Create an account to be used by SMS services
If you plan to work with SNMP functions in SMS, remember to install the SNMP
service before installing SMS.We recommend you install SNMP during Windows
NT installation as we had some problems with some of our systems installing
SNMP after the initial installation.
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6.1.2.1 Event Viewer Setup
SMS logs its messages in the System and Application event logs.Select the Log
Settings option under the Log pull-down menu in the Event Viewer to customize
the logs.The following window will appear:
Figure 314. Event LogSetupWindow
Change the Maximum Log Size value to a size proportional to the number of
events you expect to have in the log.We chose 10048 KB, because we will have
SQL Server, SNA Server and SMS Server using the event log together with the
operating system.Select the Overwrite Events as Needed button so applications
will not cause errors writing to the log when the log is full, then click on OK.
Figure 314 shows the settings for the system log.Make sure you change the
settings for the application log and for the error log.Use the list box Change
Settings for to switch between the three logs.The parameters are the same for
all three logs.
The Windows NT Server Resource Kit provides a utility to dump event log
contents into a text file.This utility is called DUMPEL.EXE and it list logs for
local and remote machines.The output of DUMPEL.EXE is a text file with all of
the events.The following command would dump all entries in the application log
generated by the SMS source into the output.txt file:
dumpel -l application -m SMS -f output.txt
Output from dumpel is as follows:
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4/17/97 7:48:06 PM 4 0 186 SMS N/A WINNT68
Information from module: SMS_INVENTORY_DATA_LOADER.
Operation: Validation Object:MIF Object name:SMS RAL
MANAGEMENT RAL00001 MachineName = WINNT68 SiteCode = RAL
Component = SMS_INVENTORY_DATA_LOADER
4/18/97 5:11:19 PM 1 0 323 SMS N/A WINNT68
Fatal Error in module: SMS_SCHEDULER
Operation:Target Creation Object:Job Object name: RAL0001C
Error code:6 MachineName = WINNT68 SiteCode = RAL
Component = SMS_SCHEDULER JobID = RAL0001C
4/21/97 2:00:41 PM 1 0 374 SMS N/A WINNT68
RAL00004 MANAGEMENT NONE MachineName = WINNT68 SiteCode = RAL
Component = SMS_DESPOOLER JobID = RAL00024 JobDestination = RAL
4/25/97 3:05:49 AM 1 0 227 SMS N/A WINNT68
Non-fatal Error in module: SMS_SITE_CONFIG_MANAGER
Operation: Confirmation Object:Server
Object name: MANAGEMENT: WINNT69 Error code:7106
WINNT69 MANAGEMENT Windows NT 3.X 7 MachineName = WINNT68
SiteCode = RAL Component = SMS_SITE_CONFIG_MANAGER


In addition there is an SMS Resource Kit, but we did not use it in this residency.
Information on it can be found at http://www.microsoft.com/smsmgt/reskit.htm.It
is available from Microsoft Press by order number 1-55615-932-3.
6.1.2.2 SQL Server Setup
SQL Server may be installed using integrated security or standard security.
Integrated security allows SQL Server to use NT′s user authentication system,
while the standard security uses SQL Server′s own login validation process.
Both security methods may be used with SMS.
We installed SQL Server using default settings, thereby choosing standard
security and a blank password for the
sa (system administrator) user.
Customize SQL Server in the following ways before installing SMS:
1. Create SQL Server l ogi n IDs for SMS:
We installed our SQL Server with standard security.Therefore, SMS
required SQL login IDs for the installation process and for SMS
administrators to use SMS.These login IDs were used by SQL Server′s own
validation process, and they are not related to Windows NT user IDs.
The SQL login ID used by the installation process requires dbo (database
owner), permission so that all customization in SQL could be performed.
The dbo has full privileges over the database.Figure 315 on page 198
shows the properties for the sa user in the SQL Enterprise Manager.
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Figure 315. SQLManager LoginsWindow
Customization done by the install program includes creating and/or
increasing the size of devices and databases for SMS.We used the default
SQL system administrator user ID sa in our installation process.
2. Make sure the database is l arge enough:
Use the following table to determine what the database device minimum size
should be.The SMS data and log devices will get automatically created by
the install process.
Additional information for large implementations may be found in the
Microsoft Systems Management Server Help files and in the Microsoft
Systems Management Server books online.
Use the SQL Enterprise Manager program to increase the size of devices
and databases.
Table 7. MinimumSizeRecommendationsfor SQLServer Devices
3. Set SQL Server parameters for connecti ons and open objects:
Use the SQL Enterprise Manager to set connections and open object
parameters.Click on the Configure SQL Server button to bring up the Server
Configuration/Options dialog and select the Configuration tab.
Device
Minimum Size
data
10MB
l og
10MB
SMS data
35KB per managed computer
SMS l og
10 percent of SMS data device size
tempdb data
20 percent of SMS data device size
t empdb l og
20 percent of tempdb device size
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Figure 316. ServerConfiguration/OptionsDialog
Scroll down the list and set Open Objects to at least 1000 and User
Connections to at least 30, then click on OK.
4. Tune the system memory configuration for SQL Server.
6.1.2.3 Create Account for SMS Services
The account for SMS should have the following properties:

Part of the administrators local group

Part of the domain admins group

Log on as a service advanced right
We called our account SMSServiceAccount.
6.1.3 SMS Installation
To install SMS, run the _smsetup program from the directory where the SMS
files are located.If you are installing from CD and your environment is set to
auto-run, the installation program will start automatically after the CD is inserted.
The window in Figure 317 on page 200 will be displayed.
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Figure 317. SMSSetupInitial Window
Select Set up SMS 1.2.
Figure 318. SMSSetupWelcomeWindow
Select Continue, then enter your registration information to get to the Installation
Options window (Figure 320 on page 201).
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Figure 319. SMSSetupRegistrationWindow
SMS Setup will search your system for previously installed versions of SMS.If it
finds any version installed, it will just display registration information and go on
to the next screen.
Figure 320. InstallationOptionsinSMSSetup
If no previous installation of SMS was found, the first and second options will be
available; otherwise, the last three options will be available.We did not have
any previous installation of SMS in our machine, so we selected Install a SMS
primary site.
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Figure 321. SMSLicensingWindow
Check the I agree check box if you comply with the licensing instructions to
continue installation.The prerequisites window will be displayed.
Figure 322. SMSPrerequisitesWindow
These prerequisites were taken care of in 6.1.2, “Prerequisites Setup” on
page 195.You can select the Help button to get additional information on this.
Click on Continue.
Figure 323. SMSInstallationDirectorySelectionWindow
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Type in the location of the directory that you would like SMS 1.2 installed in.You
can either accept the default name or choose a new one.After deciding on that,
click on Continue.
Figure 324. SMSComponentsSelectionWindow
The default components shown in Figure 324 are enough for a primary server in
the Intel environment we worked with.If you need to install additional modules
select the Custom button and the window in Figure 325 will be displayed.
Figure 325. SMSList of InstallableAdditional Components
Add the items suitable to your environment to the Software to Install window and
click on OK.
SMS Setup will then prompt you for some SQL parameters.
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Figure 326. SMSSetupSQLDatabaseConfigurationWindow
The default information for this dialog is obtained from your SQL server
installation and customization.
If you chose to let SMS Setup customize SQL automatically, you will need to
enter your SQL Server name, the SQL login ID to be used by SMS Setup (as
explained in 6.1.2.2, “SQL Server Setup” on page 197) and its corresponding
password.Select the Device creation button if you wish to change any of the
default values for SMS SQL devices.
Figure 327. SMSSQLDeviceCreationWindow
If you don′t want SQL to automatically customize and create the SMS databases,
you can do it manually.You can change the database information in the dialog
in Figure 326 to meet your needs.
Select Continue in the window in Figure 326 to continue the installation process.
The Primary Site Configuration Information window will be displayed.Update the
Site Code field with the three letter code you will use to identify this site. This
three letter code will prefix SMS identifiers for every computer managed by SMS.
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Figure 328. SMSPrimarySiteConfigurationInformationWindow
Many SMS functions are performed using logon scripts.That makes logon
servers (domain controllers or backup domain controllers) very important to
SMS domains.The servers that SMS clients use for logon authentication are
called SMS logon servers.SMS automatically detects these logon servers if you
check the Automatically detect all logon servers check box shown in Figure 328.
Enter in the Service Account fields the information about the account created in
6.1.2.3, “Create Account for SMS Services” on page 199 that is to be used by
SMS services.
After you select Continue, the Setup Progress window is shown.
Figure 329. SMSSetupProgressWindow
We chose in Figure 324 on page 203 to install the Network Monitor Agent.SMS
deletes old Network Monitor template information (Figure 330 on page 206) and
instructs us to reinstall it through the Control Panel′s Network setting dialog
shown in Figure 331 on page 206.
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Figure 330. SMSNetworkMonitor DeletionWindow
Figure 331. SMSNetworkMonitor InstallationWindow
The SMS Setup process automatically starts the Control Panel′s Network setting
dialog for Network Monitor Agent installation.The Network Monitor Agent is a
collector of network statistics available in Windows NT.The Network Monitor
Agent collects information to be displayed by Network Monitor Tools (another
network service in Windows NT Server).Select the Services tab and click on
Add.
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Figure 332. Control Panel′sNetworkSettingDialogStartedbySMSSetup
Select the Network Monitor Agent and click OK to install the Network Monitor
Agent.Select OK again to exit the Control Panel′s Network setting dialog but do
not reboot your machine if your SMS Setup is not finished.
Figure 333. NetworkServiceSelectionWindow
After you exit the Network settings dialog, you should see Figure 334 on
page 208 showing successful completion of SMS Setup.
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Figure 334. SMSSetupSuccessful CompletionWindow
The following program group is created by the installation process:
Figure 335. SMSProgramGroupCreatedbytheSetupProgram
Click on the Services icon in the Control Panel to verify the creation and the
status of SMS services, as shown in Figure 336.
Figure 336. SMSServicesCreatedbytheSetupProgram
Note that all services are automatically set to use the account created in 6.1.2.3,
“Create Account for SMS Services” on page 199. Click on Startup after selecting
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one of the SMS services and Figure 337 on page 209 will show the account
under which the service will run.
Figure 337. SMSServiceStartupProperties
SMS Setup creates three shares in the primary server as shown in the following
figure:
Figure 338. SMSSharesCreatedbytheSetupProgram
There were no changes in user accounts or user rights after installation.
After the above steps, install the most recent service pack available from
Microsoft. At the time of this writing, SMS service packs could be obtained from
the Internet at the address http://www.microsoft.com/kb/softlib/.We installed
SMS Server 1.2 Service Pack 1.During the final editing phases of this book,
service pack 2 became available, but we did not update the book for any new
functions or fixes from that service pack.
At this point, that completes the SMS primary server installation.To be able to
manage other machines you must install client code on each machine you want
to manage.
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6.1.4 SMS Clients Installation
SMS 1.2 supports Windows (NT, 95 and 3.x), OS/2 and NetWare machines as
managed resources.Our environment, however, was limited to Windows 95 and
Windows NT.
Before installing clients, synchronize the client clock with the server clock with
the command:
net time \\servername /set
Change servername to the server you want the client clock synchronized with.
This assures you that jobs will be carried out at the correct time.
SMS clients may be installed manually or automatically.
6.1.4.1 Manual SMS Client Installation
To install clients manually, simply go to the target machine, map the SMS
shared directory SMS_SHR as a local drive and from it run the RUNSMS.BAT
script.
RUNSMS.BAT issues simple shell commands to verify what operating system it
is running on and starts the correct SMS client install program.The script ran
fine in our installation, and did not require any modification.The sample SMS
scripts are listed in Appendix A, “SMS Files” on page 271.
No special requirements other than the ones listed in the Appendix B of the
Microsoft SMS Getting Started manual were necessary.It is interesting to note,
however, that only Windows machines have all of the SMS functions.Any other
non-Microsoft platform (DOS, OS/2 and Macintosh) can only use the inventory
and software distribution.
We installed our SMS client on Windows NT Server V3.51 manually.Figure 339
shows the installation output.
Figure 339. Output fromSMSClient Manual Installation
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6.1.4.2 Automatic SMS Client Installation
The process regarded by Microsoft as automatic installation is actually the
execution of the install procedure from a logon script.Logon scripts are
programs or batch files executed automatically when a user logs on to a server.
That means, for example, that if nobody ever logs on to a remote Windows NT
Server, automatic installation is impossible.This is still a handy alternative
when SMS clients must be deployed in large environments.
Therefore we had to enable logon scripts and their related services in our
environment to allow automatic SMS client installation to occur.
You need to follow three steps to enable automatic client installation:
1. Configure the Wi ndows NT di rectory repl i cator servi ce.
The replicator service will allow SMS files and scripts to be shared
(replicated) between domain controllers in your environment, thus making
these files and scripts available to all clients at login time.
Enable NT′s directory replicator service with the following steps:
a.Create an account to be used by the directory replicator service with the
following characteristics:administrator privileges, user cannot change
password, password never expires and log on as a service advanced
right.
Set the directory replicator service to use that account through the
Services icon in the Control Panel.
b.Give read access to the domain user group to the NETLOGON share in
each logon server.
c. Enable repl i cati on usi ng the Wi ndows NT Server Manager program,wi th
the following steps:
1) Select the server you want to enable replication in.
2) Select Properties under the Computer pull-down menu.You will see
the following window:
Figure 340. NTServer PropertiesWindow
Click on the Replication button, and the Directory Replication window
will appear:
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Figure 341. NTDirectoryReplicationPropertiesWindow
Select Export Directories and Import Directories.Make sure that To
List and From List are empty, and close all open windows by clicking
on the OK button.
You may test your directory replication by copying a small sample
file to the \winnt\system32\repl\export\scripts directory (where winnt
is your windows system directory).If everything is working fine, the
directory replicator service will copy this file automatically to the
\wi nnt\system32\repl\i mport\scri pts di rectory.
Note
The copying is not instantaneous.
2. Set domai ns to use the Al l detected servers option.
Click on the Domains button in the Site Properties window of the SMS
Administrator program (refer to 6.2.1, “The SMS Administrator” on page 217
for information on how to start the SMS Administrator program) to set the
Use All Detected Servers option.
Figure 342. SMSDomainsWindow
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Choose Proposed Properties and then Properties....Figure 343 on page 213
will be displayed.
Figure 343. SMSDomainPropertiesWindow
Note that your primary site server will be automatically added to the Use
These Logon Servers window.
Select Use All Detected Servers and select OK.Click on OK again and the
proposed properties will be saved and applied by the SMS services
according to their schedule.
This makes SMS discover other logon servers to replicate its logon scripts,
assuring that all user logins will execute the SMS client install program.
3. Enable Automatically Configure Workstation Logon Scripts.
Click on the Clients button in the Site Properties window of the SMS
Administrator program (please refer to 6.2.1, “The SMS Administrator” on
page 217 for information on how to start the SMS Administrator program) to
enable the Automatically Configure Workstation Logon Scripts option.
Figure 344. SMSClientsPropertiesWindow
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Select Proposed Properties and check the Automatically Configure
Workstation Logon Scripts option.This will cause SMS to update existing
logon scripts to include the SMSLS.BAT script.If any of the users don′t have
a logon script SMS will make SMSLS.BAT the users logon script.If a user′s
logon script is a binary file instead of a .BAT file, SMS will
not update it.In
that case, before enabling automatic client installation, create a logon script
that calls the binary file.When you enable SMS automatic client installation,
it will successfully add SMSLS.BAT to the logon script.SMSLS.BAT is listed
in Appendix A, “SMS Files” on page 271.
Select OK to submit changes to SMS services.
These are the steps needed to make SMS automatic client installation available.
From now on, when a user logs on, SMS will check for installed client code. If
the client code has not been installed, the installation process runs automatically
on the machine.
Note on Timing
SMS and NT′s Directory Replicator service both take some time to perform
synchronization among its services. Be aware that your automatic installation
environment might even take a few hours to be 100% complete.Check the
Events window in SMS Administrator (described in 6.2.5, “Events and Alerts”
on page 245) for any errors that might occur during this process.
We created our SMS service account belonging to the administrator group
only, as described in SMS documentation.The fact that the SMS service
account was not part of the domain admin group did not allow the login
scripts for automatic installation to be copied to the shared directories,
causing a long delay.
We only found out about the problem when we checked the SMS Events
wi ndow.The entry in Figure 345 documented the error.We then added the
SMS service account to the domain admins group and the automatic client
install process worked fine.
Figure 345. SMSEvent DescribingInsufficient Privileges
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6.1.4.3 SMS Client Modules
The client installation process starts the Package Command Manager
(Figure 346), the MIF Entry program (Figure 347 on page 216) and creates an
SMS client program group (Figure 348 on page 216 and Figure 349 on
page 217).
Figure 346. SMSPackageCommandManager
The Package Command Manager (PCM) is part of the SMS software distribution
function.It is the client portion that is in charge of executing jobs sent by SMS.
PCM is loaded in the client machine, and it waits for the arrival of a job.When a
job arrives, it pops up a window.If the job is not mandatory, it will sit in PCM
until it expires or until the user executes it.If it is mandatory, PCM will show a
message (Figure 376 on page 234) and execute it after five minutes.
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Figure 347. SMSMIFEntryProgram
The MIF Entry program complements the inventory service provided by SMS by
allowing the creation of forms with new inventory fields.These forms use the
DMTF MIF standard format.We discuss inventory extensions in more detail in
6.2.6, “Performing Inventory” on page 253.
Figure 348. SMSClient ProgramGroupinWindowsNT3.51
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Figure 349. SMSClient ProgramGroupinWindows95
In addition to the Package Command Manager and the MIF Entry program, two
other modules are installed in the client machine and included in the SMS client
program group: Program Group Control and Help Desk Options.
The Program Group Control is the client module responsible for making shared
network applications available.
Help Desk Options allows the user in the managed machine to customize how
SMS remote troubleshooting will work.This customization applies to allowing or
denying the SMS administrator from executing each remote troubleshooting
function.The remote troubleshooting option is discussed in 6.2.8, “Performing
Remote Troubleshooting” on page 262.
Windows 3.x and Windows 95 machines have an additional icon in the SMS client
program group for the remote control client (WUSER.EXE and WUSER32.EXE).
This module is started as a service in Windows NT, therefore, it only appears
within the services program in the control panel.
The above steps complete the basic SMS client installation.As clients are
installed, the inventory function is run.Check in the SMS Administrator window
(see 6.2.1, “The SMS Administrator”) if the client was registered and if its
inventory information was actually collected.If yes, communication between
SMS and the client is fine.Note that remote control (Help Desk icon) is disabled
by default.(See 6.2.8, “Performing Remote Troubleshooting” on page 262 for
how to enable it.)
6.2 Working with SMS
SMS functions are available through the SMS Administrator GUI.This program
is installed in primary sites by default, but may also be installed in any Windows
NT machine that communicates with the primary site.
6.2.1 The SMS Administrator
After installation, the SMS program group in your administrator machine should
look like this:
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Figure 350. SMSAdministrator ProgramGroup
Select the SMS Administrator item to start the SMS GUI.You will be prompted
for your SMS SQL password.This password will be the same one you used to
install SMS.
Figure 351. SMSAdministrator LoginWindow
The open SMS window will appear allowing you to choose which window type to
start SMS with.At this time, select Sites as your window type and then click on
OK.
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Figure 352. OpenSMSWindow
The administrator window is displayed.The tool bar under the pull-down menus
contains buttons for each type of window you can open:

Sites

Jobs

Packages

Queri es

Al erts

Machi ne Groups

Site Groups

Program Groups

Events

SNMP Traps
If you position the mouse pointer over the buttons for a moment, a help box will
indicate what the button is used for.We provide a description of each of these
buttons as we explain each function of SMS.For now, you will have the sites
window displayed.This window shows how your site hierarchy is laid out. We
double-clicked on the site icon named Raleigh ITSO, and then on the domain
i con Management.You will see in the right side of the sites window the list of
clients belonging to this domain.
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Figure 353. SMSSitesWindow
Select the Raleigh ITSO site and click on the Properties button (or choose
Properties from the file pull-down menu). The window in Figure 354 appears.
Figure 354. SMSSitePropertiesWindow
This window shows the site properties and allows you to change settings for
each specific service for this site.You may customize how often inventory is
carried out, which SMS services are available in client machines, where SMS
Server services will run, position in hierarchy, as well as other functions.We list
all of the parameters, but we focus on the ones that are most meaningful to our
scenarios.Refer to the bibliography for details on parameters not documented
here.
Each property window will have two property views: Current Properties and
Proposed Properties.When you enter a property window the Current Properties
option is always the default.
Current Properties shows the options SMS is using at that moment.Proposed
Properties allows you to modify Current Properties and then submit your
changes to SMS.
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The SMS Hierarchy Manager will detect modifications in the database and
execute these changes using a system job.
Figure 355. SMSInventoryPropertiesWindow
The Inventory Properties window is shown after you select the Inventory button
in the Site Properties window.This window allows customization of how
frequent hardware and software inventory will run on client machines, as well as
how to handle inventory when the network is slow.
The shortest time interval to perform inventory is the time between consecutive
logons to the network by the client.For example, if the client logs on at 12:00
then logs right off and logs back on at 12:01, the time interval will be one minute.
This is an inefficent way to perform the inventory process, but it is the way SMS
is implemented.If logons are too frequent, this interval may be increased by the
number of days you find adequate.
Click on the Clients button in Figure 350 on page 218 and the following window
is displayed:
Figure 356. SMSClient PropertiesWindow
Use the Client Properties window to set:
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Which SMS component will be available at the client machines in this site.
You may select under Client Software which modules will be available in the
client machine, and if each one of them will be automatically started or not.

Remote Troubleshooting options
Also under Client Software are options for Remote Troubleshooting on
Windows NT managed machines, available by clicking on the Options button.
Figure 357. SMSClient RemoteTroubleshootingPropertiesWindow
Use the first section of the above window to restrict access to the remote
troubleshooting option to specific groups or users.All administrator groups
have access to this function by default.
SMS provides improved remote troubleshooting performance for the default list
of video drivers in Windows NT.Use the Install Accelerated Screen Transfer
section to disable this function or to disable acceleration with one specific video
dri ver.
In the last section of Figure 357, select which protocol you would like to use for
remote control of your Windows NT managed machines.

Automatic configuration of logon scripts
This option in Figure 356 on page 221 will determine whether or not to
enable automatic installation of SMS clients, as shown in 6.1.4.2, “Automatic
SMS Client Installation” on page 211.

Polling interval for the Package Command Manager
Specify in this field how many minutes the Package Command Manager
(6.2.7, “Performing Software Distribution” on page 260) should wait between
each round of polls from the server to search for new available packages.
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SMS allows you to distribute each server function among different NT servers,
called SMS Helper servers.Click the Services button in Figure 354 on page 220
to customize which server will execute which function, as shown below.
Figure 358. SMSServicesPropertiesWindow
Type the server name for each service in the appropriate field, and the
corresponding drive where the SMS code is located in that server.Note that it
must be an NTFS drive.
The Sender service is not listed in this window, but may also be started on a
different machine.Click on the Senders button in Figure 354 on page 220 to
customize senders.
Use the Services Properties window to set how much system load SMS services
should use.In the Response section select the kind of response time you expect
from SMS.An example of the system load being proportional to the requested
response time is shown in the right-hand column.
Click on the Account button in Figure 354 on page 220 if you need to change
some of the SMS service account parameters.Examples of that would be the
account name or the password.This refers to the account created in 6.1.2.3,
“Create Account for SMS Services” on page 199.
Figure 359. SMSAccount PropertiesWindow
Use the Parent Site window to set the role of this server in the SMS hierarchy.
In our case, the server is a stand-alone server.However, if you are a child site
of any other site, select Attach to Parent Site and input the Site Code in the
proper field in Figure 360 on page 224.
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The site code of the parent site was chosen during the installation process as
shown in Figure 328 on page 205.
Figure 360. SMSParent SitePropertiesWindow
The Domains window allows you to configure which domains are located under
the selected site.Click on the Domains button in the Site Properties window
(Figure 354 on page 220) to open the Domains window.
Figure 361. SMSDomainsWindowfor aSite
Figure 361 lists the domains currently under this site.You may add other
domains or change domain properties by clicking on the Add and Properties
buttons respectively.
In both cases you will be prompted with the window in Figure 362 on page 225.
For each domain you may manually specify which machines are logon servers or
leave it up to SMS to discover them.Select Use All Detected Servers to let SMS
discover logon servers, or Use Specified Servers to manually input logon servers
for your domain.
Note that Use All Detected Servers must be set to enable automatic client
installation for SMS (see 6.1.4.2, “Automatic SMS Client Installation” on
page 211).
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Figure 362. SMSDomainPropertiesWindowfor EachDomain
The following window allows you to register additional package servers to your
site.Package servers are sources or intermediate repositories for packages
distributed by SMS.
Figure 363. SMSServer PropertiesWindow
The Addresses, Outboxes and Senders buttons in Figure 354 on page 220 refer
to parameters used generally in multi-site implementations:

Addresses parameters allow configuration of addresses to be used by
senders for communication between sites.

Outboxes parameters determine which outboxes are available in this site.
Outboxes are directories used by each sender as an intermediary repository
of transmission requests.

Senders parameters register all senders within a site.
Click on the SNMP Traps button in Figure 354 on page 220 to customize the
SMS SNMP-related settings.
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We cover SNMP settings in 6.2.5.1, “SNMP Functions in SMS” on page 247.
6.2.2 Packages and Jobs
All software that is to be managed by SMS must be defined in packages.
Packages contain parameters for SMS to perform software distribution,
application sharing and software inventory.A package is much like a CID install,
where you have installation parameters gathered for automation.
A
job in SMS is a task that carries out actions contained in packages.Jobs may
distribute or remove software and share applications.
A job always takes actions based upon what is specified in a package, and a
package is always handled by a job. Therefore, the two are very closely related.
6.2.2.1 Packages
Use the Packages window in the SMS Administrator GUI to define new packages.
Figure 364. SMSPackagesWindow
Packages may be used in three ways:
1. Defining files and commands to be di stri buted to cl i ent machi nes.
2. Defining appl i cati ons to be di stri buted to servers and shared wi th cl i ent
machi nes.
3. Defining parameters for SMS to recogni ze a package duri ng software
inventory.
To create a new package, click on the New Package button in the tool bar or
choose File then New from the pull-down menus.
Figure 365. SMSPackagePropertiesWindow
Enter the name and a comment and click on Workstations to enter distribution
properties for this package.
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Figure 366. SMSSetupPackagefor WorkstationsWindow
The Source Directory field must contain the directory where the files you want to
distribute are.It must also be a shared directory in order to be accessed by
SMS services (local or remote).Click on New to specify the installation
command.
Figure 367. SMSCommandLinePropertiesWindow
The installation command will be executed on the target machine when the
package distribution job is carried out.The executable file for the installation
command must be in the source directory together with the files to be
transferred.
Select OK to exit the screens and the following warning will be displayed to
remind you of sharing the source directory.
Figure 368. WarningonSharingDirectoriesAcrossSystems
The Sharing button in the Package Properties window will allow you to enter
information on software sharing.
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Figure 369. SMSSetupPackagefor SharingWindow
In the Source Directory field, enter the directory where the shared application
files are.These files will be packaged and distributed to the servers that will be
sharing this application with client machines.This application will be shared
under the share name specified in the Share Name field.
You can specify several program items for each shared application.Each
program item will be one icon in the client′s program group.Click on New to
specify new program items.
Figure 370. SMSProgramItemPropertiesWindow
Specify the following characteristics for each icon:

Description: Icon label

Command Line:Program to be executed when the icon is clicked on

Registry Name:Registry name of the application, if the application is to be
called by its registry name instead of its program name
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Configuration Command Line:Any configuration program to be run by the
program group manager to set up the shared application in the client
machi ne

Whether or not to display the icon in the program group

Whether or not to run the application minimized

Run Local Copy if Present: Will make SMS look for copies of the application
on local drives and execute local copies if they exist

Drive Mode: Determines if the application will run directly from its share
name (UNC name) without being mounted to a drive, or if it will need to be
mounted to any drive or a specific drive

Supported platforms for this application
Click on OK to close the sharing screens to finish sharing parameters setup.
Click on the Inventory button in the Package Properties window to define how
SMS will discover this software during inventory.This is done by specifying a
set of characteristics that imply that the software is installed in a machine.
Characteristics must always be file-related.For example, the simple fact that
one file exists in a workstation may show that an application is installed.On the
other hand, it might be necessary to distinguish different versions of the same
software.In this case, you may specify file names and file sizes to find out what
version is installed.
Figure 371. SMSSetupPackagefor InventoryWindow
Use the Add AND and Add OR buttons to define these parameters.You may
specify date or checksum.There are other attributes to compare on as well.If
you do not know the value for one attribute, the Retrieve function will obtain the
correct value for you.
After selecting OK, SMS will warn you the changes are underway.
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This package will now be part of the inventory criteria for software, and will
show up with remaining inventory data (see 6.2.6, “Performing Inventory” on
page 253).
Packages may also be created with package definition files (PDFs).PDFs are
text files that contain package parameters to be input automatically when
creating a package.SMS provides many PDFs for Microsoft products in the
\SMS\PRIMSITE.SRV\IMPORT.SRC\ENU directory.PDF files have a .PDF
extension.A sample PDF file for Microsoft Office 95 follows:
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[PDF]
Version=1.0
[Package Definition]
Product=Microsoft Office 95 Professional
Version=7.0a
Comment=Microsoft Office 95 Pro
SetupVariations=Compact, Typical, Complete, Custom, Uninstall
[Compact Setup]
CommandLine=setup.exe /Q1 /B2
CommandName=Compact
UserInputRequired=FALSE
SupportedPlatforms=Windows95, Windows NT 3.1 (x86)
[Typical Setup]
CommandLine=setup.exe /Q1 /B1
CommandName=Typical
UserInputRequired=FALSE
SupportedPlatforms=Windows95, Windows NT 3.1 (x86)
[Complete Setup]
CommandLine=setup.exe /Q1 /B3
CommandName=Complete
UserInputRequired=FALSE
SupportedPlatforms=Windows95, Windows NT 3.1 (x86)
[Custom Setup]
CommandLine=setup.exe
CommandName=Custom
UserInputRequired=TRUE
SupportedPlatforms=Windows95, Windows NT 3.1 (x86)
[Uninstall Setup]
CommandLine=setup.exe /Q1 /U
CommandName=Uninstall
UserInputRequired=TRUE
SupportedPlatforms=Windows95, Windows NT 3.1 (x86)
[Setup Package for Sharing]
ShareName=ofp95ash
ShareAccess=UserRead, UserWrite, GuestRead, GuestWrite
[Program Item Properties 1]
CommandLine=msoffice.exe
Description=Microsoft Office95a Pro Install
ConfigurationScript=smsacm32.exe ofp95a+install setup.stf ″SETUP.EXE /B4 /Q1″ ″SETUP.EXE /U /Q1″
RegistryName=ofp95a+install
DefaultINIFile=
RunMinimized=FALSE
RunLocalCopyIfPresent=FALSE
DriveMode=UNC
SupportedPlatforms=Windows95
SetupIcon=OFP95A01.ICO
DisplayIconInProgGroup=TRUE
[Setup Package for Inventory]
InventoryThisPackage=TRUE
Detection Rule Part 1=File 1
;Detection Rule Part 2=AND
;Detection Rule Part 3=File 2
[File 1]
FILE=MSOFFICE.EXE
COLLECT=FALSE
Checksum=
DATE=1, 31, 96
SIZE=365056
TIME=00, 00
Figure 372. SamplePDFFilefor Microsoft Office95
Each section in the PDF corresponds to the windows for manual creation of the
package.The Package Definition section corresponds to input in the Package
Properties window (Figure 365 on page 226). The Manual Setup and Automated
Setup sections correspond to the workstation command lines contained in the
Setup Package for Workstations window (Figure 366 on page 227).Setup
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Package for Inventory section and the File 1 section correspond to parameters in
the Setup Package for Inventory window (Figure 371 on page 229).
To create a package from a PDF, click on the Import button in the Package
Properties window (Figure 365 on page 226).The only parameter required to be
input manually will be the source directory (Figure 366 on page 227).
After defining your packages, you are ready to use jobs to distribute and execute
them in client workstations.
6.2.2.2 Jobs
Use the Jobs window in the SMS Administrator GUI to work with jobs.
Figure 373. SMSJobsWindow
Note that in Figure 373 there are different types of jobs: System jobs, Run
Command jobs, Remove Package jobs, and Share Package jobs.SMS itself
uses jobs to carry out its tasks.SMS jobs are called System Jobs.Jobs created
by the administrator may be Run Command jobs, Share Package jobs or
Remove Package jobs.
A Run Command on Workstation job distributes a package with a command to
be executed on a workstation.The package must contain a command and may
also contain software or data files.
A Share Package job distributes a package to servers for application sharing.
A Remove Package job removes packages from distribution servers.This type
of job deletes package source directory files in the specified distribution servers.
Regular job processing includes the Send, Distribute and Run phases.The Send
phase transmits the package to all target sites.The Distribute phase places the
package in the distribution servers.The Run phase executes the packages in
the target client workstations.Run Command on Workstation jobs have all three
phases.A Share Package job has only the Send and the Distribute phases,
since it does not involve client workstations directly.Remove Package jobs do
not have any phases.
A job is automatically created if you drag a package onto a target such as a
machine (in the Sites window), a domain or a group.You will be prompted to
enter job parameters as if you were creating the job manually.
Click on New to manually create a new job under the Jobs window.
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Figure 374. SMSJobPropertiesWindow
For a Run Command on Workstation job, type a job description in the Comment
field and choose the appropriate job type.Then click on Details to input the job
details.
Figure 375. SMSJobDetailsWindow
Specify in the first field of the job details window what package will be handled
by this job.The Package field will contain all packages defined with workstation
attributes (the only ones that apply to the Run on Workstation job type).
Job Target, listed below the Package field, allows you to set target workstations
where the job will be executed.You may use the results of a query as targets,
as well as machine groups, machine paths, and site/subsite boundaries.
Send Phase options will determine if SMS actually sends a new copy of the
package to the distribution servers and clients or if it uses the current copy
already available in each machine.Select Even if Previously Sent to force
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package distribution.The Only if Not Previously sent option will use the package
currently available at the target sites.
Use the parameters in the Distribution Phase section to limit the scope of target
distribution servers that will receive this package.Refresh Existing Distribution
Servers will cause SMS to send the package to all servers that already have a
copy of the package, while the other option allows you to specify machines or
groups of machines (distribution servers) to receive the package.
Packages may contain different commands for different actions on package files
(for example, standard installation or minimum installation).Select which
command you want to be executed in the Run Phase section of the Job Details
wi ndow.Also specify when this job should be offered to the client workstation.
After that specific period of time, the job will show up in the Package Command
Manager in the client workstation.Note that this is different than scheduling the
job for a specified time.Scheduling is available by clicking on the Schedule
button in the Job Properties window.
It is possible to make jobs mandatory, to force the Package Command Manager
to run them after the specified date and time.Check the Mandatory After box to
select that option, and clients will be prompted with the following window when
the job is received by Package Command Manager.
Figure 376. SMSMandatoryJobExecutionWarning
Jobs may have an expiration date that will prevent them from being executed
after a specified date and time (by deleting them from Package Command
Manager in the client workstation).The expiration date is enabled by checking
the Expires After check box.
Scheduling parameters, as mentioned above, may be set by clicking the
Schedule button in the Job Properties window.
Figure 377. SMSJobScheduleWindow
A job may be scheduled for a specified date and time, with priority and
frequency (repeat) options.Selecting OK to close the windows will finish job
creation and trigger an update in the database.
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SMS will distribute and execute the jobs accordingly and show their status in the
Job Status window.
Figure 378. SMSJobStatusWindow
Figure 378 shows a summary of the status for this job on a per site basis.You
may select one specific site and click Details for detailed status information.
Figure 379. SMSJobStatusDetailsWindow
Details on job status cover date, time and outcome of job arrival to the site.In
addition, you can get status details on server processing for the job
(distribution), and the status of execution on each target workstation.
If a job fails, it will generate an event documenting the error.Check the Event
window for job events.Double-click on an event to see event details.
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Figure 380. Event Details
6.2.3 Queries and Reports
A lot of the functional advantages in SMS are obtained not from new code or
solutions, but from the fact that it uses an SQL database to store its data.It is
difficult to visualize a good inventory management solution that does not build its
data on a flexible and open database.SMS does a good job in storing its
information in SQL Server, allowing other applications to make use of it, and
providing internal querying and customized output capabilities.
Queries allow the administrator to select entries in the SMS database according
to pre-specified criteria.To better understand queries in SMS, we must
understand part of the structure of the SMS database.
Objects in the SMS database are stored according to their
architecture.An
architecture specifies a set of characteristics (attributes) defining object types.
The Personal Computer architecture, for example, structures characteristics of
computers supported by SMS.Architectures in the SMS database are:

Personal Computer

UserGroups

JobDetails

SMS Event

SNMP Traps

PackageLocation
Smaller sets of attributes form
groups.Error and information could be examples
of groups in the SMS event architecture.
The Queries icon in the SMS Administrator window opens the Queries window.
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Figure 381. SMSQueriesWindow
Select from the pull-down menus File, then New, to create a new query.
Figure 382. SMSQueryPropertiesWindow
The Query Properties window is basically a way to graphically create queries.
That is, you create a text expression specifying your criteria without typing, just
by pointing and clicking.
Queries may be run on one architecture at a time.Use the proper fields to
name and describe your query, and select the architecture you want to run it on.
Our example selects all error events from the database, so we selected the SMS
Error architecture.
The column of buttons to the right side of the window allows you to enter your
criteria.Click on the Add AND button and the Query Expression Properties
window will show you a table with groups, classes and attributes that may be
used in your query.You may combine any of these attributes in any way with
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SQL operators to specify your selection criteria.For our example, we will select
the EventType attribute, the is operator, and the \Microsoft\SMS\Error value.
Figure 383. SMSQueryExpressionPropertiesWindow
After selecting OK, your selections will be converted to text and inserted into the
Find all ′SMSEvent′ items where:section of the Query Properties window.
Figure 384. SMSQueryPropertiesWindow
Our sample query is ready to be run.It is possible to add other selection
criteria, using the Add AND and Add OR buttons, and to group them in
parenthesis to override the default resolution order.
SMS has a number of preset queries available.A subset of the preset queries is
listed in Figure 381 on page 237.One example of a query with more than one
selection criteria is the Inactive Personal Computers query.
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Figure 385. InactivePersonal ComputersQuery
To execute a query, select the desired item from the Query window and click on
the Execute Query button.
Figure 386. SMSExecuteQueryWindow
Under the Execute Query window you may change the query to be executed,
choose its output format, and the database scope for this query (site wise).We
used the default query result format for this example.Click on OK to run the
query.
Figure 387. SMSQueryResultsWindow
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Figure 387 is displayed with the results of the query.
SMS internal reporting capabilities are limited to customizing query output
format and printing query output.Because of that, an additional reporting tool
called Crystal Reports from Crystal Computer Services, Inc. is packaged together
with SMS.
Select Define Query Result Formats from the File menu to customize query
output.
Figure 388. SMSDefineQueryResult FormatsWindow
Each query output format must be associated with an architecture.It is possible
to have more than one output format based on each architecture.SMS provides
one default format, the Identification format, for each architecture.
The Identification format formats query output to show basic information such as
machine name, SMSID, site, domain, system role and type, and last user logged
on.All queries you execute before specifying an output format will have results
shown in the Identification format.
In our example, we created output for the selected error events that included all
of the text data in the message.To duplicate this choose the SMSEvent
architecture and click on New to create the new output format.
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Figure 389. SMSDefineQueryResult Format PropertiesWindow
Move the desired attributes from the Available Columns list to the Format list of
the window to compose your new output format.Click on OK to close the
windows and the new output format will be available when you run queries on
the specified architecture.
Remember that all output may be printed or copied to a file by clicking on the
Print option in the File pull-down menu.
6.2.4 SMS Groups
Two different categories of groups are listed here as examples: program groups
and site/machine groups.
6.2.4.1 Program Groups
A program group is basically a collection of program items.After applications
are shared (see 6.2.2, “Packages and Jobs” on page 226), application program
items are made available to the users.These program items can only be
accessed with the program groups.
Program groups may be customized to show only specific icons and access to
them may be restricted by user groups.Create one program group by clicking
on the New button in the Program Groups window.
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Figure 390. SMSProgramGroupPropertiesWindow
Type a name with some comments and select the Packages button to specify
which sharing packages will be used in this program group.
Figure 391. SMSProgramGroupPackagesWindow
All available packages with sharing properties will be listed in the right portion
of the window.Select the ones you will use in the program group by moving
them to the left portion of the window.
Each member package selected will have its program items listed in the Shared
Program section of the Program Group Packages window.The default setting is
to select all program items, but you may select/deselect according to your
needs.After you click on OK, you will see in the Program Group Properties
window the icons for each program item selected to be part of this program
group.
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Figure 392. SMSProgramGroupPropertiesWindow
Click on User Groups to define which user groups will have access to this
program group.
Figure 393. SMSProgramGroupUser GroupsWindow
Click on OK to finish the program group creation process.Program groups
apply only to program items and user access.Packages associated with
program groups are not distributed automatically when program groups are
distributed.SMS issues the warning below to remind you that any related
packages must be distributed by you.
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Figure 394. SMSProgramGroupWarning
SMS will create an internal job to update this program group at all sites.
6.2.4.2 Site Groups and Machine Groups
Site groups and machine groups are yet another way for the administrator to
group machines.Queries group machines with similar criteria.Groups provide
the administrator with the freedom to set up any kind of arrangement they need,
based upon their own criteria.
Open the Site Groups window and create a new group.After selecting this
group simply drag and drop into it any sites you want from the Sites window.
Perform the same procedure for machine groups, selecting managed machines
instead of sites.The figure below illustrates the Sites window together with the
Site Groups window and the Machine Groups window.
Figure 395. SMSGroups
Machine groups and site groups may be used as targets in drag-and-drop
operations or, as for example, in Figure 375 on page 233 in the Job Target
fields.
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6.2.5 Events and Alerts
Relevant occurrences within SMS are logged to the database as events.Al l
events may be viewed through the Event window in the SMS Administrator GUI.
Events are logged also in the Windows NT Event Viewer, under the SMS source.
Alerts also document relevant occurrences, but differ from events because they
are the result of a query in the SMS database.Events are a result of SMS
actions, while alerts flow as a result of conditions that were pre-determined by
how the administrator customized the system.
The administrator may query any condition in the SMS database, and if that
condition is met, an alert will be generated.For each alert, you may specify an
action to be automatically executed.
Note that the way alerts are structured does not allow real-time responses to
conditions.Any condition must first be detected by SMS, then written to the
database, then be detected by the alert query to trigger an action.The more
dynamic the information you want to monitor, the more difficult it is to respond to
it promptly with SMS.
Since an alert is always the result of a query you must obviously perform the
query before any alert will flow.We created a query to select all machines with
less than 400 MB of free disk space on drive C:.
Figure 396. QueryPropertiestoGenerateAlert
Use the Alerts window to create new alerts.After selecting New, Name and
Comment, the alert will be created.
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Figure 397. SMSAlert PropertiesWindow
The Query button allows you to specify which query will be associated with this
alert.Select the one we just created.
Figure 398. SMSAlert QueryWindow
The query will be executed by SMS based upon the time interval you specify in
Figure 398.Every time the query is executed, an alert will be generated if the
number of hits match the condition and value in the Generate Alert fields.
However, if the number of hits is the same as the previous query executed by
the alerter service, an alert will not be generated.
Figure 399. SMSAlert ActionsWindow
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Use the Actions button in the Alert Properties window to specify actions to be
performed when an alert is generated.You may log an event, run a command
line program or notify a computer or user.
The specified command will run in the same machine where the SMS alerter
service is running, under the SMS service account.This command may not be a
windows application, but you may redirect command output to a specified file as
we did in the above example.The diruse command in the above syntax lists all
directories with more than 20 MB and redirects its output to the file analysys.txt.
The following event was generated from our alert:
Figure 400. SMSEvent ResultingfromAlert
Users selected to be notified receive a messenger service window.
Figure 401. SMSAlert Message
6.2.5.1 SNMP Functions in SMS
SMS is able to interact with SNMP in two ways, by listening to SNMP traps or
generating SNMP traps from Windows NT events.
Listening to SNMP Traps:To set up SMS to listen to SNMP traps, go to the
Sites window in the SMS Administrator and after selecting the desired site, click
on the Properties button.The Site Properties window will be displayed
(Figure 354 on page 220).Click on the SNMP Traps button for the SNMP Traps
Properties window.
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Figure 402. SMSSNMPTrapsPropertiesWindow
This window allows the administration to set up how traps will be handled by
SMS.Traps may be either filtered (ignored) or logged to the database.You may
create handling options for each trap or group of traps, using the SNMP Trap
Filter Properties window.Click on the Create button to create a trap filter.
Figure 403. SMSSNMPTrapFilter PropertiesWindow
We created a filter to log all traps to the database.The window in Figure 403
allows you to restrict actions on traps based on:

IP address

Trap enterprise ID

NT event source (for traps that correspond to NT events)

Trap type
Select the desired options and click on the OK button to close the windows,
clicking on Yes when SMS prompts you for confirmation on site update.You will
now see traps in the SMS SNMP Traps window.
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Figure 404. SMSSNMPTrapsWindow
Double-click on a trap to see trap details.
Figure 405. TrapsDetails
Traps listed in the SMS SNMP Traps window are part of the SMS database.
Therefore, you may base new queries on trap parameters, and also create new
alerts or automated actions for SMS to perform when a specific trap or group of
traps occur.Queries are described in 6.2.3, “Queries and Reports” on page 236.
Refer to 6.2.5, “Events and Alerts” on page 245 for information on alerts and
automated actions.
Keep in mind, however, that because SMS has query-based alerts you will not
be able to respond to traps in real time.Responding to traps in real time is
better performed by dedicated SNMP managers such as TME 10 NetView or
OpenView.
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Generating SNMP Traps from Windows NT Events:All events logged to the
Windows NT Event Viewer may be translated to SNMP traps.This allows events
to be integrated into SNMP management platforms such as TME 10 NetView,
TME Event Console or OpenView.
Use the Event to Trap Translator function in SMS to generate traps from NT
events.Find the computer you want to work on in the Sites window and
double-click on it.This will bring you to the Personal Computer Properties
wi ndow.Select the Windows NT Diagnostics icon in the left column, and you will
see the Event to Trap Translator icon available in the same window.
Figure 406. WinNTAdministrativeTools,Event toTrapTranslator
Click on the Event to Trap Translator button and a progress indicator window is
shown.Since you are getting remote parameters over the network, it may take
a few seconds to load.
Figure 407. LoadingTrapConfigurationWindow
The Event to Trap Translator window is displayed.Click on the Edit button to
expand the window and add events to be translated into traps.
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Figure 408. Event toTrapTranslator Window
The lower part of the window lists the available event sources from the Event
Viewer grouped by the event log type.We chose a couple of events from the
SNMP source under the system log.Double-click on the selected event and the
event properties window is displayed.
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Figure 409. Event Properties
The Properties window allows you to create a trap throttle (threshold) to
generate traps only when events reach a pre-specified count within a specific
time interval.For example, you may want to only generate a trap for
unsuccessful logon events if you detect more then three unsuccessful logon
attempts in 60 seconds.This way the If Event Count Reaches field must be set
to 3 and the Within Time Interval check box must be checked with its
corresponding seconds field set to 60.
Clicking on OK will add this event to the list in the top half of the window.Every
time this type of event is generated, SMS will check it against the event
properties (see Figure 409) and issue a corresponding SNMP trap if appropriate.
The Settings button in the Event to Trap Translator window allows you to change
trap translation parameters.
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Figure 410. Event toTrapTranslator Settings
The field Trap Length Limit allows you to restrict how large translated traps will
be.Trap size may be limited by your networking software, so adjust this
parameter accordi ngl y.If the trap is bigger than the length you specify, you may
choose to trim insertion strings or the message text first.
Using the field Trap Throttle gives you control of the number of generated traps
in a period of time.You may instruct SMS to stop translation if you have too
many traps in a specific period of time.
Selecting OK saves all settings and traps will now be generated when the events
you specified occur.
6.2.6 Performing Inventory
SMS aids in LAN administration by detecting hardware and software that is
installed in managed machines.Both hardware and software inventories are
kept in the SQL database and accessed through the same GUI.
6.2.6.1 Hardware Inventory
Computer hardware is inventoried for the first time when a user logs on to an
SMS logon server.The logon script will trigger automatic installation of the SMS
client and execution of the inventory scan program.After the first inventory
scan, future inventory scans will be executed in the client computer based on the
frequency set in the Inventory window under the Site Properties window
(Figure 355 on page 221).
Every time that hardware inventory is run, old inventory records in the database
are kept, but moved to inventory history for that machine.SMS compares new
inventory values to inventory history values and any values that do not match
the new settings will show up in red in the administrator GUI.
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Use the Sites window to view hardware inventory for each client.Select the site
where you want to view inventory, then the domain, and double-click on the
machine you want details on.
Figure 411. SMSPersonal Computer PropertiesWindow
The above window graphically shows the inventory data stored in the SMS
database.For each icon selected in the left column you will see a series of
parameters listed as tables in the right portion of the window.If you have run
inventory more than once, you will see the history records buttons available,
allowing you to navigate from current inventory data to previous inventory data.
6.2.6.2 Software Inventory
The most common software inventory method is based on a software description
database.This is where software characteristics are kept.A scanni ng program
compares file entries in the scanned machine to the software database entries.
SMS is no different from other inventory software, but it allows two different
approaches to software inventory: package inventory and software audit.
Package inventory works similar to hardware inventory.Both scans are
performed by the same program at the same time.Software audit, on the other
hand, is less tied to SMS processes, having a separate scanning program and
software database.We describe both methods in this section.
The inventory function in NetFinity is similar to the one in SMS.Both NetFinity
and SMS have software dictionaries to help define software to be discovered,
and both may write to SQL databases.However, NetFinity′s inventory may be
triggered or scheduled any time the administrator requires it.SMS is not as
flexible as that.The NetFinity software inventory window is shown below.
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Figure 412. NetFinitySoftwareInventory
Package Inventory:Package inventory is run together with hardware inventory.
Every time the inventory process is run (as set in Figure 355 on page 221), it will
also detect software packages.The detection of software packages is based on
inventory data entered into each SMS package.As mentioned in 6.2.2,
“Packages and Jobs” on page 226, it is possible to add inventory attributes to
SMS packages.These attributes are used by the inventory scanning program to
find software in scanned machines.
For example, if the administrator knows that Lotus 1-2-3 Version 5 is started in
the client machine by an executable file called 123.EXE, that is 324.886 bytes with
a creation date of 12/15/95, they may input this information into the Lotus 1-2-3
V5 package so that this software will be discovered by the scanning program
during the inventory process.
Inventoried packages are shown when the Packages icon is selected in the left
column of the Personal Computer Properties window.
Figure 413. InventoriedPackage
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Software Audit:Software Audit differs from package inventory in two ways:

It bases its scan on information stored in a rules file.

It is run as a Run Command on Workstation job.
Perform the following steps to set up and run software auditing:
1. Prepare a rul es file.
A rules file contains rules for SMS to find software in scanned machines.
The rules in a rules file are the same as inventory information we specify in
a package. This means file name, size, date, CRC, or other relevant
attributes.You will find a sample rules file in the directory
\SMS\PRIMSITE.SRV\AUDIT.The sample rules file name is AUDIT.RUL.We
created our own rules file for testing, listed below.
package 0 ″1-2-3 5.0 English (International) Win16, Lotus Development″
file ″L14CLS.DLL″ size 312368 crc 62473 187422 64595
file ″C1WUIMGR.DLL″ size 179888 crc 35977 107934 33668
file ″LGALLERY.BMP″ size 151670 crc 30334 91003 60360
package 1 ″1-2-3 4.01 English (International) Win16, Lotus Development″
file ″L14CLS.DLL″ size 180736 crc 36147 108442 31769
file ″C1WUIMGR.DLL″ size 180692 crc 36138 108416 59953
file ″LGALLERY.BMP″ size 151670 crc 30334 91003 60360
package 2 ″WinZip 6.2 English Win32, Nico Mak Computing, Inc″
file ″WINZIP32.EXE″
package 3 ″Paint Shop Pro V4.12 Shareware, JASC Inc″
file ″Psp.exe″
file ″Psp.hlp″
package 4 ″Netscape Navigator V3.0, Netscape Comm Corp″
file ″netscape.exe″ size 2988544
package 5 ″Netscape Communicator Preview R3, Netscape Comm Corp″
file ″netscape.exe″ size 3553792
The basic rules file has syntax such that each defined package has on its
first line the keyword package, package number and a description (in
quotes).The lines following that identify the software.Each line with a file
description must have the keyword file, and additional parameters such as
size, CRC and date.Please refer to the SMS online documentation for
additional rules on file syntax.
The only application we had installed that was in the default rules file in our
testing was SQL Server and it was properly detected.We found that the less
restrictive your rules are, the easier it is to detect packages.
2. Compile your rul es file usi ng RULCFG.BAT.
The text rules file must be compiled into a .CFG file that will be used by the
audi ti ng program.Simply run the RUL2CFG program passing as a
parameter the rules file you want to compile:
rul2cfg myrules.rul
The RUL2CFG script will compile the rules and copy them to the appropriate
directories referenced by the auditing program.You will see that when the
auditing package is defined these directories are shared with the machine
being audited.
3. Create a package for auditing.
In order to run a command on a workstation, you must set up a package,
then a job to execute it.SMS provides a PDF to aid with package creation
for auditing.The file AUDIT.PDF is located in the
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\SMS\PRIMSITE.SRV\IMPORT.SRC\ENU directory.In the Package Properties
window for the new package (Figure 365 on page 226), click on Import and
specify the AUDIT.PDF file.Specify the
\SMS\PRIMSITE.SRV\AUDIT\PACKAGE directory as the package source
directory.The AUDIT.BAT file, contained in this directory, will detect which
environment it is running on and then call the proper executable under the
respective subdirectories (alpha, mips or x86).
The PDF sets all required parameters for the audit package.Note that there
are no sharing or inventory parameters in the package.It is only a
workstation package that will be executed using a run command on the
workstation job.
4. Prepare and run the audi ti ng job.
Create a run command on workstation job for auditing (see 6.2.2, “Packages
and Jobs” on page 226) targeted to the workstations you desire to audit.
The job will show up in the package command manager for each selected
workstation.
Figure 414. SoftwareAuditingJobinPackageCommandManager inWinNT3.51
The audit program runs in a command line session.
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Figure 415. SoftwareAuditingRunningonWindowsNT3.51
Figure 416. SoftwareAuditingRunningonWindows95
5. Check auditing results.
Auditing results are shown with the rest of inventory in the Personal
Computer Properties window.When a computer has been audited it will
have an additional icon in the properties column called Audited Software.
Select it to see the audit results.
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Figure 417. AuditedSoftwareShowninComputer Inventory
6.2.6.3 MIF Extensions
SMS stores its inventory data using DMTF′s MIF format.It is possible to extend
SMS inventory with MIF forms that may be filled in by the user with additional
data required by your implementation.These forms are incorporated into the
personal computer inventory and may be viewed in the Personal Computer
Properties window.Since this information is also part of the database you may
create queries based on the fields you create.
To build MIF forms, SMS provides a utility called the MIF Form Generator, found
in the SMS program group in the administrator machine.
Figure 418. SMSMIFFormGenerator
The MIF Form Generator allows creation of numeric, character and list fields.
After creating and saving your new MIF form, distribute it to the target machines
using a Run Command on Workstation job.The job should simply have a copy
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command to copy the .XNF file to the C:\MS\SMS\BIN directory (or the
drive/directory SMS is installed on at the client machine).
SMS provides a sample MIF form called UINFO.XNF.You may also customize
UINFO.XNF instead of creating a new form.
After package distribution, the client may input the additional inventory data
using the MIF Entry program (see Figure 346 on page 215).
Check the inventoried information in the administrator interface in the Personal
Computer Properties window.
Figure 419. CustomizedInventoryData
6.2.7 Performing Software Distribution
Two mechanisms are provided by SMS to make software available at client
workstations: software distribution and application sharing.We show software
distribution in this section.
Our examples install the Lotus Notes client using both methods.
6.2.7.1 Software Distribution
Software Distribution consists of installing software on client machines in an
automated and unattended fashion.This process may become difficult
depending on how flexible the software′s installation program is.
If the installation program allows you to provide input using a companion file or
other automated method, it will not be very difficult.If not, there are many
details pertinent to each software application that you will need to know to
perform the automated installation.
We use for our example the Lotus Notes client, which has a flexible installation
program and comes with pre-defined PDFs to be used by SMS for software
distribution.
Two steps are required to perform the Lotus Notes Client distribution:
1. Create a package for the software.
A package for distribution may be created manually (as shown in 6.2.2,
“Packages and Jobs” on page 226) or automatically using a package
definition file (PDF).Lotus provides PDFs for the Notes clients on Windows
95 and Windows NT (32NOT45.PDF, listed in Appendix A, “SMS Files” on
page 271).The PDFs are available on the Internet at www.lotus.com.
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The PDF defines parameters for software installation and inventory.The only
parameter you must input manually is the package source directory, that is,
the share name where the installation files reside (see Figure 366 on
page 227).Remember that the SMS service account must have access to
that directory.
[PDF]
Version=1.0
[Manual Setup]
CommandName=Manual Lotus Notes client installation.
CommandLine=INSTALL.EXE
UserInputRequired=TRUE
SupportedPlatforms=Windows95, Windows NT 3.1 (x86)
[Automated Setup]
CommandName=Automated Lotus Notes client installation.
CommandLine= CLIENT32.BAT
UserInputRequired=FALSE
SupportedPlatforms=Windows95, Windows NT 3.1 (x86)
[Package Definition]
Product=Notes (Win 95, NT)
Version=4.5 Client
Comment=Lotus Notes 4.5 for Windows NT and Windows 95.
SetupVariations= Manual, Automated
;[Setup Package for Inventory]
;InventoryThisPackage=TRUE
;Detection Rule Part 1=File 1
;Detection Rule Part 2=AND
;Detection Rule Part 3=File 2
;[File 1]
;FILE=NOTES.EXE
;COLLECT=FALSE
;Checksum=
;DATE=
;SIZE=
;TIME=
Figure 420. PackageDefinitionFilefor LotusNotesClient
Each section in the PDF corresponds to the windows for manual creation of
the package.The inventory parameters in the PDF are commented out.(A
semicolon in the first position of the line indicates a comment.) Remove the
semicolons for the inventory parameters you want to be valid.
Installation parameters in the PDF file contain two install methods: manual
and automatic.Manual installation will simply run the install.exe file in the
client machine from the share you specify in the package source directory
field.Automatic installation will run the batch file CLIENT32.BAT.
echo off
cls
START /wait INSTALL.EXE /A %0\..\CLIENT32.RSP
exit
Figure 421. UnattendedInstallationScript CLIENT32.BAT
CLIENT32.BAT starts the installation program redirecting its input from the
CLIENT32.RSP file (also listed in Appendix A, “SMS Files” on page 271).
Note that CLIENT32.BAT and CLIENT32.RSP must both be in the package
source directory.
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Observe that automated installation is only possible because the
INSTALL.EXE program from Notes allows a /A parameter to get installation
parameters from CLIENT32.RSP.
[User Registration]
UserName =
CompanyName =
[General Information]
InstallType = 1
ProgramGroup = Lotus Applications
StartmenuFolder = Lotus Applications
[NOT]
; The [NOT] section provides information about
; Notes directories.
; Do not modify the BASEDIR symbol.
;
; Use the ″NOTDIR″ field to select the drive
; and directory where you want to install
; Notes program files.
;
; Use the ″NOTWORKDIR″ field to select the drive
; and directory you where you want to store Notes data files
;
BASEDIR = c:\lotus
NOTDIR = c:\Notes\
NOTWORKDIR = c:\Notes\Data\
SizeOfInstall = 2
[CustomizeNOT]
NOTESPROGRAM = 1
NOTESPDATA = 1
NOTESTEMPLATE = 1
NOTESDOCUMENT = 1
NOTESHELP = 1
NOTESHELPLITE = 1
NOTESVIEWER = 1
Figure 422. UnattendedInstallationResponseFileCLIENT32.RSP
The response file for the Lotus Notes client contains parameters such as
user name, what modules to install and which target directories to use.
2. Install the package wi th a job.
You may manually create a job or simply drag and drop the newly created
Notes package onto the client machine in the sites window.Both ways will
take you to the Job Details window (Figure 375 on page 233) to input
additional data for the job and then submit it.
After the job is submitted, it will go through SMS regular job processing until
it reaches the client machines.Our job took over 10 minutes to go through
the send and distribute phases.SMS compacts the entire source directory
during these phases.All source directory contents are loaded to the
database and then made available to all sites.The run phase in the client
was executed by the Package Command Manager without errors.
6.2.8 Performing Remote Troubleshooting
Remote Troubleshooting, Remote Control, and Help Desk are all terms used to
describe the same function: remote take over and control of an SMS client
workstation.
Taking over control in this case means being able to see from your
administrator machine exactly what is displayed on the clients desktop, as well
as remotely controlling the client machine′s keyboard and mouse.SMS actually
shares keyboard and mouse control, that is, when performing the remote
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troubleshooting function, both the administrator and the client have control of the
keyboard and mouse.
This function is available for DOS and Windows machines, and is started from
the Personal Computer Properties window by selecting the Help Desk icon.The
client portion of the help desk function is disabled by default after installation for
security purposes. It must be enabled manually.
Make sure your user ID has permission to use Remote Troubleshooting functions
on the client machines (see Figure 357 on page 222).
USERTSR, USERIPX, WUSER.EXE and WUSER32.EXE are the help desk client
modules, and must be running for remote troubleshooting to work.USERTSR
and USERIPX are TSR (terminate and stay resident) modules used in DOS-based
computers (running DOS and Windows 3.x).WUSER.EXE is the 16-bit executable
that runs on Windows 95 and Windows 3.x computers.WUSER32.EXE runs as a
service on Windows NT machines.The following table illustrates platforms and
required modules for remote troubleshooting to work.
Although the non-Windows NT platforms do support TCP/IP, remote
troubleshooting is implemented in these architectures with NetBIOS over TCP/IP.
Therefore, the LANA number for NetBIOS must be set to the same value both in
the server and client machines for remote troubleshooting to work.Check the
LANA number in the network properties window as shown in the following figure:
Table 8. RemoteTroubleshootingModules
Operating System
Required Client Task
DOS
USERTSR (for NetBIOS and TCP/IP) or USERIPX (for
IPX)
Wi ndows 3.x
USERTSR (for NetBIOS and TCP/IP) or USERIPX (for
IPX), and WUSER
Wi ndows 95
WUSER
Wi ndows NT
WUSER32 (SMS Remote Control Agent service)
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Figure 423. NetworkPropertiesWindow,NetBIOSInterfaceParametersonWindowsNT
V4
On Windows 95, select the Set this protocol to be the default protocol check box
to set the protocol to LANA 0.In our lab, we set NetBEUI to LANA 0 in the
server and client machines.Not setting this parameter correctly will make SMS
fail to locate the client machine.
Select the Help Desk Options icon in the SMS client program group in each
client machine to set remote troubleshooting options.
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Figure 424. SMSHelpDeskOptionsWindow
It is possible to restrict the actions executed by the remote troubleshooting
service with the above panel.Specify which function will be available, whether
or not permission from the client is required, and whether or not there will be a
visible signal for the client when remote troubleshooting is being performed. This
means that the user will be made aware when someone else is accessing their
desktop.
If your setup is correct, when you click on the Help Desk icon in the Personal
Computer Properties window you will see the functions in the right portion of the
window enabled.
Figure 425. SMSPersonal Computer Properties-HelpDesk
Available Help Desk functions are:

Remote Control
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Takes over (shares) screen, keyboard and mouse control.The following
window is displayed.
Figure 426. SMSHelpDeskWindow(QuickWindowsViewer)
Note the five extra buttons on the top right corner of the window.They allow
the administrator to send Control key combinations that do not normally go
through remote control sessi ons (such as Ctrl +Esc, Al t+Tab and
Ct r l +Al t +Del ).
Each icon respectively:
1. Sends a Ct r l +Esc signal.
2. Sends an Al t +Tab signal.
3. Sends a Ct r l +Al t +Del signal.(It is recommended to use the remote
reboot function instead to reboot machines.)
4. Allows Al t combi nati on keys to be directed to the client machi ne (for
exampl e,Al t +F1).
5. Brings up the AREA box to hel p navi gate on di spl ays wi th same or
higher resolution than the current resolution used by the administrator′s
display.
To quit remote troubleshooting, simply close the Quick Viewer window by
double-clicking on the upper left window button.The connection may also
terminated by the user through the Being Accessed window.
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Figure 427. BeingAccessedWarning

Remote Reboot
Performs a coordinated reboot (shutdown and restart) of the client machine.

Remote Chat
Allows chat with the client machine though a text window.

File Transfer
Allows file transfer between the server and client machine via a GUI.

Remote Execute
Executes a command in the client.
6.2.9 Performing Network Monitoring
As with other administration and diagnostic functions, SMS integrates the
Windows Network Monitor Agent and Tools into its administrator interface.The
Network Monitor is a Windows tool that is used to capture network packets and
analyze them based on protocols, packet source and destination.
The Network Monitoring functions are invoked from the Personal Computer
Properties window.Select a computer within a site in the Site window and
double-click on the selected computer to get to the Personal Computer
Properties window.Then, select the Network Monitoring icon in the left column
and the following window will be displayed:
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Figure 428. Personal Computer PropertiesWindow,NetworkMonitoring
The Find Remote Agents button requests SMS to look for agents in remote
networks.SMS allows you to use the remote agents to capture network data in
their local networks and have it sent to your administrator GUI.Remote agents
found by SMS will be reported in the list below the Start Network Monitor button.
Click on Start Network Monitor to start the monitoring process.The network
monitoring window wil l appear.
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Figure 429. NetworkMonitor Window
Refer to 4.2, “Network Monitor” on page 154 for details on Network Monitor
functions.
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Appendix A.SMS Files
This appendix contains the listings for files used by Microsoft′s Systems
Management Server (SMS) referenced in Chapter 6, “SMS” on page 193.
A.1 RUNSMS.BAT
@echo OFF
REM Copyright (C) 1994-1995 Microsoft Corporation
REM
REM This batch file is the Systems Management Server (SMS) script
REM for workstations attaching to a Windows NT or LAN Manager server.
REM It installs the SMS client components and collects hardware and
REM software inventory data.
REM This batch file is run directly from a Windows NT, LAN
REM Manager, or NetWare SMS logon server for DOS, Windows, and Windows
REM NT workstations. To run directly from an SMS logon server, the user
REM must make a network connection (drive mapping) using an available
REM drive letter and then change the current drive to this network
REM drive. This connection must be to SMS_SHR for a Windows NT or LAN
REM Manager server, or to the SMS-volume:SMS-directory\LOGON.SRV
REM directory for a NetWare server.This batch file can also be run
REM from the Windows95 Explorer, or with a UNC such as
REM \\SMS-server\SMS_SHR\RUNSMS.
echo.
echo Microsoft Systems Management Server (SMS)
echo.
REM If the SMSLS environment variable is set on the workstation (e.g.,
REM set SMSLS=1), verbose output will be enabled for SETLS16, CLI_DOS,
REM and INVDOS or SETLS32, CLI_NT and INVWIN32.
if ″%SMSLS%″ == ″″ goto START
set SMS_VERBOSE=/v
echo Executing SMS_SHR script.
goto START
REM Determine the binary files directory on the SMS logon server by
REM checking environment variables for operating system and processor
REM architecture. Set environment variables for this directory and
REM for the OS type. The directory this file exists in and the platform
REM specific directory beneath it are added to the path so that the proper
REM version of SETLS and NLSMSG can be called.
:START
REM Check to see if we can save path and reserve the neccessary environment
REM space before continuing.
set SMS_P=%PATH%
set SMS_TEMP=123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345
if ″%SMS_TEMP%″==″123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345″ goto FIND_OS
goto LOW_ENV
:FIND_OS
set SMS_TEMP=
if ″%OS%″ == ″Windows_NT″ goto NT_BIN
REM Determine the DOS version and exit if OS/2 1.3 or greater.
if not exist %0\..\dosver.com goto NOARG0
%0\..\dosver
if errorlevel 13 goto OS2
goto DOS_BIN
:NOARG0
REM this should only occur on Netware machines running pure netx
dosver
if errorlevel 13 goto OS2
:DOS_BIN
set SMS_OS=16
©
Copyright IBM Corp. 1997
271

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set SMS_BIN=x86.bin
goto RUN_FROM
:NT_BIN
if ″%PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE%″ == ″ALPHA″ goto NT_ALPHA
if ″%PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE%″ == ″MIPS″ goto NT_MIPS
if ″%PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE%″ == ″x86″ goto NT_X86
if ″%PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE%″ == ″PPC″ goto NT_PPC
echo.
echo Unable to determine operating system or processor architecture.
echo.
echo Consult your network administrator.
echo.
pause
goto END
:NT_ALPHA
set SMS_BIN=alpha.bin
set SMS_OS=32
goto RUN_FROM
:NT_MIPS
set SMS_BIN=mips.bin
set SMS_OS=32
goto RUN_FROM
:NT_X86
set SMS_BIN=x86.bin
set SMS_OS=32
goto RUN_FROM
:NT_PPC
REM The PowerPC is not supported in this release.
goto END
:RUN_FROM
if ″%OS%″ == ″Windows_NT″ set PATH=%PATH%;%0\..\%SMS_BIN%
if not ″%OS%″ == ″Windows_NT″ set PATH=%0\..;%0\..\%SMS_BIN%;%PATH%
REM The SETLS program will spawn the executable files for CLI_DOS and
REM INVDOS or CLI_NT and INVWIN32 located on this server.
:RUN_SETLS
if ″%OS%″ == ″Windows_NT″ goto RUN_NT
:RUN_DOS
if not exist %0\..\%SMS_BIN%\setls%SMS_OS%.exe goto NOPATHARG0
setls%SMS_OS% -m:E -i -p:%SMS_BIN%\CLI_DOS.EXE -pa:/p:%%SMS_UNC%%\ -pa:%SMS_VERBOSE% %SMS_VERBOSE%
setls%SMS_OS% -m:E -i -p:%SMS_BIN%\INVDOS.EXE -pa:/l:%%SMS_UNC%%\ -pa:/i -pa:%SMS_VERBOSE% %SMS_VERBOSE%
goto RESTORE
:NOPATHARG0
REM this should only occur on Netware machines running pure netx
%SMS_BIN%\setls%SMS_OS% -m:E -i -p:%SMS_BIN%\CLI_DOS.EXE -pa:/p:%%SMS_UNC%%\
-pa:%SMS_VERBOSE% %SMS_VERBOSE%
%SMS_BIN%\setls%SMS_OS% -m:E -i -p:%SMS_BIN%\INVDOS.EXE -pa:/l:%%SMS_UNC%%\
-pa:/i -pa:%SMS_VERBOSE% %SMS_VERBOSE%
goto RESTORE
:RUN_NT
setls%SMS_OS% -m:E -i -p:%SMS_BIN%\CLI_NT.EXE -pa:/p:%%SMS_UNC%%\
-pa:%SMS_VERBOSE% %SMS_VERBOSE%
setls%SMS_OS% -m:E -i -p:%SMS_BIN%\INVWIN32.EXE -pa:/l:%%SMS_UNC%%\
-pa:/e -pa:/t0 -pa:/i -pa:%SMS_VERBOSE% %SMS_VERBOSE%
goto RESTORE
:OS2
echo.
NLSMSG%SMS_OS% 10 /M ″Please run RUNSMS.CMD from an OS/2 window″
echo.
pause
goto END
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REM RUNSMS was unable to reserve the neccessary amount of environment space
REM and was unable to complete successfully. Increase the available environment
REM space and retry this batch file.
:LOW_ENV
set SMS_TEMP=
REM Try to start a new command shell to procure more env space
REM but only once to avoid extra recursion. The second call to the
REM batch file will have a command line parameter.
if ″%1″ == ″″ goto newshell
echo.
%0\..\x86.bin\NLSMSG16 7 /M ″Not enough environment space″
%0\..\x86.bin\NLSMSG16 8 /M ″Use the /E parameter on the shell= command in config.sys″
%0\..\x86.bin\NLSMSG16 9 /M ″to increase the amount of environment space available.″
pause
goto END
:newshell
command /e:2048 /c %0 retry
goto END
:RESTORE
REM Restore the previous path setting.
PATH=%SMS_P%
goto END
REM Clean up the environment variables.
:END
set SMS_P=
set SMS_OS=
set SMS_BIN=
set SMS_VERBOSE=
Appendi x A.SMS Fi l es
273

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274
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Appendix B.Windows NT Diagnostic Summary
The output of the
winmsd\\barryn/s/f
follows:
Microsoft Diagnostics Report For \\barryn
OS Version Report
Microsoft (R) Windows NT (TM) Server
Version 4.0 (Build 1381: Service Pack 2) x86 Uniprocessor Free
Registered Owner: Barry D. Nusbaum, IBM-ITSO
Product Number: xxxxx-xxx-xxxxxxx-xxxxx
System Report
System: AT/AT COMPATIBLE
Hardware Abstraction Layer: PC Compatible Eisa/Isa HAL
BIOS Date: 12/20/95
BIOS Version: BIOS Version 0.02.04.CC0M
Processor list:
0:x86 Family 5 Model 2 Stepping 11 GenuineIntel 132 Mhz
Video Display Report
BIOS Date: 10/26/95
BIOS Version: Phoenix S3 TRIO64 Enhanced VGA BIOS. Version 1.3-08-21-57Mhz
Adapter:
Setting: 640 x 480 x 256
60 Hz
Type: s3 compatible display adapter
String: Phoenix
Memory: 1 MB
Chip Type: S3 764
DAC Type: S3
Driver:
Vendor: Microsoft Corporation
File(s): s3.sys, s3.dll
Version: 4.00, 4.0.0
Drives Report
C:\(Local - NTFS) Total: 0KB, Free: 0KB
D:\(Local - NTFS) Total: 0KB, Free: 0KB
F:\(Local - NTFS) Total: 0KB, Free: 0KB
Memory Report
Handles: 2,649
Threads: 200
Processes: 32
Physical Memory (K)
Total: 130,484
Available: 71,656
File Cache: 19,456
Services Report
Alerter Running (Automatic)
Computer Browser Running (Automatic)
EventLog (Event log) Running (Automatic)
Server Running (Automatic)
Workstation (NetworkProvider) Running (Automatic)
License Logging Service Running (Automatic)
TCP/IP NetBIOS Helper Running (Automatic)
Messenger Running (Automatic)
FTP Publishing Service Running (Automatic)
Net Logon (RemoteValidation) Running (Automatic)
NT LM Security Support Provider Running (Manual)
Tivoli Object Dispatcher Running (Automatic)
Plug and Play (PlugPlay) Running (Automatic)
Remote Session Manager Running (Automatic)
Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Locator Running (Automatic)
Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Service Running (Automatic)
Simple TCP/IP Services Running (Automatic)
SNMP Running (Automatic)
©
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Spooler (SpoolerGroup) Running (Automatic)
Sybase SQLServer _ BARRYN Running (Automatic)
Tivoli Remote Execution Service Running (Automatic)
World Wide Web Publishing Service Running (Automatic)
Drivers Report
AFD Networking Support Environment (TDI) Running (Automatic)
atapi (SCSI miniport) Running (Boot)
Beep (Base) Running (System)
Cdfs (File system) Running (Disabled)
Cdrom (SCSI CDROM Class) Running (System)
Disk (SCSI Class) Running (Boot)
Diskperf (Filter) Running (Boot)
DLC Protocol Running (System)
Floppy (Primary disk) Running (System)
i8042 Keyboard and PS/2 Mouse Port Driver (Keyboard Port) Running (System)
IAvBoot4 (Extended base) Running (Boot)
IAvFsys4 (Extended base) Running (System)
IBM Auto 16/4 Token-Ring ISA Adapter Driver (NDIS) Running (Automatic)
Keyboard Class Driver (Keyboard Class) Running (System)
KSecDD (Base) Running (System)
Mouse Class Driver (Pointer Class) Running (System)
Msfs (File system) Running (System)
Mup (Network) Running (Manual)
NetBEUI Protocol (PNP_TDI) Running (Automatic)
Microsoft NDIS System Driver (NDIS) Running (System)
NetBIOS Interface (NetBIOSGroup) Running (Manual)
WINS Client(TCP/IP) (PNP_TDI) Running (Automatic)
Npfs (File system) Running (System)
Ntfs (File system) Running (Disabled)
Null (Base) Running (System)
Parallel (Extended base) Running (Automatic)
Parport (Parallel arbitrator) Running (Automatic)
ParVdm (Extended base) Running (Automatic)
Rdr (Network) Running (Manual)
s3 (Video) Running (System)
Serial (Extended base) Running (Automatic)
Srv (Network) Running (Manual)
TCP/IP Service (PNP_TDI) Running (Automatic)
VgaSave (Video Save) Running (System)
IRQ and Port Report
Devices Vector Level Affinity
i8042prt 1 1 0xffffffff
i8042prt 12 12 0xffffffff
Serial 4 4 0x00000000
Serial 3 3 0x00000000
Floppy 6 6 0x00000000
IbmTok4 2 2 0x00000000
atapi 0 14 0x00000000
atapi 0 15 0x00000000
Devices Physical Address Length
i8042prt 0x00000060 0x0000000001
i8042prt 0x00000064 0x0000000001
Parport 0x000003bc 0x0000000003
Serial 0x000003f8 0x0000000007
Serial 0x000002f8 0x0000000007
Floppy 0x000003f0 0x0000000006
Floppy 0x000003f7 0x0000000001
IbmTok4 0x00000a20 0x0000000004
atapi 0x000001f0 0x0000000008
atapi 0x000003f6 0x0000000001
atapi 0x00000170 0x0000000008
atapi 0x00000376 0x0000000001
s3 0x000003c0 0x0000000010
s3 0x000003d4 0x0000000008
s3 0x000042e8 0x0000000002
s3 0x00004ae8 0x0000000002
s3 0x000082e8 0x0000000004
s3 0x000086e8 0x0000000004
s3 0x00008ae8 0x0000000004
s3 0x00008ee8 0x0000000004
s3 0x000092e8 0x0000000004
s3 0x000096e8 0x0000000004
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s3 0x00009ae8 0x0000000004
s3 0x00009ee8 0x0000000004
s3 0x0000a2e8 0x0000000004
s3 0x0000a6e8 0x0000000004
s3 0x0000aae8 0x0000000004
s3 0x0000aee8 0x0000000004
s3 0x0000b6e8 0x0000000004
s3 0x0000bae8 0x0000000004
s3 0x0000bee8 0x0000000004
s3 0x0000e2e8 0x0000000004
s3 0x0000c2e8 0x0000000004
s3 0x0000c6e8 0x0000000004
s3 0x0000cae8 0x0000000004
s3 0x0000cee8 0x0000000004
s3 0x0000d2e8 0x0000000004
s3 0x0000d6e8 0x0000000004
s3 0x0000dae8 0x0000000004
s3 0x0000dee8 0x0000000004
s3 0x0000e6e8 0x0000000004
s3 0x0000eae8 0x0000000004
s3 0x0000eee8 0x0000000004
s3 0x0000f6e8 0x0000000004
s3 0x0000fae8 0x0000000004
s3 0x0000fee8 0x0000000004
VgaSave 0x000003b0 0x000000000c
VgaSave 0x000003c0 0x0000000020
VgaSave 0x000001ce 0x0000000002
Devices Channel Port
Floppy 2 0
Devices Physical Address Length
IbmTok4 0x000da000 0x00002000
IbmTok4 0x000dc000 0x00004000
s3 0x000a0000 0x00010000
s3 0xf8000000 0x04000000
s3 0x000c0000 0x00008000
VgaSave 0x000a0000 0x00020000
DMA and Memory Report
Environment Report
System Environment Variables
BINDIR=f:\tivoli\bin\w32-ix86
ComSpec=C:\WINNT\system32\cmd.exe
DBDIR=F:\tivoli\db\barryn.db
DSLISTEN=TEC
DSQUERY=TEC
IBMAV=C:\IBMAVNT
IBMAV_EXE=C:\IBMAVNT
Include=F:\SYBASE\INCLUDE
INTERP=w32-ix86
LANG=default
Lib=F:\SYBASE\LIB
NLSPATH=f:\tivoli\msg_cat\%%L\%%N.cat
NTRESKIT=C:\NTRESKIT
NUMBER_OF_PROCESSORS=1
o_dispatch=94
OS=Windows_NT
Os2LibPath=C:\WINNT\system32\os2\dll
Path=c:\winnt;c:\winnt\system32;F:\SYBASE\dll;F:\SYBASE\bin;f:\tivoli\bin\w32-ix86\bin;
F:\tivoli\bin\w32-ix86\tools;
F:\tivoli\bin\w32-ix86\ADE;f:\tivoli\bin\w32-ix86\AEF;c:\winnt;
C:\winnt\system32;F:\SYBASE\dll;F:\SYBASE\bin;f:\tivoli\bin\w32-ix86\bin;
F:\tivoli\bin\w32-ix86\tools;f:\tivoli\bin\w32-ix86\ADE;
F:\tivoli\bin\w32-ix86\AEF;c:\winnt;c:\winnt\system32;
F:\SYBASE\dll;F:\SYBASE\bin;%TivPath%;C:\WINNT\System32;C:\hjwin
PERLLIB=f:\tivoli\bin\w32-ix86\tools\lib\perl
PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE=x86
PROCESSOR_IDENTIFIER=x86 Family 5 Model 2 Stepping 11, GenuineIntel
PROCESSOR_LEVEL=5
PROCESSOR_REVISION=020b
SMV2_BASEPATH=C:\SMV2\
SYBASE=F:\SYBASE
TEMP=F:\tivoli\db\barryn.db\tmp
TivPath=f:\tivoli\bin\w32-ix86\bin;f:\tivoli\bin\w32-ix86\tools;f:\tivoli\bin\w32-ix86\ADE;
f:-tivoli-bin-w32-ix86-AEF;TMP=F:\tivoli\db\barryn.db\tmp
windir=C:\WINNT
Environment Variables for Current User
TEMP=C:\TEMP
TMP=C:\TEMP
Appendi x B.Wi ndows NT Di agnosti c Summary
277

This soft copy for use by IBM employees only.
CLASSPATH=.;C:\Program Files\Netscape\Communicator\Program\Java\Classes\fireworks.zip
Network Report
Your Access Level: Admin & Local
Workgroup or Domain: ITSODOM
Network Version: 4.0
LanRoot: ITSODOM
Logged On Users: 1
Current User (1): Administrator
Logon Domain: ITSODOM
Logon Server: BARRYN
Transport: NetBT_IbmTok41, 40-00-98-94-11-89, VC′s: 0, Wan: Wan
Transport: Nbf_IbmTok41, 40-00-98-94-11-89, VC′s: 2, Wan: Wan
Character Wait: 3,600
Collection Time: 250
Maximum Collection Count: 16
Keep Connection: 600
Maximum Commands: 5
Session Time Out: 45
Character Buffer Size: 512
Maximum Threads: 50
Lock Quota: 6,144
Lock Increment: 10
Maximum Locks: 500
Pipe Increment: 10
Maximum Pipes: 500
Cache Time Out: 40
Dormant File Limit: 45
Read Ahead Throughput: 4,294,967,295
Mailslot Buffers: 3
Server Announce Buffers: 20
Illegal Datagrams: 5
Datagram Reset Frequency: 60
Bytes Received: 246,713
SMB′s Received: 1,259
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Appendix C.Special Notices
This publication is intended to help technical support personnel implement
systems management on the NT platform.The information in this publication is
not intended as the specification of any programming interfaces that are
provided by the products mentioned.See the PUBLICATIONS section of the IBM
Programming Announcements for more information about what publications are
considered to be product documentation.
References in this publication to IBM products, programs or services do not
imply that IBM intends to make these available in all countries in which IBM
operates.Any reference to an IBM product, program, or service is not intended
to state or imply that only IBM′s product, program, or service may be used.Any
functionally equivalent program that does not infringe any of IBM′s intellectual
property rights may be used instead of the IBM product, program or service.
Information in this book was developed in conjunction with use of the equipment
specified, and is limited in application to those specific hardware and software
products and levels.
IBM may have patents or pending patent applications covering subject matter in
this document.The furnishing of this document does not give you any license to
these patents.You can send license inquiries, in writing, to the IBM Director of
Licensing, IBM Corporation, 500 Columbus Avenue, Thornwood, NY 10594 USA.
Licensees of this program who wish to have information about it for the purpose
of enabling:(i) the exchange of information between independently created
programs and other programs (including this one) and (ii) the mutual use of the
information which has been exchanged, should contact IBM Corporation, Dept.
600A, Mail Drop 1329, Somers, NY 10589 USA.
Such information may be available, subject to appropriate terms and conditions,
including in some cases, payment of a fee.
The information contained in this document has not been submitted to any
formal IBM test and is distributed AS IS.The information about non-IBM
(″vendor″) products in this manual has been supplied by the vendor and IBM
assumes no responsibility for its accuracy or completeness.The use of this
information or the implementation of any of these techniques is a customer
responsibility and depends on the customer′s ability to evaluate and integrate
them into the customer′s operational environment.While each item may have
been reviewed by IBM for accuracy in a specific situation, there is no guarantee
that the same or similar results will be obtained elsewhere.Customers
attempting to adapt these techniques to their own environments do so at their
own risk.
Reference to PTF numbers that have not been released through the normal
distribution process does not imply general availability.The purpose of
including these reference numbers is to alert IBM customers to specific
information relative to the implementation of the PTF when it becomes available
to each customer according to the normal IBM PTF distribution process.
The following terms are trademarks of the International Business Machines
Corporation in the United States and/or other countries:
©
Copyright IBM Corp. 1997
279

This soft copy for use by IBM employees only.
The following terms are trademarks of other companies:
C-bus is a trademark of Corollary, Inc.
PC Direct is a trademark of Ziff Communications Company and is
used by IBM Corporation under license.
Pentium, MMX, ProShare, LANDesk and ActionMedia are
trademarks or registered trademarks of Intel Corporation in the U.S.
and other countries.
Tivoli, TME, TME 10, Tivoli Management Environment, Tivoli/Enterprise
Console, Tivoli/Courier, Tivoli Management Platform, Tivoli/AEF,
Tivoli/ADE, Tivoli Management Framework and TME Desktop for Windows
are trademarks of Tivoli Systems Inc., an IBM company.
UNIX is a registered trademark in the United States and other
countries licensed exclusively through X/Open Company Limited.
Microsoft, Windows, Windows NT and the Windows 95 logo
are trademarks or registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.
Java and HotJava are trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc.
Other company, product, and service names may be trademarks or service
marks of others.
AFP AIX
AnyNet AS/400
AT Cl i ent Access
Current DB2
I BM MVS
NetFinity NetView
OpenEdition OS/2
OS/390 PowerPC
PS/2 RISC System/6000
RMONi tor RS/6000
S/390 SystemVi ew
System/390 Troubl e Ticket
VTAM 400
I BM
Domi no Lotus Devel opment Corporati on
Lotus Notes Lotus Devel opment Corporati on
Lotus Lotus Devel opment Corporati on
Notes Lotus Devel opment Corporati on
NotesVi ew Lotus Devel opment Corporati on
Repl i cati on Lotus Devel opment Corporati on
280
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Appendix D.Related Publications
The publications listed in this section are considered particularly suitable for a
more detailed discussion of the topics covered in this redbook.
D.1 International Technical Support Organization Publications
For information on ordering these ITSO publications see “How to Get ITSO
Redbooks” on page 283.

Systems Management from an NT Server Point of View, SG24-4723

LAN Management Process (Alerts/Monitoring) Using NetFinity, SG24-4517

Setting Up a TME 3.0 NT Environment, SG24-4819

NetFinity V5.0 Database Support, SG24-4808

NetFinity V5.0 Command Line and LMU Support, SG24-4925
D.2 Redbooks on CD-ROMs
Redbooks are also available on CD-ROMs.Order a subscription and receive
updates 2-4 times a year at significant savings.
CD-ROM Title Subscription
Number
Collection Kit
Number
System/390 Redbooks Collection SBOF-7201 SK2T-2177
Networki ng and Systems Management Redbooks Col l ecti on SBOF-7370 SK2T-6022
Transacti on Processi ng and Data Management Redbook SBOF-7240 SK2T-8038
AS/400 Redbooks Collection SBOF-7270 SK2T-2849
RS/6000 Redbooks Collection (HTML, BkMgr) SBOF-7230 SK2T-8040
RS/6000 Redbooks Collection (PostScript) SBOF-7205 SK2T-8041
Appl i cati on Devel opment Redbooks Col l ecti on SBOF-7290 SK2T-8037
Personal Systems Redbooks Col l ecti on SBOF-7250 SK2T-8042
D.3 Other Publications
These publications are also relevant as further information sources:

Windows NT Server Survival Guide, SR23-7364

Windows NT Server Professional Reference, SR23-7365

Special Edition Using Microsoft Systems Management 1.2, SR23-7830
©
Copyright IBM Corp. 1997
281

This soft copy for use by IBM employees only.
282
Wi ndows NT Systems Management

This soft copy for use by IBM employees only.
How to Get ITSO Redbooks
This section explains how both customers and IBM employees can find out about ITSO redbooks, CD-ROMs,
workshops, and residencies.A form for ordering books and CD-ROMs is also provided.
This information was current at the time of publication, but is continually subject to change.The latest
information may be found at URL
http://www.redbooks.ibm.com
.
How IBM Employees Can Get ITSO Redbooks
Employees may request ITSO deliverables (redbooks, BookManager BOOKs, and CD-ROMs) and information about
redbooks, workshops, and residencies in the following ways:

PUBORDER — to order hardcopies in United States

GOPHER link to the Internet - type
GOPHER.WTSCPOK.ITSO.IBM.COM

Tools disks
To get LIST3820s of redbooks, type one of the following commands:
TOOLS SENDTO EHONE4 TOOLS2 REDPRINT GET SG24xxxx PACKAGE
TOOLS SENDTO CANVM2 TOOLS REDPRINT GET SG24xxxx PACKAGE (Canadian users only)
To get BookManager BOOKs of redbooks, type the following command:
TOOLCAT REDBOOKS
To get lists of redbooks, type one of the following commands:
TOOLS SENDTO USDIST MKTTOOLS MKTTOOLS GET ITSOCAT TXT
TOOLS SENDTO USDIST MKTTOOLS MKTTOOLS GET LISTSERV PACKAGE
To register for information on workshops, residencies, and redbooks, type the following command:
TOOLS SENDTO WTSCPOK TOOLS ZDISK GET ITSOREGI 1996
For a list of product area specialists in the ITSO: type the following command:
TOOLS SENDTO WTSCPOK TOOLS ZDISK GET ORGCARD PACKAGE

Redbooks Home Page on the World Wide Web
http://w3.itso.ibm.com/redbooks

IBM Direct Publications Catalog on the World Wide Web
http://www.elink.ibmlink.ibm.com/pbl/pbl
IBM employees may obtain LIST3820s of redbooks from this page.

REDBOOKS category on INEWS

Online — send orders to: USIB6FPL at IBMMAIL or DKIBMBSH at IBMMAIL

Internet Listserver
With an Internet e-mail address, anyone can subscribe to an IBM Announcement Listserver.To initiate the
service, send an e-mail note to
announce@webster.ibmlink.ibm.com
with the keyword
subscribe
in the body of
the note (leave the subject line blank).A category form and detailed instructions will be sent to you.
Redpieces
For information so current it is still in the process of being written, look at ″Redpi eces″ on the Redbooks Home
Page (
http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/redpieces.htm
). Redpieces are redbooks in progress; not all redbooks
become redpieces, and sometimes just a few chapters will be published this way.The intent is to get the
information out much quicker than the formal publishing process allows.
©
Copyright IBM Corp. 1997
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How Customers Can Get ITSO Redbooks
Customers may request ITSO deliverables (redbooks, BookManager BOOKs, and CD-ROMs) and information about
redbooks, workshops, and residencies in the following ways:

Online Orders — send orders to:

Telephone orders

Mail Orders — send orders to:

Fax — send orders to:

1-800-IBM-4FAX (United States) or (+1)001-408-256-5422 (Outside USA) — ask for:
Index # 4421 Abstracts of new redbooks
Index # 4422 IBM redbooks
Index # 4420 Redbooks for last six months

Direct Services - send note to
softwareshop@vnet.ibm.com

On the World Wide Web
Redbooks Home Page http://www.redbooks.i bm.com
IBM Direct Publications Catalog http://www.el i nk.i bml i nk.i bm.com/pbl/pbl

Internet Listserver
With an Internet e-mail address, anyone can subscribe to an IBM Announcement Listserver.To initiate the
service, send an e-mail note to
announce@webster.ibmlink.ibm.com
wi th the keyword
subscribe
in the body of
the note (leave the subject line blank).
Redpieces
For information so current it is still in the process of being written, look at ″Redpi eces″ on the Redbooks Home
Page (
http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/redpieces.htm
). Redpieces are redbooks in progress; not all redbooks
become redpieces, and sometimes just a few chapters will be published this way.The intent is to get the
information out much quicker than the formal publishing process allows.
IBMMAIL Internet
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Index
Numerics
802.2 i nterface 96
A
Access Control Lists 49, 86
account management 24
ADDUSERS.EXE command 29, 32, 33, 35
Admi ni strati on Requests database 90
al ert 173, 174, 183, 245
Al ert Vi ew 173
automati c cl i ent i nstal l ati on 211
Automati cal l y Confi gure Workstati on Logon Scri pts
opti on 213
B
basi c authenti cati on 27
bi bl i ography 281
broadcast message 53
C
cacl s.exe command 52
central si te 194
Chal l enge/Response 27
child sites 194
Clear Text 25
Client Service for NetWare 134
Communi cati ons Server for Wi ndows 106
communi ty name 19
CP name 101, 108, 111
D
di rectory repl i cator servi ce 211
domai n control l ers 7
Domi no 189
DUMPEL.EXE 165, 196
E
Event Viewer 165, 196, 251
Explorer 23, 47, 49, 50
G
Gateway Service for NetWare 134, 140
H
Help Desk 262
http://www.l otus.com 14
http://www.l otus.com/di r_mktg/SNMP45.htm 14
http://www.mi crosoft.com/arti cl es/q130/5/64.htm 19
http://www.mi crosoft.com/kb/softl i b/.209
I
IBM LLC2 Protocol 96, 98
IEEE 802.2 LAN interface 107
Internet Informati on Server 24
Internet Informati on Server MIB 5, 10
Inventory Properti es wi ndow 221
J
Job Target 233
j obs 226, 234
Jobs wi ndow 232
L
LLC2 Dri ver 96
LLC2 protocol 105
Lotus Notes 74
Lotus Notes server 5
M
Machi ne Groups wi ndow 244
MIB Compi l er 18
Mi crosoft Internet Expl orer 25
Mi crosoft SNA Server 119
N
NET CONFIG command 71
NET GROUP command 40
Net ID 101, 125
NET SEND command 54
NET SESSION command 67
NET SHARE command 45, 49
NetFi ni ty 182
NetWare
Client for Windows NT 141, 144
connecti ons 147
Gateway Servi ce 140
password 146
NetWare.139
Network Moni tor Agent 206, 267
Network Nei ghborhood 146
Networks Coordi nated Logon 148, 150
Notes user ID 74
NOTES.INI file 15, 75
NT Resource Kit 5
NT service 5
NT Web Administration 23, 27
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ntserver/webadmi n/webadmi ndl.htm.23
O
ODBC i nterface 21
P
Package Command Manager 215
package definition files (PDFs) 230, 231, 257
package definiton files (PDFs) 261
package i nventory 255
packages 226, 234, 260
Packages button 242
Packages icon 255
parent si te 194
Parent Site window 223
Performance Management 182
Performance Moni tor 18, 168, 174, 176, 183, 189,
190, 192
permi ssi ons 34
pol l i ng i nterval 20
pri mary si te 194, 201, 204
pri nter management 24
R
rcl i ent 55
regi stry key 5
Remote Consol e 56
Remote Consol e Server 55
Remote Control 262
Remote Troubl eshooti ng 262
RMTSHARE command 48
RUNSMS.BAT script 210
S
secondary si te 194
Sender servi ce 223
senders 195, 225
server management 24
sessi on management 24
share management 24
Share Package job 232
Shared Di rectori es 43
Shutdown.exe command 58
Single Logon service 76
Site Code field 204
Site Groups window 244
Site Properties window 221
si tes 218
SMS Resource Kit 197
SMSLS.BAT 214
SNMP 183, 247
Browser 18
Control Rights 16
functi ons 5
MON.EXE 20
SNMP
(continued)
Moni t or 18
traps 225, 247, 250
software i nventory 254
SQL Enterprise Manager 198
subsi tes 194
T
Task Manager 178
TELNET 28
Tivoli Event Console 168
Ti vol i Management Pl atform 168
TME 10 NetView 6
TN3270E Server 110, 113, 118
traps 19, 248
Type of Access 48
U
user synchroni zati on 74, 75, 80
W
Windows NT Diagnostics Program 70
Windows NT Resource Kit 21, 37
Windows NT Resources Kit 165
WUSER.EXE 217, 263
WUSER32.EXE 217, 263
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Windows NT Systems Management
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