Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment

An IBM Redbook Publication
IBM Redbook Form Number: SG24-7934-00
ISBN: 0738435813
ISBN: 9780738435817
Publication Date: 21-Oct-2011
Last Update Date: 25-Oct-2011
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Alex Louwe Kooijmans - Author [+5] [-5]
Anshu Kak - Author
Shaun A. Crain - Author
Andrej Crepinsek - Author
Venkata Gadepalli - Author
Ian Hall - Author

Abstract


Many companies have a complex process for purchasing software that is required by IT projects, or better, by the business. Usually software is purchased by a centralized procurement function, and is either purchased on a project-by-project basis or as a large periodic software contract.

Unfortunately purchasing software products does not automatically mean that these products are exploited throughout the organization providing the maximum possible value to the business units. Several issues call for a structured approach that gets the most business value out of software already purchased. The objectives of this approach are to:

Create maximum awareness throughout the organization of the software purchased.
Track software use in IT projects and act if products are not used at all, used improperly, or insufficiently used.
Facilitate use of software products in projects, especially when software products are complex and require a lot of integration.

We can summarize the overall objective of this approach as ensuring that the business units in an organization obtain the maximum possible value of software products purchased, which is also the scope of this IBM® Redbooks® publication.

Language

English

Table of Content


Forewords
Chapter 1. Software deployment perspectives and challenges
Chapter 2. The IBM software deployment method
Chapter 3. Accelerating software deployment using best practices
Chapter 4. Accelerating software deployment using tools and assets
Chapter 5. Using IBM Services to complement your skills and accelerate value
Chapter 6. Building self-sufficiency using training
Chapter 7. The value of maintaining IBM Software Subscription and Support (S&S)
Chapter 8. How to effectively engage with IBM customer support
Chapter 9. Software deployment success stories from our clients
Appendix A. The IBM Enterprise License Agreement
Appendix B. Managing complex software deployment projects
Appendix C. Services offerings
ibm.com/redbooks
Value Realization from
Efficient Software
Deployment
Anshu Kak
Alex Louwe Kooijmans
Shaun A. Crain
Andrej Crepinsek
Venkata Gadepalli
Ian Hall
Value realization
Methods, tools, and assets
Best practices
Front cover


Value Realization from Efficient Software
Deployment
October 2011
International Technical Support Organization
SG24-7934-00

© Copyright International Business Machines Corporation 2011. All rights reserved.
Note to U.S. Government Users Restricted Rights -- Use, duplication or disclosure restricted by GSA ADP
Schedule Contract with IBM Corp.
First Edition (October 2011)
Note: Before using this information and the product it supports, read the information in
“Notices” on page xi.

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2011. All rights reserved.
i
Foreword
Endorsements
Software is only valuable if it is deployed, used and delivers capabilities that
provide increased efficiency, reduced costs or accelerated opportunities for your
business. Too often, a software solution fails to live up to its expectations and
does not generate the expected value. The reason for these failures often has
less to do with the software itself and more likely aligns with the degree to which
the life cycle involved with software delivery is followed and managed. While
software delivery starts with the identification of a problem or opportunity and the
definition of a set of associated requirements, it continues on throughout the
implementation, measurement, education, support and ongoing value delivery.
Throughout this book, IBM has done an excellent job of formalizing important
aspects of a software delivery life cycle and highlights the process, resources,
services and capabilities they provide. By utilizing this process, businesses
should expect to increase their success rate in creating business value with IBM
products and demonstrates the IBM commitment to being an active partner with
their customers at every step of the way.
William Mitlehner, Executive at a Health Care Provider

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Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
As an IBM client, you know all too well that the value you receive from software
happens after it is deployed within your organization. That is why we place a
great deal of importance on the steps taken by IBM specialists to ensure that
your deployment is successful. This layer of technical support can yield
tremendous results for you by quickly improving your operations and positively
impacting your business outcomes. IBM also benefits from your successful
software deployment, strengthening your trust in our ability to partner with you on
everything from software renewals to transformational business projects.
This IBM Redbooks publication highlights real-world deployment issues that will
better enable our field teams to guide you through the process of deploying IBM
Software. This book builds on an initiative we started a few years ago to guide
and track software development and deployment with our top clients worldwide.
By incorporating the feedback and wisdom of some of our client teams and top
clients, we have been able to accelerate the business value we bring to you
through software.
It’s time for a fresh perspective on successful deployment of software. This book
discusses new methods, tools, and best practices to manage the deployment
process. Clients who have purchased IBM Software, especially for stand-alone
projects or enterprise contracts, will find this book invaluable.
Thank you to the team who took the time to keep this important topic current and
make this book both informative and enjoyable to read.
Respectfully,
Steve Mills
Senior Vice President and Group Executive, Software and Systems
IBM Software Group

Foreword
iii
The true value of software solutions comes through the successful deployment of
those solutions. Delivering value to your business is our top priority at IBM, with a
strong focus on helping you successfully deploy the software you purchased.
This book is a great guide to software deployment that provides you with true
business value as quickly as possible.
Robert LeBlanc
Senior Vice President, Middleware Software
IBM Software Group
Software provides incredible value to an organization to solve business
challenges. Software can help improve business processes, manage capital
goods and human knowledge, speed transactions, capture data, find insights in
large sets of information, and in general can make businesses more profitable
and organizations more effective. But for software to do this, it needs to be
planned, installed, and deployed.
This IBM Redbooks publication provides a comprehensive framework for how
any organization can build quality implementation plans and deploy software
quickly. By using these tested approaches, technical and business teams can
accelerate projects and reap the benefits of their projects in the shortest amount
of time
The individuals who have developed the materials in this book are seasoned
professionals, each with many years of experience in architecting and managing
software deployment projects with IBM clients around the world. This is our third
-- and best -- edition, developed in consultation directly with our prestigious
clients as well as with IBM technical teams. I recommend that you take
advantage of their experience, captured here in this book, to help make your own
deployment processes more effective.
Dale Rebhorn
Vice President, Client Technical Professionals
IBM Software Group

iv
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2011. All rights reserved.
v
Contents
Foreword. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .i
Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .xi
Trademarks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xii
Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv
The team who wrote this book. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .xvi
Now you can become a published author, too! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .xix
Comments welcome. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xx
Stay connected to IBM Redbooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xx
Chapter 1. Software deployment perspectives and challenges . . . . . . . . . 1
1.1 What this chapter is about. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
1.2 Benefits of deployment efficiency and a relationship with IBM . . . . . . . . . . 3
1.3 Software deployment challenges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1.3.1 Deployment ownership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1.3.2 Organizational challenges. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
1.3.3 Technical challenges. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
1.3.4 Other challenges. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
1.3.5 Tools to assist with the challenges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
1.4 Value realization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
1.4.1 Approaches to value realization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
1.4.2 Measurement of hard and soft returns on investment . . . . . . . . . . . 11
1.4.3 Managing issues that inhibit or prevent value realization . . . . . . . . . 14
1.5 Conclusion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Chapter 2. The IBM software deployment method. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
2.1 What this chapter is about. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
2.2 Software deployment roles in a business partnership. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
2.2.1 Client roles and responsibilities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
2.2.2 IBM roles and responsibilities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
2.2.3 Third-party roles and responsibilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
2.3 Software deployment work products. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
2.3.1 Software deployment plan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
2.3.2 Readiness plan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
2.3.3 Software deployment tracking report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
2.3.4 Change management or substitution report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
2.4 The software deployment method. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
2.4.1 Prepare for deployment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

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Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
2.4.2 Execute the deployment plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
2.4.3 Measure deployment success. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Chapter 3. Accelerating software deployment using best practices . . . . 47
3.1 What this chapter is about. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
3.1.1 Case study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
3.2 Best practices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
3.2.1 Identifying an executive business sponsor and stakeholders. . . . . . 50
3.2.2 Defining a governance structure for the deployment process. . . . . . 52
3.2.3 Centralizing software fulfillment and license management. . . . . . . . 53
3.2.4 Engaging consulting and implementation services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
3.2.5 Defining your return on investment strategy and time-to-value. . . . . 56
3.2.6 Conducting workshops to assure deployment readiness . . . . . . . . . 57
3.2.7 Identifying strong project and resource management. . . . . . . . . . . . 59
3.2.8 Committing to self-sufficiency. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
3.2.9 Communicating and market the vision . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Chapter 4. Accelerating software deployment using tools and assets . . 61
4.1 What this chapter is about. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
4.2 Enterprise architecture and portfolio management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
4.2.1 Introduction to EA and portfolio management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
4.2.2 What is the EA process?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
4.2.3 IT portfolio management in EA governance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
4.2.4 The value of enterprise architecture and portfolio management in
software deployment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
4.2.5 License and compliance management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
4.2.6 Addtional tools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
4.3 Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
4.3.1 Tools that facilitate software deployment management . . . . . . . . . . 72
4.3.2 Tools that facilitate software deployment tracking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
4.3.3 Tools that facilitate software product compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
4.3.4 Self-help tools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
4.4 Software deployment accelerators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
4.4.1 Proof of Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
4.4.2 Client lab advocacy program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
4.4.3 IBM solution review. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
4.4.4 The software Accelerated Value Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
4.4.5 Business and IT alignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
4.5 Guidances. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
4.5.1 Frameworks, models, and other reusable assets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
4.5.2 IBM Global Solution Centers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
4.6 Conclusion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Chapter 5. Using IBM Services to complement your skills and accelerate

Contents
vii
value. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
5.1 What this chapter is about. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
5.2 Why you need services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
5.3 Types of valuable IBM services for software deployment. . . . . . . . . . . . 116
5.4 Services offerings specific to software deployment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
5.4.1 Accelerated Value Program and deployment management case study
118
5.4.2 Rapid Deployment Services: A new approach to getting your
deployment kick-started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
5.4.3 Proof of Concept. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
5.5 Services organizations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
5.6 Conclusions and recommendations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Chapter 6. Building self-sufficiency using training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
6.1 What this chapter is about. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
6.2 Required skill sets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
6.2.1 Implementation skills. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
6.2.2 Technical administration and operations skills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
6.2.3 User training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
6.3 Portfolio of training offerings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
6.3.1 Free training programs and tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
6.3.2 Standard classroom training. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
6.3.3 Distance learning or e-Learning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
6.3.4 Customized training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
6.3.5 IBM software conferences and events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
Chapter 7. The value of maintaining IBM Software Subscription and Support
(S&S) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
7.1 What this chapter is about. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
7.2 Software support offerings from IBM. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
7.2.1 What S&S includes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
7.2.2 Other support offerings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
7.3 The value of S&S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
7.4 Keeping your software license agreements active . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
7.5 Conclusion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
Chapter 8. How to effectively engage with IBM customer support . . . . 153
8.1 What this chapter is about. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
8.2 Response objectives and hours of operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
8.2.1 Software Support Center hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
8.2.2 Monthly License Charge and System z platform incidents. . . . . . . 155
8.2.3 Support during non-business hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
8.3 Before contacting the IBM Software Support Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
8.3.1 Understanding severity levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156

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Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
8.3.2 Incident information to have available before contacting support. . 157
8.3.3 Contact information to have available before contacting support. . 158
8.4 Submitting incidents electronically . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
8.4.1 Online support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
8.4.2 Service request tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
8.5 Submitting incidents by telephone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
8.6 Code defects. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
8.7 Non-critical support questions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
8.8 Checking the status of a problem management record. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
8.9 Escalating an incident. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
8.10 Incidents not covered by the IBM Software Support Center. . . . . . . . . 162
8.11 Client responsibilities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
Chapter 9. Software deployment success stories from our clients. . . . 165
9.1 What this chapter is about. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
9.2 Client background. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
9.3 Solution. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
9.4 Deployment strategy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
9.4.1 Implementing global configuration standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
9.4.2 Domino on System p and AIX. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
9.5 Technical challenges. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
9.6 Organizational challenges. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
9.7 Deliverables and outcomes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
9.7.1 Notes and Domino enhancement process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
9.7.2 End-to-End Performance Optimization: Consultative Study by IBM175
9.7.3 Mail routing changes to support more accurate mail routing . . . . . 176
9.7.4 Notes 8.5.1 design review, deployment planning, and product roadmap
sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
9.7.5 Notes quality assurance testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
9.7.6 Administration best practices and knowledge sharing with the IBM
Domino administration team. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
9.7.7 Application server upgrade and application compatibility review of Notes
8.5.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
9.7.8 Notes Support Best Practices Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
9.7.9 Education plans and the joint work with IBM. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
9.7.10 Corporate Communications Plan—Joint Work with IBM. . . . . . . . 180
9.7.11 Lotus Connections integration with Notes and the IBM widget design
assistance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
9.8 IBM deployment best practices as applied to this project. . . . . . . . . . . . 181
9.8.1 Identifying the Executive Business Sponsor and stakeholders. . . . 181
9.8.2 Defining a governance structure for the deployment process. . . . . 182
9.8.3 Centralizing software fulfillment and license management tools. . . 183
9.8.4 Engaging consulting and implementation services. . . . . . . . . . . . . 183

Contents
ix
9.8.5 Defining your return on investment strategy and time to value. . . . 184
9.8.6 Conducting workshops to assure deployment readiness . . . . . . . . 185
9.8.7 Identifying strong project and resource management. . . . . . . . . . . 185
9.8.8 Committing to self-sufficiency. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
9.8.9 Communicating and marketing the vision. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186
Appendix A. The IBM Enterprise License Agreement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
The IBM enterprise license agreement and how it provides value to the client188
Potential ELA content. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
Value basket. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
Substitution. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
Why and how an IBM ELA is significant from a software deployment perspective
190
Risk and compliance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191
Appendix B. Managing complex software deployment projects . . . . . . 193
What makes software deployment projects complex. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194
Global projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194
Multivendor projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194
Changing requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
Aggressive timelines. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
Constrained human resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
Lack of skills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196
Lack of budget. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196
Organizational issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
Approaches to solving issues. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
Collaboration tools and techniques. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198
Project management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198
Enterprise architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
Change management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
IBM resources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
Private development and test clouds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
Public development and test clouds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
Hybrid clouds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
Cloud assessment services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202
Appendix C. Services offerings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203
About this appendix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204
IBM Software Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204
Global Business Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209
Global Technology Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210
Systems and Technology Group Lab Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211
Business Partner services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214

x
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2011. All rights reserved.
xi
Notices
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responsibility to evaluate and verify the operation of any non-IBM product, program, or service.
IBM may have patents or pending patent applications covering subject matter described in this document.
The furnishing of this document does not give you any license to these patents. You can send license
inquiries, in writing, to:
IBM Director of Licensing, IBM Corporation, North Castle Drive, Armonk, NY 10504-1785 U.S.A.
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xii
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
Trademarks
IBM, the IBM logo, and ibm.com are trademarks or registered trademarks of International Business
Machines Corporation in the United States, other countries, or both. These and other IBM trademarked
terms are marked on their first occurrence in this information with the appropriate symbol (® or ™),
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list of IBM trademarks is available on the Web at http://www.ibm.com/legal/copytrade.shtml
The following terms are trademarks of the International Business Machines Corporation in the United States,
other countries, or both:
AIX®
BladeCenter®
Cognos®
DataPower®
DB2®
Domino®
Dynamic Infrastructure®
FileNet®
Focal Point™
Global Business Services®
IBM®
Lotus Notes®
LotusLive™
Lotusphere®
Lotus®
Notes®
PartnerWorld®
Passport Advantage®
Power Systems™
POWER®
Project Conductor™
pSeries®
Quickr™
Rational Team Concert™
Rational®
Redbooks®
Redpapers™
Redbooks (logo) ®
S/390®
Sametime®
Smarter Planet™
System i®
System p®
System Storage®
System x®
System z®
Tivoli®
WebSphere®

Notices
xiii
XIV®
z/OS®
z/VM®
zSeries®
The following terms are trademarks of other companies:
Java, and all Java-based trademarks are trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc. in the United States, other
countries, or both.
Microsoft, Windows, and the Windows logo are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States,
other countries, or both.
UNIX is a registered trademark of The Open Group in the United States and other countries.
Linux is a trademark of Linus Torvalds in the United States, other countries, or both.
Other company, product, or service names may be trademarks or service marks of others.

xiv
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2011. All rights reserved.
xv
Preface
IBM® is working with you and all of our clients to build a Smarter Planet™. IBM
software delivers many of the components and solutions that are needed to
deliver that promise of a Smarter Planet in your organization. However, unless
the software is used, or deployed as we call it, it can never demonstrate its value.
Many companies have a complex process for purchasing software that is
required by IT projects, or better, by the business. Usually software is purchased
by a centralized procurement function, and is either purchased on a
project-by-project basis or as a large periodic software contract.
Unfortunately purchasing software products does not automatically mean that
these products are exploited throughout the organization providing the maximum
possible value to the business units. Issues that typically arise are:
When software is purchased as a large periodic (for example bi-annual)
software contract, not everyone in the organization is aware of exactly what
was purchased. This might even lead to situations where a project team
attempts to select and even purchase software, while a software product with
the required functionality is already on the shelf.
Even though the intention is to fully understand all functionality and the value
of each software product prior to purchasing it, it is not uncommon that there
is very limited knowledge throughout the organization after the purchase.
Many times only a few individuals are involved in the verification of the
purchase of software products and the rest of the organization remains
relatively unaware of the capabilities.
After the software begins to be actually deployed to projects, not enough
preparation occurs to be ready for use, which can be a matter of education of
the project members or proper configuration of software prior to using it.
These issues call for a structured approach that enforces to get the most
business value out of software already purchased. The objectives of this
approach are to:
Create maximum
awareness
throughout the organization of the software
purchased. Not just the titles of the software products, but also the product’s
capabilities and information about where these products can provide value to
the business.

Track
software usage in IT projects and act if certain software products are
not used at all, used improperly, or insufficiently used. After all, there was a
reason why a software product was purchased in the first place, and there

xvi
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
must be a process in place to assure that the original goals of the software
purchase are met.

Facilitate
use of software products in projects, especially in situations where
software products are complex and where there is a lot of integration. This
can mean anything from running education sessions to using services
offerings from IBM or other vendors to help plan and prepare activities.
We can summarize the overall objective of this approach as making sure that the
business units in an organization obtain the maximum possible value of software
products purchased, which is also the scope of this IBM Redbooks® publication.
The team who wrote this book
This book was produced by a team of software architects and software
deployment leaders from around the world.
This effort was initiated and led by Anshu Kak, Distinguished Engineer,
Worldwide Software Client Architect Leadership Team.
Alex Louwe Kooijmans was the International Technical Support Organization
(ITSO) Project Leader for the development of this IBM Redbooks publication.
Anshu Kak is a Distinguished Engineer in the IBM Software Group. She is an
IBM Chief Technology Officer (CTO) in the Software Group and a Client
Technical Professional for Cloud Computing and Smarter Computing. Previously,
she was IBM CTO for the Middle East and Africa. Prior to that, Anshu lead the
Worldwide Software IT Architect Community. Anshu is recognized as a leader in
the deployment of architecture and the design of complex, end-to-end client
solutions using her deep technical expertise in enterprise architecture,
WebSphere®, service-oriented architecture (SOA), and cloud and master data
management. Anshu is a certified enterprise architect of The Open Group
Architecture Framework. Anshu is focused on strengthening the skills of the
software IT architect community and has a passion for developing the
architecture skills of key growth markets, including Russia, India, South Africa,
Middle East, Latin America, and China. In addition, Anshu spearheaded the
software deployment initiative for the IBM Software Group by putting the
structure in place and working with teams and clients worldwide on this initiative.
She authored the IBM internal book, Guidance to Successful Software
Deployment. Anshu is a tenacious advocate of technical vitality, both inside and
outside of IBM. Twice she received the Women In Color Technology All-Star
Award from a national magazine. She is a member of Open Group, the
Association for Computing Machinery, and the Women in Technology
consortium. She is an IBM Ambassador to New York University in New York.

Preface
xvii
Alex Louwe Kooijmans is a project leader with the ITSO in Poughkeepsie, NY,
and specializes in service-oriented architecture technology and solutions using
System z®. He also specializes in application modernization and transformation
on z/OS®, both from an architectural and tooling perspective. Previously, he
worked as a Client IT Architect in the financial services sector with IBM in the
Netherlands, advising financial services companies about IT issues, such as
software, hardware, and on-demand strategies. Alex also worked at the
Technical Marketing Competence Center for zSeries® and Linux in Boeblingen,
Germany, providing support to customers starting up with Java and WebSphere
on System z. From 1997 to 2000, Alex completed a previous assignment with the
ITSO, managing various IBM Redbooks projects and delivering workshops
around the world in the area of WebSphere, Java, and e-business technology
using System z. Prior to 1997, Alex held a variety of positions in application
design and development, product support, and project management, mostly in
relation to the IBM mainframe. Alex has 23 years of IT experience and is the lead
author of many IBM Redbooks and Redpapers™.
Shaun A. Crain is the Software Architect Executive and Software Deployment
Leader for IBM Asia Pacific, based in Canberra, Australia. He has 26 years of
experience in the IT field in both technical and leadership roles. He spent ten
years with the Australian Government in a variety of roles, including application
development, UNIX, and other systems administration and infrastructure
management and leadership roles, including Director of IT Facilities. Since that
time, Shaun has spent 16 years working for IT vendors in technical pre-sales and
sales roles for both hardware and software products and services. He has an IT
degree from the University of Canberra, Australia. His areas of expertise include
software solution design and deployment, and he has an interest in social
software and in the government industry. Shaun previously authored technical
articles published in specialist publications, and this is his first book as a
co-author.
Andrej Crepinsek is a CTO for IBM Central & Eastern Europe. He has worked at
IBM since 1992, and before his appointment as a CTO, he led the IBM Software
Architect regional teams for eight years. He is an Opengroup Distinguished
Certified IT Architect with a strong background in methodologies, enterprise
architecture, and project management. He used this knowledge in developing
relationships toward successful software deployment. Andrej was also acting as
an IBM Software Deployment Leader for the Central & Eastern Europe, Middle
East, Africa, Austria, Switzerland regions and for the Central & Eastern Europe,
Middle East, and Africa regions.

xviii
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
Venkata Gadepalli is a Senior Managing Consultant in the IBM Software
Services for the WebSphere organization where he works as part of the
Worldwide Technology Practice. He worked extensively with the WebSphere
suite of products, performing proofs of concept, pilots, and architecture design.
He also specializes in business process management, application server
infrastructure, and, more recently, WebSphere Cloudburst. Vishy is also a
co-author of WebSphere Portal Primer, published by IBM Press.
Ian Hall is a Certified IT Architect in the New York area Software Business Unit.
Ian has been with IBM for 32 years and a Software Client Architect for ten. He is
the co-lead Software Client Architect on the Americas Integrated Operating Team
for the financial markets industry. He serves on the Americas IT Architecture
Certification Board and is currently the lead Software Client Architect for
Citigroup.
Thanks to the following people for their invaluable contributions to this project:
William Mitlehner
Executive from a Health Care Provider
Michelle Zaremskas
Executive from a Health Care Provider
Chris Duffy
Australian Bureau of Statistics
Karen Dewar
IBM Director of Client Technical Professionals and Services, Software Group
Southwest IOT
Alberto Salkeld
IBM Director of Client Value Acceleration, SWG Technical Team
Geoff Harrold
IBM Software Sales, ELA Deployment Architect
Colin Lam
IBM Executive, Greater China Geography, Software Client Architects
Elizabeth Chavez
Client experience executive, IBM Software Group North America
Julie King
Former IBM

Preface
xix
Special thanks to Wayne Smith, IBM Engagement Executive, Engagement
Management Team, NY Business Unit, for his contribution to this IBM Redbooks
publication.
Thanks to Karen Lawrence, Ella Buslovich, and KaTrina Love at the International
Technical Support Organization for their technical writing, graphics, and editing
support.
Thanks to the authors of the previous edition of this book:
Bill Bierds, WW IBM Software Group, Program Executive, Customer Success
Strategies
Jeremy Gibson, Program Manager, Customer Success Strategies
David Backman, Program Executive, Software IT Architect Community
Mike Ransom, ITSO Project Leader
Reid S. Byers, Software IT Architect
Now you can become a published author, too!
Here's an opportunity to spotlight your skills, grow your career, and become a
published author—all at the same time! Join an ITSO residency project and help
write a book in your area of expertise, while honing your experience using
leading-edge technologies. Your efforts will help to increase product acceptance
and customer satisfaction, as you expand your network of technical contacts and
relationships. Residencies run from two to six weeks in length, and you can
participate either in person or as a remote resident working from your home
base.
Obtain more information about the residency program, browse the residency
index, and apply online at:
ibm.com/redbooks/residencies.html

xx
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
Comments welcome
Your comments are important to us!
We want our books to be as helpful as possible. Send us your s about this book
or other IBM Redbooks publications in one of the following ways:
Use the online Contact us review Redbooks form found at:
ibm.com/redbooks
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© Copyright IBM Corp. 2011. All rights reserved.
1
Chapter 1.
Software deployment
perspectives and challenges
1

2
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
1.1 What this chapter is about
What is software deployment, and how can its value be measured? To some,
software deployment is the process of realizing value from purchased software.
To others, it is the process of putting software and software solutions into place to
ultimately drive business success. These and other perspectives have a common
theme: that software is an investment; one that can only be measured in terms of
cost until it is successfully deployed and used.
Measuring the benefits derived from software deployment, or determining its
value realization, is one of the primary challenges in IT organizations today. This
applies whether an organization purchased a single product, a suite of products,
or perhaps they entered into an enterprise agreement with IBM.
Mr. Steve Mills, IBM Senior Vice President and Group Executive for Software and
Systems, states, “I've never met a customer who wants to buy software.
(Customers) want to deploy software, and they want to know who's going to be
there after they deploy it”
.
1

Customers want to achieve business goals in the
shortest time frame, with the lowest cost, and the smartest use of software that
can support this goal.
To maximize the availability of IT solutions to an organization, it is critical that
software deployment methods are efficient. It is not efficient, for example, to
purchase software licenses and not use the product. This is not only an inefficient
use of funds but also not possible to demonstrate the value of the purchase. A
successful deployment provides indisputable value and functionality to the
organization and therefore success for you. Working closely with IBM to deploy
software, this value can be realized.
In your deployment endeavors, your goals are likely three-fold, to:
Save money on existing, projected, and future requirements, thus achieving
value
Deliver productivity gains for ongoing activities by reducing expenses and
increasing staff productivity
Deliver IT innovation to your line of business users and to gain and maintain a
competitive advantage
In this chapter, we explore value realization, its benefits and challenges, and
methods for its measurement. We also examine the typical challenges of
software deployment. In this publication, we bring our extensive experience in
software deployment to your organization to help you to:
1
http://money.cnn.com/magazines/business2/business2_archive/2003/04/01/339816/index.htm

Chapter 1. Software deployment perspectives and challenges
3
Bring true value and sustainability to your deployment activities
Determine and achieve value realization in your environment
1.2 Benefits of deployment efficiency and a relationship
with IBM
Software deployment is about realizing the highest value provided by the
software. The complexity of selecting and using the right technologies for your
situation and architecting a solution based on those technologies requires deep
technology skills and expertise. An interlock with IBM as a technology vendor is
crucial for success.
Software deployment is also about developing and maintaining a relationship
with IBM so that your deployments are as efficient as possible. Our vision is to
create a win/win relationship. Your relationship with IBM is more than just with
our technical and sales teams. You can also utilize IBM for usage and
architecture patterns and other best practices, software support services, and
educational offerings.
Other benefits of this relationship, as demonstrated with other clients, might
include the ability to:
Build IT strategies around preferred vendor offerings
Deliver pricing consistency, eliminating the need for individual negotiations by
product and project
Deliver further pricing consistency for budget and ongoing planning purposes
Contain the overall costs of software
Deliver on service level agreements (SLAs) to your line of business user
community
Reassure that the vendor will “make it right”
Obtain software easily, by download, by simple email template, or by an
electronic ordering system
Access the IBM skilled resources, such as subject matter experts (SMEs)
The benefits of effective software deployment extend beyond the use of new
software. Benefits are also derived from the software that your organization
currently uses.
The IBM methodologies in Redbooks are designed to deliver success and value
to your organization.

4
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
1.3 Software deployment challenges
In our experience, we learned that some clients frequently do not recognize the
level of commitment required to achieve deployment success. This is an
important oversight in the deployment process, so we discuss this in more detail,
next.
1.3.1 Deployment ownership
Successful deployments require that one person, or one team, has ownership of
the deployment process. You as the client are ultimately the owner of your
deployment projects. Our experience shows that, in many instances,
unsuccessful deployments did not have this required component. There was no
team with the explicit charge of owning the process. Figure 1-1 depicts the
ownership and responsibilities that are essentials for successful deployments,
from the perspectives of both you and IBM.
Figure 1-1 Software deployment ownership and responsibilities
Services
Software architectCustomer
Customer service sales representative
Pie 1
•Deployment ownership
•Software deployment best practices
Identify an enterprise business sponsor
Centralize software fulfillment
Implement a license management tool
Hire deployment services
Assure deployment readiness
Commit to self-sufficiency
Define a time to value and ROI strategy
Develop and execute readiness plan with IBM
Communicate and market contract
Customer Team
IBM Team
Account relationship
Contract enquiries and challenges
Software fulfillment
Uncover deployment projects
Access to deployment services
Lead the analysis and the design of projects
Advise customer on the software
deployment best practices.
Develop and execute readiness plan with
customer
Conduct technical assessment review

Chapter 1. Software deployment perspectives and challenges
5
Ownership of the deployment essentials in Figure 1-1 on page 4 is critical.
Examples follow, in which proper ownership was not taken. These examples
shed light on how significant proper ownership is and the gaps that might result:
A deployment strategy is not mapped out. Software is not assigned to a
project or early projects are not identified, and the scope and schedule of
software implementation is not considered.
The identification and sourcing of appropriate, skilled resources is not carried
out, nor is the building of appropriate internal skills.
A transition plan from the purchasing team to the implementation team does
not clearly articulate expectations, roles, and responsibilities.
Deployment projects do not finish on time. Software deployment is inherently
complex and involves multiple components and organizations. Therefore,
project management that is reactive, rather than proactive, results in delayed
implementation due to challenges that arise late in the process.
Successful solutions and deployment methods are not used across the
broader enterprise. The client and IBM are tasked with a single
implementation. Therefore, they do not focus on using the lessons,
experiences, and investment from this single need across the broader
environment.
The lack of focus in each of these areas resulted in a less than optimal return
from the software investment. It also spawned situations in which multiple
projects ran in parallel, and there was inadequate infrastructure or mechanics to
use common components, tasks, resources, and lessons.
In contrast, successful deployment requires proactive focus and attention from
both you and IBM in the following areas:
Understanding and qualifying the initial demand (projects)
Identifying the core team, with individuals from your organization and IBM,
who will coordinate the overall software deployment process
Developing a deployment strategy that will achieve defined business goals
Continually defining new projects that help to overcome new challenges
Implementing good overall IT governance practices, such as deployment
status tracking, software license management tooling, and portfolio
management processes
1.3.2 Organizational challenges
Getting value from your software purchase and the business projects that the
software supports might force you to face serious threats from organizational and

6
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
political problems within your business. These organizational challenges might
include:

Reorganization of the company structure:
This causes uncertainty in the roles
and responsibilities for software deployment.

Mergers and acquisitions:
These might cause doubt about the strength of
business projects, or possibly serious delays, while decisions are made about
duplicate systems and organization mergers.

Key role changes:
Changes in key C-level executives in your organization, or
key stakeholders for a specific project, might delay or suspend deployment.

Objections and preferences:
Individual stakeholder objections, or executives
with conflicting business objectives or technical preferences, can send a
project off track or cause doubt in the organization about the viability of the
solution.
Although this book is not purposed with providing guidance for these challenges,
in the context of software deployment, it is important to recognize and identify
these challenges and to implement a plan to address them.
1.3.3 Technical challenges
Deployment of software in the 21st century is no longer about the simple
installation of a product and training in the use of it. Deployment now involves an
architected set of products, often from multiple vendors, and the integration of
these products into existing environments.
A good architecture-based solution design was likely in existence in your
organization before you purchased the software currently being deployed. But
even with the best planning, you can still encounter technical challenges in
software deployment. These technical challenges generally fall into the following
categories:
Integration: Problems connecting one piece of software to another new or
existing product or service
Product faults: The software or hardware does not perform the function as
specified by the manufacturer
Product fit for purpose problems: The product does what the manufacturer
intended, but does not suit the current requirement
Product knowledge: The team does not have the level of skill or product
knowledge to implement the solution properly
Scalability and other non-functional usability challenges: The product works,
but it does not provide the expected performance or user experience

Chapter 1. Software deployment perspectives and challenges
7
These are all well-known issues that impact all IT projects. In this book, we
recommend a set of best practices
2
that can reduce the impact these challenges.
We also explain how you can use IBM Services
3
and IBM Subscription &
Support (S&S)
4
to address technical issues with IBM products should they occur.
1.3.4 Other challenges
Regardless of the size or scale of a particular deployment, several challenges
must be addressed in every deployment:
Separation of the solution design and negotiation teams from the
implementation team: Ideally, key members of the implementation team and
key stakeholders participate in the development and negotiation of any
agreement. This commences a sense of ownership and ensures that
business goals drive the product selection process. If these teams are
separate, a complete transition in ownership is vital. Roles and
responsibilities must be crisply defined, assumptions clarified, and
expectations documented. It is too easy for early projects to falter or become
delayed when teams try to collect information and direction from the
negotiation process after the fact.
When software is purchased, the associated projects might not be concretely
defined to maximize software utilization: Because of this, additional planning
is needed to identify projects that will put the purchased software to use. In
addition, new or changing business needs will arise and must be responded
to throughout the deployment cycle.
The persons in the organization who own software deployment must be
identified and involved during project identification and product selection: With
these persons identified, they will be aware of the products that were
purchased and the business challenges that the agreement was crafted to
solve.
If any individuals or areas of the organization are opposed to the vendor or
the products purchased, address this early: A negative perception at an early
stage has the potential of undermining the success of one or more projects.
The deployment of software sold can cross a wide range of departments,
lines of business, and multiple contacts that might or might not have been
included in the sales or negotiation phases of the agreement: To maximize
deployment performance, the entire IT organization must be aligned behind
one mission, regardless of how tactical the individual project needs might be.
2
Refer to “Best practices” on page 50.
3
Refer to Chapter 5, “Using IBM Services to complement your skills and accelerate value” on
page 113.
4
Refer to Chapter 8, “How to effectively engage with IBM customer support” on page 153.

8
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
It is not uncommon for software to remain unused for long periods of time
during the term of the agreement: Recognizing this situation early and putting
actions in place to prevent this is critical.
1.3.5 Tools to assist with the challenges
To assist in your deployment success, IBM developed the software deployment
method, which we discuss in “Tools” on page 71. In this Tools section, we also
discuss acceleration tools and deployment best practices that we developed (see
“Best practices” on page 50).
1.4 Value realization
Software is an investment that can only be measured in terms of cost until it is
successfully deployed and used. After it is deployed and used, how is the value
realization of that product measured?
Software is part of an overall solution that includes other infrastructure
components, such as server hardware and networking infrastructure. The
implementation of software, and the value to be obtained from it, is dependent on
the successful implementation of the surrounding solution components and
architecture.
During the process of selecting and procuring the solution, some customers work
with the IBM client team to develop a Business Value Assessment. This
assessment might outline the expected business return in financial terms, the
business value items, or perhaps the returns in process improvement.
1.4.1 Approaches to value realization
Our observation is that clients use one of three typical approaches to obtaining
and measuring value from software, as shown in Figure 1-2 on page 9.

Chapter 1. Software deployment perspectives and challenges
9
Figure 1-2 Three approaches to value realization
The approaches to value realization are:
Tactical commodity approach: The most simplistic approach to measuring the
value of your software is at the time of purchase. In this approach, software is
selected, purchased, and consumed based on cost. Little or no consideration
is given to the return to the business from the benefits of using the software.
Therefore, the value is measured by purchase price, or whether it was
purchased at a discount or using the least expensive option. Ongoing value is
not often measured, and ongoing S&S charges for the products are measured
as an expense. Often, there is little or no ongoing relationship with the vendor,
and minimal support is requested. A tactical purchase cost approach might be
valid for specific, low-value commodity software, such as an office automation
tool for each desktop.
When this approach is used for extensive software agreements, however, it
might not drive the correct use of the purchased software. Some clients
implement internal charging mechanisms to help measure the value for their
Cost of Software
Minimal Support
Services Separate
Value: Cheapest Price
Tactical Commodity
Approach
Cost of Software
Amount Deployed
Invest in Support and
Services
Value Deployed
versus Cost
Value: Standardization
of Software
Value: Strategic Platforms
and Standards
Value: Bulk and Forward
Purchasing Prices
Strategic Relationship
Approach
SOFTWARE VALUE
Cost of Software
Amount Deployed
Investment in Support and
Services
Business Project Returns
Value as per Strategic
Relationship Approach
PLUS
Value: Impact of Project
on Business
Value: Relationship
With IBM
Strategic Business
Value Approach

10
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
procurement process, or they might continue to test the market for alternative
solutions for each project against the purchased software. These practices
are not recommended because they often lead to low value from the
purchase, a lack of standardization, and possibly extra costs.
Strategic relationship approach: A better approach to purchasing and
measuring the value of software is with a strategic relationship established
with IBM. Using this approach, the software is chosen as a strategic platform
or with a specific solution outcome that is bought for large projects, based on
a solution provided by IBM or an integration partner. Here, the value can be
measured by how much of the software is in use and by the purchase cost.
For example, software that is purchased to implement a specific solution is
often considered valuable only after the solution is implemented.
Clients who choose this approach to gain an understanding of the value of
software often value:
– Additional proactive support offerings to maintain the infrastructure
– An ongoing relationship with IBM to use the solution as effectively as
possible
Strategic business value approach: In our experience, customers that have
the most success in obtaining business value from their software are more
interested in the business return value of a project and program of work
supported by the software than merely the value of the software itself. The
cost of the software is of minimal concern when compared to the value to the
business or the project or systems associated with it. With a strategic
business value approach, the software is chosen as a strategic platform, and
a partnership with IBM is attached to business projects and strategic plans.
If you take this approach, you also value the additional support and
deployment services from IBM to ensure that your internal team focuses on
business value. Measuring the value of software is not as easy with this
approach because you must consider the amount of software deployed, the
outcome of the project, and the impact of the project on the organization.
We often see that our clients with enterprise agreements move sequentially
through each of these approaches over several years as their own maturity in
using the products and the relationship with IBM develops. We do see a clear
trend of customers achieving greater value from their agreements after adopting
one of these strategic approaches.
Whichever approach is most natural for your organization, the software must be
used to gather the most value from it. In this book, we outline the best practices
and a proven method for the governance of software deployment to help you
achieve value from this investment.

Chapter 1. Software deployment perspectives and challenges
11
1.4.2 Measurement of hard and soft returns on investment
Significant investments in IBM software can be realized when all teams have the
same perception of value in the investment and when any issues regarding value
realization are addressed properly and effectively. You might consider the value
of your software investment from either a tactical, cost perspective, or a strategic
project value perspective. In either case, there are both hard (tangible) and soft
(intangible) measurements that apply to determining your returns on investment
(ROIs).
A hard ROI can be quantified with numbers, whereas a soft ROI is based on
factors, such as perception, intuition, and qualitative indicators. Soft ROI should
not be deprecated in favor of a hard ROI when determining the true value of
software deployment projects.
An awareness of ROI helps an organization to understand the potential value
from investing in the deployment of hardware, software, and services. Whether
the drivers for the purchase are based on proactive needs or a simple reaction to
perceived trends, the desire to track and quantify benefits is absolute.
Typically, the ROI is driven by a business that is interested in achieving cost
savings or increased productivity. Therefore, it is essential to quantify pragmatic,
tangible benefits that are tied directly to the business goals and objectives of your
organization.
Figure 1-3 on page 12 illustrates the primary factors affecting hard and soft ROIs.

12
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
Figure 1-3 Factors affecting hard and soft ROIs
Hard ROIs
The following hard ROI factors can be used to measure the value of software
deployment projects:
Head count savings: Software solutions can provide automation and
operational efficiencies that increase productivity. This allows for more work to
be done by the same number of employees, reducing the need for new hires.
Alternatively, the current workload can be handled by fewer employees. Your
finance or human resources department can determine the full cost per
employee, so that head count savings can be mapped to dollars saved.
System count reduction: Hardware has fixed costs associated with it.
Therefore, solutions connected with reducing hardware inventory by using the
hardware more efficiently are tangible solutions, making dollars saved
quantifiable.
SOFT-ROI
SATISFACTION
VISION
ACHIEVE
INNOVATION
CUSTOMER
ENHANCE
EMPLOYEE
EFFICIENCY
STRATEGIC
PROMOTE
GROWTH
USABILITY
BUSINESS

Chapter 1. Software deployment perspectives and challenges
13
Server consolidation: It might be less expensive to move solutions from
several small machines to fewer larger machines, while maintaining or
improving the level of service. Again, because hardware costs are fixed, the
dollars saved can be quantified.
Software license re-use: An architected solution for your deployed software
has the potential to provide savings in license costs and integration costs and
lower administration and maintenance costs.
Department closures: Sometimes, a solution eliminates the need for entire
departments. This elimination can include head count savings, system count
reductions, and server consolidations. It can also include the elimination of
telephone, facility, or real estate costs, each of which has associated savings.
Professional studies that quantify hard ROI require a significant time
commitment; in some cases, six to nine months. These studies involve
questionnaires and interviews that can contain hundreds of questions.
Because many departments in the company are asked to participate, the time
investment can be substantial. When the process is complete, it can take
days or weeks for the analysis and results to be made available.
Additionally, even hard ROI is somewhat subjective. Keep these points in
mind before embarking on the lengthy process of defining ROI in this manner
Leveraging Business Value Assessments: Be sure to take advantage of any
IBM business value assessments that were prepared during the solutioning
process with IBM. (For more information about assessments and client value
methods, speak with your IBM representative.) There might have been one or
more IBM software brand-specific assessments prepared, and there also
might have been an industry assessment prepared for the value of an IBM
industry solution. The cost information gathered during the assessment
process can be reused to provide hard ROI metrics for software deployment
projects.
Soft ROIs
Soft ROI factors that can be used to measure the value of software deployment
projects include:
Helping the company achieve its strategic vision: It can be difficult to quantify
the value of attaining the business vision, but there should be no question that
attaining it produces value.
Enhancing usability: Suppose that the multiple applications that employees
work with were to have the same look and feel. There are productivity and
satisfaction gains from achieving such a goal.
Promoting business growth: Most businesses want to grow. Solutions that
support seamless business expansion are of value.

14
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
Streamlining the work within the company: Efficiency is hard to measure, but
employees usually know when it is missing. Solutions that re-engineer
organizations or streamline processes might have soft ROI but important ROI
nonetheless.
Developing an innovative process: Coupled with thought leadership and
executive business sponsorship, software solutions can deliver enhanced
collaboration and a harvesting of ideas that can be used to create valuable
innovative initiatives.
Improving client satisfaction: Evaluate how employees feel about their jobs,
their departments, the processes they follow, their productivity, the tools they
use, their upper management, and their employer.
1.4.3 Managing issues that inhibit or prevent value realization
In the discussion about 1.3, “Software deployment challenges” on page 4, we
outlined several challenges that can hinder the value realization of software.
These challenges, along with other issues, require proactive attention to
minimize their impact.
The key to minimizing these challenges is a simple approach:
Recognize the issues
Plan to resolve issues
Put plans into action
Implement and measure success
These steps are depicted graphically in Figure 1-4 on page 15.

Chapter 1. Software deployment perspectives and challenges
15
Figure 1-4 The approach to minimizing deployment challenges
Recognize the issues
As discussed in 1.3.1, “Deployment ownership” on page 4, the ownership of
deployment activities in your organization belongs to you. It is your responsibility
to monitor the progress and success of software deployment activities and to be
watchful for factors that might disrupt the project or relationship. The IBM client
team can provide support for product issue resolution. We can also help with
monitoring for issues and communicating them with you as the owner. It is,
therefore, important to maintain a good communications strategy among both
teams.
Software issues can be categorized and classified in terms of severity and
impact. When this is done, there are a number of well-known issues that typically
surface:
Product support: IBM Support might need to be engaged to resolve product
problems or questions. See Chapter 8, “How to effectively engage with IBM
customer support” on page 153.
Consumability: Software consumability refers to both the ease of installation
and the ease of use of one or more software products in a solution. The IBM
Software Group is constantly working to improve the consumability of its
middleware as the portfolio continues to expand and provide new functions,
features, and solutions.
Managing challenges to value realization
Recognize Issue
Implement the pl an,
measure success
Put plan into
acti on
Plan t o resolve

16
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
Skills: You and IBM are working together to understand the level of skills that
are available to implement the software solution. Certain skills gaps can be
anticipated prior to the onset of the deployment project. These skills must be
mitigated by appropriate means, such as skills transfer, education, training,
and mentoring activities. Other gaps in skills might be encountered over the
course of a project, for example, when a project change request is accepted.
These gaps must be addressed immediately. Skills gaps and their resolution
must be considered in the overall project planning and delivery of the solution.
Project management: Plan your software deployment projects so that they are
delivered with the correct resources. Effective project management is
essential to project success, but not every software deployment project can or
will have a professional project manager assigned. It is important for your
Executive Business Sponsor, with the help of the IBM software teams, to
determine early on whether adequate project management is available.
Software projects succeed or fail according to the ability to establish and
maintain adequate awareness of the following factors throughout the project
life cycle:
– Budget: Project management is always a trade-off between costs and
time-to-value. What sources of funding exist and how can they be applied
to the project? Does the project manager have access to funding? What
are the requirements for funding the project, and what resources are
available at no extra cost?
– Resources: Well-managed projects can be run with a minimum of
additional participants who merely compare status. Beyond additional
funding, who are the project task members? Who are the vendor and
integration partner product experts? Who is responsible? Who is
accountable? Who needs to be consulted? What means of project status
communications will be used? Who are the escalation points of contact
within your organization and IBM if high severity issues are encountered?
– Change requests: How will project changes be requested, assessed,
reviewed, agreed upon, and rejected?
– Scope creep: How will new or changed project goals and requirements are
managed? How are out-of-scope project change requests going to be
handled?
During the life cycle of the project, it is important to discuss checkpoints with
project sponsors often. By doing this, you can determine whether expectations
for the outcome increased, and therefore determine if the plan must be adjusted
to deliver the additional expected results.

Chapter 1. Software deployment perspectives and challenges
17
Plan an issue resolution
Your organization already has processes for problem management, escalation,
and resolution. However, it is important to recognize the external parties that
might be able to assist in this process.
IBM client teams and architects: IBM software client architects and other IBM
employees can be key resources in resolving deployment issues. These
resources often know your account and project well, and they can provide
advice about the capabilities that IBM has available to assist you. Some
issues, for example, are the result of a lack of understanding of our products,
and in these cases the IBM client team can certainly help.
IBM Subscription and Support (S&S): For technical problems with specific
IBM products, engage the IBM S&S group. Your IT staff can work with IBM
S&S and other IBM resources to resolve software issues.
IBM Services: IBM can be engaged to deliver services for any part of your
deployment or issue resolution process. More information about IBM Services
offerings and capabilities are included in Chapter 5, “Using IBM Services to
complement your skills and accelerate value” on page 113 and in
Appendix C, “Services offerings” on page 203.
Other Clients: IBM can connect you with other clients that might have
experienced similar situations, allowing you to learn from them.
Business Partners: IBM has a large number of Business Partners that deliver
solutions using IBM software products. These Business Partners can be
engaged in multiple phases of the software deployment life cycle. In certain
cases, they are involved in the implementation and confirmation of value of
certain deployment projects. The capabilities of Business Partners for issue
resolution should not be overlooked, nor should the need to keep Business
Partners aware of software issues that can impact a solution they are working
on with the client. To contact one of the IBM Business Partners, speak with
your IBM software representative.
Implement the plan
Realize that software projects are intended to support a business process, and
delays in a project can cause considerable business impact. A key risk in the
value realization of software projects is not implementing action plans when
IBM client relationship representation: Most clients have IBM client
relationship representation. The IBM client relationship representation is
always interested in the project status of any IBM solution that can impact
client satisfaction. When you become aware of any IBM software project
issues that can impact your value, bring this to the attention of the IBM client
representative or IBM software client architect as soon as possible.

18
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
issues arise. If an issue is identified that is hindering the deployment progress, it
is essential that a plan be established and executed. Time delays before putting
the plan into action might further compound the impact on the value to your
business.
Implementing and measuring success
This book provides a guide for implementing your plan and measuring its
success. See:
“Accelerating software deployment using best practices” on page 47
“Accelerating software deployment using tools and assets” on page 61
“Building self-sufficiency using training” on page 129
“Using IBM Services to complement your skills and accelerate value” on
page 113
“How to effectively engage with IBM customer support” on page 153
“The value of maintaining IBM Software Subscription and Support (S&S)” on
page 143
1.5 Conclusion
Effective software deployment is a mixture of many facets, as outlined in this
chapter. Determining the value of each deployment project is more than
considering the purchase price and implementation costs of the software. Rather,
the value of software must be measured in its return to the business from the
projects using that software.
Ensuring that you achieve the best value from your software is the result of
superior planning, monitoring, and issue management. Taking a strategic
approach to the relationship with your software vendor, and examining the value
of the software in the context of business returns, is a best practice and gets the
best results.

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2011. All rights reserved.
19
Chapter 2.
The IBM software
deployment method
2

20
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
2.1 What this chapter is about
The extensive experience of IBM in software deployment has proven to be of
great value to our customers. We designed deployment methods across
industries, across platforms, for small business and global enterprises. Because
of our background, we have the expertise to put processes into place to assist
you in preparing and deploying software and in realizing business value.
This chapter describes the value our expertise can add to your overall
deployment design and methods.
Software deployment is an iterative process, with each phase building on the
previous phase, and adjustments made throughout the process. Visually, the
process looks Figure 2-1.
Figure 2-1 Broad depiction of the IBM software deployment method
What is the best way to execute the IBM software deployment method? There
are lots of opinions and theories that can be accomplished by you, either
DM0
PREPARE
EXECUTE
DM1
DM4
DM3
DM2
DM7
DM8
DM5
DM6
DM9
MEASURE
DM0 Create the
software
deployment team
DM1 Review the contract
Content and Critical
deployment documents
DM2 Understand the projects for deployment
Output – Start Deployment Plan
DM3 Finalize deployment plan
Output – Update Deployment Plan
DM4 Conduct
deployment Kickoff
meeting
DM5 Prepare Readiness
Plan
Output – Readiness plans
DM6 Execute Quick Deployment Wins
DM7 Execute and monitor the
deployment plan
Output – Update Depl oyment
DM8 Manage project
and Solution changes
Output – Change
Management /
Substi tution report
DM9 Measure the success of deployment

Chapter 2. The IBM software deployment method
21
independently or with the experts at IBM who provide guidance on getting the
most value for your software purchase.
Our experience with clients enable us to become keenly aware of oversights and
pitfalls that can occur during the deployment process. We support your efforts to
deploy efficiently, and we want to provide you with guidance in preventing
negative impacts, such as:
Improper or inadequate planning: This occurs when a deployment strategy is
not mapped out. Early projects are not identified, and neither the
implementation scope, nor the schedule, is considered.
Lack of details: The transition plan from the purchasing team to the
implementation team does not clearly articulate the expectations, roles, and
responsibilities of the project and the team members.
Planned deployment projects are not carried out on schedule: Software
deployment is inherently complex because it involves multiple components
and multiple teams within the organization. When project management tasks
are applied reactively, the result is often delayed implementation because of
challenges that arise late in the deployment process.
Oversights and errors result in less than optimal success of the software
deployment project. They spawn situations where multiple projects are run in
parallel without adequate infrastructure or projects that are run without proper
planning for the efficient use of common components, tasks, resources, lessons,
and so forth. This suggests that successful software deployment, both during the
identification of deployment opportunities and during actual deployments, can
best occur with significant planning. This is where you and IBM work together the
best.
Overall, for software deployment to be successful, a proactive focus is required
from both the client and IBM in the following areas:
Qualifying the initial demands (projects)
Identifying the core deployment team, representing you and IBM
Developing a deployment strategy
Defining additional projects that can use the purchased software to overcome
challenges
To address these needs, IBM established a software deployment method. There
are three foundational phases of the method:
Prepare for deployment.
Execute the deployment plan.
Measure deployment success.

22
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
Within each of these phases, we defined the following ten processes:
DM0 Define the software deployment team.
DM1 Review the contract content and critical deployment documents.
DM2 Understand the projects for deployment.
DM3 Finalize the deployment plan.
DM4 Conduct a deployment kickoff meeting.
DM5 Prepare the Readiness Plan.
DM6 Execute Quick Deployment Wins.
DM7 Execute and monitor the deployment plan.
DM8 Manage project and solution changes.
DM9 Measure the success of the deployment.
Figure 2-2 graphically conveys these ten tasks.
Figure 2-2 The ten individual tasks of the IBM software deployment method
2.2 Software deployment roles in a business
partnership
The proper identification of roles and responsibilities enables the deployment
method to be executed smoothly. When this is done, each team member knows
what to do, how to do it, and when to begin, which is especially useful when

Chapter 2. The IBM software deployment method
23
problems arise during deployment. This approach also leads to a significantly
streamlined deployment process. The following list is an overview of the major
roles in the process of software deployment, from the perspectives of the client,
IBM, and third-party vendors.
The client team:
– Executive Business Sponsor
– Program Manager
– Procurement Officer
– Other Stakeholders and Project Sponsors
– Project Managers
– Enterprise IT Architect
– Project Members
– Consultants
The vendor team (for example, the IBM client team):
– IBM Client Executive
– IBM Software Client Leader
– IBM Enterprise Architect
– IBM Enterprise Deployment Manager
– IBM Technical resources (IT Specialists)
Third Party Roles and Responsibilities
– Business Partner IT Architect
2.2.1 Client roles and responsibilities
In this section, we discuss the roles and responsibilities on the client side.
Executive business sponsor
The executive business sponsor is the key stakeholder for a software deployment
initiative. This person is responsible for what business value organization
receives from a certain contract or projects and is the most concerned with the
realization of the value of the software assets that were invested in by the firm.
Program manager
The program manager role is the lead manager for a portfolio of projects that
must deploy software. The program manager is a lead executive role. Multiple
project managers and project teams might report to that person. Executive
business sponsors and other stakeholders typically receive project updates from
the program manager, and they can also communicate project change requests
to the program manager for distribution to the individual project teams.

24
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
Procurement officer
The procurement officer works in a financial capacity and is responsible for
software license purchases and the cost effectiveness of them.
Other stakeholders and project sponsors
Stakeholders other than the executive business sponsor have an interest in
deployment projects, for example:
A project that implements a portal to provide a new face to clients might be
close to the goals of the marketing manager.
A project that delivers improved reporting and business analytics can have
relevance to an executive in charge of risk management.
The IBM client team works with the client to determine the relevant stakeholders
for each project or set of projects, and they make sure their interests are clearly
communicated to the program and project managers.
Project managers
The project manager is tasked with successfully implementing project
deliverables that realize the business goals. This role can best be fulfilled by a
professionally certified project manager or project executive. The project
manager might individually negotiate the budget and the time frame for
deliverables. That person might also provide a structure for the necessary tasks
and task assignments.
Enterprise IT architect
Your enterprise IT architect can play multiple roles in deployment projects. Your
enterprise IT architect can be the lead solution architect for a solution domain, or
that person might play a broader role in defining enterprise IT technology
standards.
Your enterprise IT architect typically has experience not only in enterprise
architecture but also in the skills necessary to your industry. That person might
also have other specialty skills and experiences that are relevant to the solution
design. Your enterprise IT architect has the most current understanding of
technology standards and best practices in use in your organization.
The IBM client team keeps the enterprise IT architects appraised of new
developments in IBM technologies, such as acquisitions and new product
offerings, so that our combined efforts provide the return that we are all looking
for.

Chapter 2. The IBM software deployment method
25
Project team members
The project team is typically selected by the project manager and consists of
subject matter experts (SMEs) who have the specialty skills and experiences
necessary to successfully implement the deliverables.
Consultants
Consultants are hired by your organization to provide a number of roles.
Generally speaking, the consultants are most concerned with the business goals
and the strategy for their realization. They can also provide technical guidance
and feedback for the projects.
2.2.2 IBM roles and responsibilities
In this section, we discuss the roles and responsibilities of members of the IBM
client team.
IBM client executive
The IBM client executive is the lead from the IBM side who owns the relationship
between IBM and your organization. There might be a large IBM client team for a
globally integrated account with IBM client executives in multiple geographies
and for each line of business. Alternatively, the IBM client team can be smaller
and focused on supporting only certain client locations. In all cases, the IBM
client executive has access to the full resources of IBM to help you realize your
business goals.
IBM software client leader
The IBM software client leader, previously known as the software account
manager, is responsible for all IBM software group-based solution sales in your
organization. This person holds the primary responsibility for your satisfaction
with solutions from the IBM software group.
IBM architect
This role is known by IBM account teams as a software client architect or an
industry architect. IBM client teams typically have a software client architect and
a client technical advisor assigned. The software client architect supports the
client by promoting the optimal use of deployment best practices and IBM
products and technologies as they relate to the project. When necessary, this
role can be extended to methodology and governance support.
IBM enterprise deployment manager
This role has been known as the ELA deployment manager, enterprise
deployment manager, enterprise deployment architect, and the accelerated value

26
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
leader. For several of our larger deployment clients, the IBM enterprise
deployment manager is 100% dedicated to the successful deployment of IBM
software group products with one organization. The IBM enterprise deployment
manager has access to IBM resources to help clients deploy our products.
Several of the resources are the IBM Software Support Center, IBM Passport
Advantage®, IBM Software Group lab resources, IBM proofs of technology
(PoTs), and IBM presales and delivery IBM Software Group brand technical IT
specialists.
An IBM enterprise deployment manager is a facilitator, program manager, and
customer advocate. That person represents the IBM Software Group to the
client. The primary role is to ensure the client’s success, satisfaction, and
self-sufficiency within the scope of the enterprise license agreement. The IBM
enterprise deployment manager ensures that IBM software resources, support,
and business professionals who work with the client work together collaboratively
and in a coordinated manner so that software solutions are successfully
designed and deployed with minimal risk and achievement of both business and
technical objectives of the various stakeholders. This collaboration ensures the
practical application of the IBM enterprise license agreement deployment
methodology and process, design methods, patterns, and best practices in client
initiatives.
The IBM enterprise deployment manager will:
Work directly with a dedicated customer sponsor to achieve success and
value from their enterprise license agreement investment
Coordinate and focus IBM resources necessary to execute the customer’s
vision and enable product installation and usage to achieve customer
satisfaction, success, and self-sufficiency
Ensure the successful deployment of IBM Software for projects that are using
the IBM software stack
Work on-site with the customer’s staff, and provide a single point of contact for
fulfillment of the customer’s investment in the enterprise license agreement
Working directly with customer executives to develop their business goals as
they relate to the enterprise license agreement
Be a member of relevant IT committees and boards related to Customer use
of IBM software
Monitor and escalating critical issues to IBM executives and managing
resolution
Assessing and recommending customer education, training skills
requirements, and the organizational changes that are necessary for
customer success through undertaking readiness reviews

Chapter 2. The IBM software deployment method
27
Report on Software utilization and success
Provide ongoing enablement around Software Technology updates and
capability roadmaps
Advise on IBM Worldwide Software Deployment Best Practices
Provide guidance and assistance to Customer as required in relation to and
during the roll-out and deployment of software
IBM IT specialists
The IBM IT specialist is a client-facing role that is defined for each of the major
IBM Software Group product specialties or brands (WebSphere, Information
Management, Enterprise Content Management, Commerce, Enterprise Market
Management, Lotus®, Rational® and Tivoli®). The role of the IT specialist is
typically presales but can include certain kinds of support because the IT
specialist might have the best insight into the background of a particular issue
that must be resolved for a successful deployment. Also, the IT specialist might
be involved in formulating evaluation strategies for IBM Software Group products
and assist new project team members with technical overviews of products.
2.2.3 Third-party roles and responsibilities
In this section, we discuss the roles and responsibilities of third parties.
Business partner architect
IBM developed working relationships with a multitude of qualified IBM Software
Group solution business partners. These business partners can be retained to
work directly with IBM clients to successfully deploy software-intensive solutions
and help realize the value of those assets. Very often, an IBM client executive,
client technical advisor, software client lead, software brand representative, or
software IT architect knows of qualified business partners that can assist clients
with their software deployment projects. The Business Partner architect is
typically assigned to the project and works directly with your project team to
understand the goals and requirements and put the solution design together. IBM
Business Partners receive the same training and access to information as do
employees of IBM.
2.3 Software deployment work products
When you follow the recommended software deployment method in this book,
four documents are generated in the planning of a software deployment project:
Software deployment plan

28
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
Readiness plan or plans
Software deployment tracking report
Change management or substitution report (this can be included in the
Software Deployment Tracking report)
For your projects, more than one of these documents can be used based on the
needs of the project.
2.3.1 Software deployment plan
The Software Deployment Plan provides a foundation for all other deliverables
(for example, the Software Deployment Readiness Plan and the Software
Deployment Tracking Report). This section contains an
outline
of the major
components of this deliverable:
The software deployment plan defines:
– How and when the software is included in the contract (or on the shelf from
previous contracts)
– How and when the software will be deployed
– Who is responsible for each project
– The success criteria for each project
– The success criteria for the overall contract
The software deployment plan is updated at several points during the project:
– During the creation of the initial plan
– During software deployment method tasks DM2, DM3, DM4, and DM7
The content of the software deployment plan includes:
– General information related to software deployment
– An Enterprise License Agreement, the foundational document for the
Software Deployment Plan (where applicable)
– Information that is specific to each project
Overall contract:
– Executive Business Sponsor
– Contract success criteria or expected value realization
– Projects list (on which the contract is based)
– Project plan or roadmap
Project information (for each project):
– Expected start date and end date

Chapter 2. The IBM software deployment method
29
– Identification of the Project Lead and Project Sponsor
– Project description
– Success criteria and critical success factors
– List of software products assigned to this project and quantity (optional)
– Project risks (optional)
– Methodology (optional)
2.3.2 Readiness plan
The Readiness Plan is designed to facilitate communications and deployment
planning between you and IBM. A well-executed Readiness Plan proactively
addresses implementation issues and, in turn, promotes enhanced customer
satisfaction with the IBM solution.
The Readiness Plan is a set of processes and work products that are designed to
accomplish tasks, including our plan to:
Ensure that your and our expectations are aligned
Identify issues and risks and set proper courses of action
Evaluate the software implementation skills you have in-house
Identify an education roadmap to address gaps in available skills in-house
Assign responsibilities and ownership of implementation tasks
Provide guidance in how to engage effectively with IBM support
The Readiness Plan is particularly important for projects that have critical
requirements, such as a significant scope, enterprise-wide visibility, first product
drop installation, or a service provider engagement. It is prepared by you and the
IBM technical team jointly and is outlined as follows:
Communication plan:
– Communications: Identifies the stakeholders and sponsor for internal and
external communications
– Project summary: Identifies the responsibilities and high level project
milestones
Implementation Plan:
– Statement of Work (SoW)
– Project plan
– Responsibilities
Operations Plan:
– Roles
– Backup and recovery, disaster recovery plan
– Help desk
– Systems management, availability management, logging, monitoring

30
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
Support plan:
– Problem support
– How to contact IBM
– How to identify yourself and the company
– Environment description: Platform versions, products used and versions,
architecture, and so on
– Problem description: Error code, problem description, and so on
– IBM services implementation support needs
– Technical documentation: Technical documentation for this project
Education and skills plan:
– Skills assessment, roles (implementation and operational), and education
justification
– Education plan: courses, resources, and services available for this project
– Leads to services identification and justification
– Education offerings available by the local training team
– Risk, dependencies, assumptions, and constraints
2.3.3 Software deployment tracking report
The Software Deployment Tracking Report is a deployment monitoring tool that
primarily covers:
IBM software included in the contract
Projects that have been considered during the preparation of a contract
Project leader for each project
Expected project start and end dates
IBM software planned for each project
Status of a project and IBM software deployment status
Status of purchased software licenses (on-the-shelf, assigned to a project, in
development, pilot, or production)
Contract history (for example, software substitutions) to understand changes
after the initial contract
A sample Software Deployment Tracking Report is shown in Figure 2-3 on
page 31

Chapter 2. The IBM software deployment method
31
Figure 2-3 Sample software deployment tracking report
2.3.4 Change management or substitution report
Change management is an important part of software deployment because any
change can impact the overall success criteria of the project. A change can also
affect the contract terms and conditions. Usually, less flexibility means better

32
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
commercial conditions, but if the solutions are not yet well defined, a certain
degree of flexibility in a contract is recommended to avoid the need for software
on the shelf.
The change management process must be comprehensive and clearly
documented. Each change must require a valid reason and a clearly defined
decision and impact of the decision. It can be a manual process, or it can be
supported by process automation tools, compliance, and impact management.
2.4 The software deployment method
Figure 2-4 illustrates the overall deployment method.
Figure 2-4 Depiction of the overall software deployment method
In this section, we provide a full picture of the IBM software deployment method.
We define each phase, the tasks within each phase, the roles and responsibilities
necessary to carry out each task, and the input and output of each phase.

Chapter 2. The IBM software deployment method
33
2.4.1 Prepare for deployment
The Prepare phase encompasses tasks DM0 through and including DM4.
DM0: Create the software deployment team
The purpose of this task is to:
Form the software deployment team that will plan and lead the deployment.
Obtain commitment from each member and their managers for serving on the
team.
Agree on the roles and responsibilities of team members.
Figure 2-5 depicts this task in relation to the overall software deployment method.
Figure 2-5 Task DM0 in relation to the overall software deployment method
Roles and responsibilities
The roles and responsibilities in this task are:
Executive Business Sponsor: No specific role
Program Manager: Leads this task, defines the team and the roles in the
team, approaches managers of deployment team members, and obtains
resource commitments
Procurement Officer: Agrees on a role and participates
Project Sponsor: Agrees on a role and participates
Project Manager: Agrees on a role and participates
Enterprise IT Architect: Agrees on a role and participates
Project Members: Agrees on a role and participates
IBM Client Executive: Agrees on a role and participates
IBM Enterprise Deployment Manager: Agrees on a role and participates
IBM Software Client Architect: Agrees on a role and participates
IBM IT technical resources (IT Specialists): Agree on a role and participate

34
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
Input and output products
Input and output products in this task are:
Input work products: None
Output work products: None
DM1: Review the contract content and other critical
deployment documents
When the software deployment team is defined, the team must learn about the
contract content and other items that might influence the deployment. The goal
for this task is to understand the contract content, including the terms and
conditions:
Products and quantities included in the contract
Possible replacement of products with others and under what conditions
Possible extension of the content under the same conditions
Services that will be included
“Open budget” (value basket)
1
included in the contract
Other documents must be reviewed that can have an impact on deployment. For
example, a previous deployment plan for existing software on the shelf might
need reviewing, as does Solution Review documents (also known as
Technical
and Delivery Assessment
documents), and so on. The Executive Business
Sponsor at the client site must be identified. It is also important for IBM to:
Discuss and understand your buying decisions
Obtain a preliminary view of how you define success
Determine what value you expect to gain from the partnership
Figure 2-6 depicts this task in relation to the overall software deployment method.
Figure 2-6 Task DM1 in relation to the overall software deployment method
Roles and responsibilities
The roles and responsibilities in this task are:
Executive Business Sponsor: No specific role
1
“Value basket” is terminology used in an enterprise license agreement that represents an available
budget which can be used for new product purchases or services under the predefined Terms and
Conditions of the agreement.

Chapter 2. The IBM software deployment method
35
Program Manager: Collects and manages all important documents for a
successful deployment
Others: Provide the Program Manager with documents; can impact software
deployment and enterprise license agreement
Input and output products
The input and output products in this task are:
Input products: Contract and other deployment-related documents
Output products: None
DM2: Understand the projects for deployment
In this task, the software deployment team starts developing a high-level plan in
large chunks that can be used to illustrate and justify the software purchase,
which includes:
Identifying deployment projects and mapping them to purchased software;
identifying demand gaps
Discussing your capabilities, software deployment best practices, and the
Software Deployment Readiness Plan
Identifying potential solution review requirements
Using existing enterprise architecture activities or reworking tasks to begin
developing an enterprise architecture
Determining potential services requirements
Figure 2-7 depicts this task in relation to the overall software deployment method.
Figure 2-7 Task DM2 in relation to the overall software deployment method
Roles and responsibilities
The roles and responsibilities in this task are:
Executive Business Sponsor: No specific role
Program Manager: Collects all information and documents it in a draft
Software Deployment Plan
Procurement Officer: No specific role
Project Sponsor: Provides information about specific projects
Project Manager: Provides information about specific projects

36
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
Enterprise IT Architect: Provides information about projects
Project Members: No specific role
IBM Client Executive: No specific role
IBM Enterprise Deployment Manager: No specific role
IBM Software Client Architect: No specific role
IBM IT Technical resources (IT Specialists): No specific role
Input and output products
Input and output products in this task are:
Input products: Contract
Output products: Software Deployment Plan (draft)
DM3: Finalize the software deployment plan
The software deployment plan describes the requirements of each stakeholder
and deployment project lead. With these requirements incorporated into the plan,
it is then finalized, and the details of the kick-off meeting are confirmed.
To assess the requirements of stakeholders and project leads, the following
topics are discussed, generally with each person individually:
The strategy to use for addressing open issues with the software deployment
best practices and Software Deployment Readiness Plan
Ensure that any areas of concern that were not covered in the selling process
are addressed
Confirm or update the list of key stakeholders who jointly own software
deployment with the executive business sponsor
Complete planning for deployment kick-off meeting
Figure 2-8 depicts this task in relation to the overall software deployment method.
Figure 2-8 Task DM3 in relation to the overall software deployment method
Roles and responsibilities
The roles and responsibilities in this task are:
Executive Business Sponsor: No specific role

Chapter 2. The IBM software deployment method
37
Program Manager: Collects all information and documents it in a draft
Software Deployment Plan
Procurement Officer: No specific role
Project Sponsor: Provides information about specific project
Project Manager: Provides information about specific project
Enterprise IT Architect: Provides information about projects
Project Members: No specific role
IBM Client Executive: No specific role
IBM Enterprise Deployment Manager: No specific role
IBM Software Client Architect: No specific role
IBM IT Technical resources (IT Specialists): No specific role
Input and output products
The input and output products in this task are:
Input products: Software deployment plan
Output products: Software deployment plan (final or updated)
DM4: Conduct a deployment kickoff meeting
When a software deployment plan is completed, a kickoff meeting is organized
for your Executive Business Sponsor, the key stakeholders, and the IBM software
deployment team. The purpose of this meeting is for all members to gain a
common understanding of the Software Deployment Plan, the goals that must be
achieved with the business partnership, and the criteria for success. The topics
that are discussed at this meeting are:
The vision for deployment, presented by your Executive Business Sponsor.
A high-level Software Deployment Plan, focusing on quick deployment win
projects.
Product overviews and how each product links to the software deployment
strategy.
Evangelizing and agreeing upon the Software Deployment Readiness Plan or
Plans (see “Readiness plan” on page 29), including business goals, your
communication process, training and support plans, and plans for backup and
disaster recovery, systems management, migration, rollout, service level
agreements, and dependencies.
The transition from sales close to deployment can present difficulties because
handoffs and assumptions cannot yet be communicated, and team players might
be phasing out as others are phasing in. The IBM Software client team can help

38
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
you to put a readiness plan into place that engages the appropriate client team
members so that the momentum of a successful sale carries over to deployment.
By agreeing on the contents of the Software Deployment Readiness Plan and
investing in the components of the kickoff meeting, your investment will pay
excellent dividends as you deploy. Your preparation will:
Ensure that you have the right set of expectations to successfully implement
the proposed solution
Ensure the IT system lies within the “art of the possible”
Identify issues and risks to be escalated
Figure 2-9 depicts this task in relation to the overall software deployment method.
Figure 2-9 Task DM4 in relation to the overall software deployment method
Roles and responsibilities
The roles and responsibilities in this task are:
Executive Business Sponsor: Participates in the meeting
Program Manager: Organizes the kickoff meeting and supports meeting
preparation
Procurement Officer: Supports the meeting preparation and participates
Project Sponsor: Supports the meeting preparation and participates
Project Manager: Supports the meeting preparation and participates
Enterprise IT Architect: Supports the meeting preparation and participates
Project Members: Participate in the meeting
IBM Client Executive: Participates in the meeting
IBM Enterprise Deployment Manager: Participates in the meeting
IBM Software Client Architect: Supports the meeting preparation and
participates
IBM IT Technical resources (IT Specialists): Participate in the meeting

Chapter 2. The IBM software deployment method
39
Input and output products
The input and output products in this task are:
Input products: Software deployment plan
Output products: Software deployment plan (updated), Software Deployment
Tracking Report (initial)
2.4.2 Execute the deployment plan
The Execute phase encompasses tasks DM5 through and including DM8.
DM5: Prepare and present the software deployment readiness
plan
The IBM software deployment team prepares and presents the Software
Deployment Readiness Plan or Plans based on the IBM products that are new to
your organization. This supports your initiative and ensures that you are
prepared for upcoming projects.
Figure 2-10 depicts this task in relation to the overall software deployment
method.
Figure 2-10 Task DM5 in relation to the overall software deployment method
Roles and responsibilities
The roles and responsibilities in this task are:
Executive Business Sponsor: No specific role
Program Manager: Leads the preparation of the Software Deployment
Readiness Plan
Procurement Officer: No specific role
Project Sponsor: No specific role
Project Manager: Supports the preparation of, and receives, the Software
Deployment Readiness Plan
Enterprise IT Architect: Supports the preparation of, and receives, the
Software Deployment Readiness Plan
Project Members: Receives the Software Deployment Readiness Plan

40
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
IBM Client Executive: No specific role
IBM Enterprise Deployment Manager: Supports the preparation of the
Software Deployment Readiness Plan
IBM Software Client Architect: Supports the preparation of, and receives, the
Software Deployment Readiness Plan, and prepares and executes the
Software Deployment Readiness Plan
IBM IT Technical resources (IT Specialists): Prepare and execute the
Software Deployment Readiness Plan
Input and output products
The input and output products in this task are:
Input products: None
Output products: Software Deployment Readiness Plan
DM6: Execute quick deployment wins
This important task is to execute projects that are what we call
quick deployment
wins
, as discussed in the Software Deployment Plan. A quick deployment win is
a demonstration of the capabilities and flexibilities of our deployment methods
over time. For example, you and IBM might define a 60 to 90-day project using
our products and processes to demonstrate our deployment methods. The
immediate objective here is to instill confidence in your organization about our
products and processes. As an overall objective, we want to produce a
confidence level in you, based on your seeing, first-hand, that our methods are
credible, reliable, and successful.
The key activities in this task are:
Execute quick deployment win projects
Conduct regular meetings with your project owners
Monitor the resolution of software deployment best practices and Software
Deployment Readiness Plan shortfalls
Figure 2-11 depicts this task in relation to the overall software deployment
method.
Figure 2-11 Task DM6 in relation to the overall software deployment method

Chapter 2. The IBM software deployment method
41
Roles and responsibilities
The roles and responsibilities in this task are:
Executive Business Sponsor: No specific role
Program Manager: Leads the preparation of the Software Deployment
Readiness Plan
Procurement Officer: No specific role
Project Sponsor: Supports and monitors the success of the project
Project Manager: Leads the project
Enterprise IT Architect: Provides direction and enforces standards
Project Members: Participate in implementing a project
IBM Client Executive: Validates success and satisfaction
IBM Enterprise Deployment Manager: Supports the project
IBM Software Client Architect: Supports the project
IBM IT Technical resources (IT Specialists) Support the project
Input and output products
The input and output products in this task are:
Input products: List of selected projects for deployment quick wins and the
architecture and Statement of Work (SoW) for those projects
Output products: Software Deployment Tracking Report
DM7: Execute and monitor the deployment plan
This is the longest task and, in reality, does not end because the status of the
shelf-ware from the initial contract can be used in a project from the next
contract. The purpose of this task is to help achieve the goals of the contract and
to receive maximum value from the IBM software and hardware purchase.
Monitoring the progress of the deployment along with the deployment plan must
occur regularly, perhaps monthly, or as defined. IBM support is involved in this
too in the event that there are issues or potential issues. If there are changes to
the project plan, project content, or owners, immediately update the software
deployment plan accordingly. The success of software and hardware deployment
also depends on technical and other issues that are faced by the implementation
team during the course of the project. Therefore, the software deployment team
must fully support the resolution of project issues.

42
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
When starting a new project, it is important to understand what will occur if:
A solution review needs to be executed
An additional Software Deployment Readiness Plan needs to be prepared
based on project content changes
When a project is completed, it must be ensured and verified that all project
goals are met, at which time the Software Tracking Report is updated.
Figure 2-12 depicts this task in relation to the overall software deployment
method.
Figure 2-12 Task DM7 in relation to the overall software deployment method
Roles and responsibilities
The roles and responsibilities in this task are:
Executive Business Sponsor: Supports and drives any escalation and
supports problem resolution during the project
Program Manager: Monitors the software deployment progress against the
plan, identifies needs, and leads the solution review and the Software
Deployment Readiness Plan. Leads (together with a Project Manager and the
IBM Enterprise Deployment Manager) problem resolution of technical and
other issues
Procurement Officer: Controls license use
Project Sponsor: Supports and monitors project success
Project Manager: Leads projects and manages problem resolution
Enterprise IT Architect: Provides direction and enforces standards
Project Members: Perform project implementation, if agreed to with the client,
and provides input on deployment progress to the Deployment Technical
Lead, where applicable
IBM Client Executive: Supports and drives any escalation and supports
problem resolution during the project
IBM Enterprise Deployment Manager: Leads solution review and the
Software Deployment Readiness Plan. Co-leads (together with a Program
Manager and Project Manager) problem resolution of technical and other
issues

Chapter 2. The IBM software deployment method
43
IBM Software Client Architect: Supports the project
IBM IT Technical resources (IT Specialists): Supports the project
Input and output products
The input and output products in this task are:
Input products: Software deployment plan, Software Deployment Tracking
Report
Output products: Software deployment plan (updated), Software Deployment
Tracking Report (updated)
DM8: Manage project and solution changes
Multiple changes can occur during project execution, which can influence project
priorities and the utilization of purchased hardware and software licenses. Any
change requires impact analysis, an investment protection plan for purchased
hardware and software, a clear definition of additional needs, and an update to
the software deployment plan.
Figure 2-13 depicts this task in relation to the overall software deployment
method.
Figure 2-13 Task DM8 in relation to the overall software deployment method
Roles and responsibilities
The roles and responsibilities in this task are:
Executive Business Sponsor: No specific role
Program Manager: Controls and documents changes
Procurement Officer: Controls license use
Project Sponsor: No specific role
Project Manager: Manages changes and the impact of changes on the project
and overall costs
Enterprise IT Architect: Provides direction and enforces standards; updates
and manages the Enterprise Architecture
Project Members: Provide suggestions
IBM Client Executive: Supports changes with commercial conditions

44
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
IBM Enterprise Deployment Manager: Manages the IBM client team to
provide recommendations for potential changes
IBM Software Client Architect: Supports the project and provides
recommendations
IBM IT Technical resources (IT Specialists): Support the project and provide
recommendations
Input and output products
The input and output products in this task are:
Input work products: None
Output work products: Software deployment plan (updated), Software
Deployment Tracking Report (updated), Change Management or Substitution
report
2.4.3 Measure deployment success
In this section, we discuss the Measure phase, which contains one major task.
DM9: Measure deployment success
Software deployment success must be monitored, measured, and communicated
to the stakeholders frequently. Therefore, the topic of how return on investment
(ROI) is realized must be determined. Software deployment goes beyond known
projects that are defined in the selling cycle. It is important that the executive
business sponsors and stakeholders realize value, which, in turn, increases
business.
Figure 2-14 depicts this task in relation to the overall software deployment
method.
Figure 2-14 Task DM9 in relation to the overall software deployment method
Roles and responsibilities
The roles and responsibilities in this task are:
Executive Business Sponsor: Validates the success of the deployment
Program Manager: Validates the success of the deployment
Procurement Officer: Controls license use of shelfware

Chapter 2. The IBM software deployment method
45
Project Sponsor: Validates project success
Project Manager: Provides input to determine success of the project
Enterprise IT Architect: Monitors Enterprise Architecture key performance
indicators (KPIs)
Project Members: Provide input to determine success of the project
IBM Client Executive: Validates success of the deployment
IBM Enterprise Deployment Manager: Provides input to determine success of
the project
IBM Software Client Architect: Provides input to determine success of the
project
IBM IT Technical resources (IT Specialists): Provide input to determine
success of the project
Input and output products
The input and output products in this task are:
Input products: Software deployment plan
Output products: Value Realization document

46
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2011. All rights reserved.
47
Chapter 3.
Accelerating software
deployment using best
practices
3

48
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
3.1 What this chapter is about
This chapter describes the best practices for software deployment that IBM uses.
It complements “The software deployment method” on page 32. The concept of
best practices is complemented by other software deployment offerings that IBM
provides, such as engaging services teams, conducting software deployment
workshops, conducting readiness plans, and much more, as illustrated in this
book.
Our best practices were tested over time and have proven, historically, to be
successful in a variety of industries and organizational structures. When adhered
to consistently throughout the process of software deployment, value realization
was achieved.
This chapter illustrates the successful application of these best practices by
providing case studies, some fictitious and some based upon actual events. For
those best practices that are based on actual events, the names of the
organizations are not included for reasons of confidentiality. In all case studies in
this chapter, the clients used the Software Deployment Method discussed in 2.4,
“The software deployment method” on page 32 in addition to the software
deployment best practices that we discuss in this chapter.
3.1.1 Case study
HIC Corporation (HIC) is an insurance company that focuses on a wide range of
insurance products. Their operating strategy is to provide the highest value to
consumers through multiple channels. In the current fiscal year, HIC reported
revenue of over USD40 billion. HIC made an enterprise-wide purchase of
software from IBM. Early in the deployment phase, they recognized the need for
a structured method to deploy their software and turned to IBM for assistance.
Soon after signing an Enterprise License Agreement (ELA) with IBM, HIC
recognized the need for a single owner for the ELA. The responsibility of the
owner was to ensure the successful deployment of the software purchased in the
ELA. The Chief Information Officer (CIO) of the organization placed the HIC Vice
President of Architecture for Technical Services in the role of Executive Business
Sponsor (ESB).
The first step was to identify a team of IT managers to assist with identifying a
deployment strategy for HIC. IBM already had sales and technical sales
representatives in place. These two groups, when combined, created the
Software Deployment Team (see “DM0: Create the software deployment team”
on page 33). Functioning as one team, HIC and IBM focused on ensuring the
success of the ELA.

Chapter 3. Accelerating software deployment using best practices
49
The Software Deployment Team quickly defined a high-level deployment plan
that identified a long-term view of deployment direction. The Software
Deployment Team also defined quick deployment wins, five products from the
ELA that deploy immediately. These quick wins were to be delivered in the near
term to build confidence and generate excitement about the technology and
solutions, while supporting business objectives.
The leader of the ELA deployment team at HIC identified solution and product
captains for the helm of each quick deployment win. Their responsibilities were to
define and execute a realistic plan to use the software in at least one pilot project
and to build the infrastructure to support the use of the quick deployment win
software in future projects. In addition, they were to communicate and market
these successes within HIC Technical Services.
To facilitate this communication and marketing effort, the ELA deployment team
at HIC devised an event entitled Enterprise Agreement Land (EA Land). EA Land
was organized to allow the product and solution captains to highlight their team’s
achievements during the first eight months of the ELA deployment process.
Along with product tables and two demo rooms that were staffed by HIC and
vendor representatives, process tables were included, such as quality
assurance, information architecture, and solution services. This ensured that the
excitement about the products in the ELA generated by EA Land did not
overwhelm the process of deployment at HIC. Over 1,200 HIC IT professionals
were invited to this event.
Because HIC focused on planning, communication, and several other principles
that we highlight in this chapter, several early successes from their ELA
deployment efforts were achieved. Along the way, as part of their enterprise
architecture initiative, they also successfully designed and implemented a
process to help ensure successful software deployments in the future. This
process was made formal by the governance body they set up.
IBM is involved with deployments conducted with partners from multiple
industries, globally. The IBM best practices discussed in this chapter are proven
to ensure the highest probability of success. We saw what works and learned
what fails amid the variables in software deployment today.
The authors of this Redbooks publication used the software deployment best
practices discussed herein with multiple customers. For this publication, we
tailored these best practices to IT organizations. You are invited to use and
customize these best practice techniques based on the individual requirements
of your organization.

50
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
3.2 Best practices
We begin with the primary best practices that form the framework of our
approach. These best practices are suitable for implementation in any software
deployment process because they address the focal business challenges of
successful, efficient software deployment. These primary best practices are as
follows, in the order in which they are generally carried out:
1.Identify the executive business sponsor and stakeholders.
2.Define a governance structure for the deployment process.
3.Centralize software fulfillment and license management tools.
4.Engage consulting and implementation services.
5.Define your return on investment (ROI) strategy and time to value.
6.Conduct workshops to assure deployment readiness:
a.Conduct a deployment kickoff immediately after the contract is signed.
b.Conduct a software deployment workshop.
7.Identify strong project and resource management.
8.Commit to self-sufficiency.
9.Communicate and market the vision.
Many of the best practices outlined in this chapter are integrated into the process
for software deployment detailed in 2.4, “The software deployment method” on
page 32. However, even if you are not following the proposed process, consider
using these practices to provide the best opportunity for achieving value from
your software. The importance of using and adhering to best practices is a
fundamental part of the process of software deployment, which your organization
can do independently or in concert with the IBM client team.
3.2.1 Identifying an executive business sponsor and stakeholders
The achievement of your business goals is the foremost objective. One avenue
toward meeting this objective is the identification of an executive business
sponsor at the start of the project, who serves as the central point of contact from
your side. For the executive business sponsor, the ability to clearly communicate
the needs of each team is crucial. Ownership can be at several levels, for
example, there might be a high-level executive business sponsor and several
tiers of sponsorship beneath them.
IBM wants to build a strong partnership with you for the duration of this project
and beyond, and so communication between your team and IBM is a first priority.
We identify a person on our team who has the same responsibility from our

Chapter 3. Accelerating software deployment using best practices
51
perspective. Let us discuss the responsibilities of the executive business sponsor
in more detail.
In most organizations, ownership of overall deployment success can be at
several levels, for example, an IT might delegate additional sponsorship to your
direct reports. Another IT executive might delegate sub-sponsorship to separate
lines of business. In most modern businesses with so much going on each day,
these changes are not communicated to all who need to know. The executive
business sponsor serves this need. No matter what processes are put into place
or changes initiated, the executive business sponsor is the key contact.
It is with the executive business sponsor that deployment objectives are defined
early on and with whom every success is expected and celebrated.
How do you go about selecting the most qualified person to represent your
team? To demonstrate the importance of this task, we share our experiences
with teams that did not follow the recommendation to identify an executive
business sponsor. They usually find that their software deployment team cannot
adequately control projects or manage changes. Similarly, we found that teams
who do identify an executive business sponsor oftentimes identify a person
without the necessary skills. If this occurs, be confident that we are in this
business partnership to assist you, to work together with the common goal of
making the team as efficient as possible. The executive business sponsor and
the entire client team must have support contact numbers available. You can
work with your IBM contact to develop a support roadmap, by brand.
Case study
The Chief Information Officer (CIO) of a major insurance company in the United
States personally assumes ownership of their software agreement to drive their
deployment projects. That person delegates the day-to-day responsibilities to
various project managers on the staff and maintains involvement with monthly
status updates. Any inhibitors to their success are quickly dealt with so as not to
impact their overall plans. Not only does the involvement of the CIO help to avoid
surprises, it also ensures that the vision is continuously delivered and reinforced.
Software packages, sometimes for a multitude of business projects, must be
received, logged, distributed, and tracked. We give you the option to receive
software from CDs or download them directly from our Passport Advantage
online website. This process is usually continuous until the software entitlements
expire.
Over time, the individuals or groups who need to receive software will likely
change. It is important for you to initiate a centralized software fulfillment process
as early as possible in the deployment life cycle. The key element of this process
is having one person in your company who is responsible for receiving and
downloading all software, logging its receipt, distributing it to those who need it,

52
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
and tracking what is delivered. If it is not feasible to initiate this process within
your company, consider contacting your IBM client team to explore the option of
using an IBM Business Partner for assistance. As one executive, a client, said,
“The recommendation that one owner be defined for the successful deployment
of software has been extremely beneficial.” (GMR Corporation, VP of Technical
Services, an IBM Business Partner).
3.2.2 Defining a governance structure for the deployment process
The executive business sponsor and the software deployment team executives
must establish a Center of Excellence to put rigor around deployment projects.
This type of organization can facilitate each deployment at multiple phases in the
deployment life cycle. While kicking off a deployment, a Center of Excellence
provides an internal organization and a group of professionals who can increase
the buy-in and willingness of other organizations to use the purchased software
and hardware. This can be done with presentations, demonstrations, and Proofs
of Concept (PoC) (see Appendix 4.4.2, “Client lab advocacy program” on
page 94) during the deployment of software and hardware.
Many individuals from your organization, and those from IBM and our Business
Partners, must work together on the Center of Excellence team to ensure
successful software deployment. Typically, a Center of Excellence team includes
the roles in the following list, which are defined in “Software deployment roles in a
business partnership” on page 22:
The client team:
– Business Sponsor
– Project Sponsors
– Project managers
– Enterprise IT Architect
– Procurement Officer
The IBM software client team:
– Client Executives
– Software Client Leaders
– Specialist Software Sales Representative
– IBM Software Client Architects
– Client Technical Professionals from various IBM software and hardware
brands
– Services representatives, for example, from IBM Global Services, the
Server Technology Group, Global Technology Services, and IBM Software

Chapter 3. Accelerating software deployment using best practices
53
Services (also known as IBM Software Group Lab Services), education,
support, and so on
Third parties:
– Third-party Project Managers
– Third-party Architect
– IBM Business Partners assisting in administrative or deployment functions
The Center of Excellence team must meet at least bi-weekly to develop software
deployment strategies, to review software deployment progress, and to define
and manage company-wide initiatives.
Additionally, the Center of Excellence facilitates sharing of skills, experiences,
and resources across multiple projects. It accelerates and improves the quality of
the entire deployment process and provides one central place for IBM software
expertise to visit and to assist, when needed.
3.2.3 Centralizing software fulfillment and license management
This discussion focuses on the two primary steps in demonstrating deployment
readiness:
Centralizing software fulfillment
Implementing a license management tool.
Step one: Centralizing software fulfillment
Buying a software agreement is not like buying, for example, a car. It is not one
single entity that the customer buys. Rather, with a software agreement, you
purchase a license to use a multitude of software packages that you download
from the IBM Passport Advantage website (see “License acquisition and
entitlement with Passport Advantage” on page 90 and “Software support
offerings from IBM” on page 144). To maximize deployment activity, the delivery
of software is continuous until the contract expires. The list of customers who are
scheduled to receive software changes over time.
The executive business sponsor must centralize the software fulfillment process
as early as possible in the deployment life cycle. That way, one party in the
company is responsible for downloading all software in the ELA, logging its
receipt, distributing it to those who need it, and tracking what is delivered. This
can mean that the responsibility for all aspects of deployment are scattered
across a wide range of departments, businesses, and processes, which can be a
significant inhibitor to rapid deployment success. Therefore, instituting a
centralized software fulfillment service is crucial for compliance reasons, as
discussed in “Step two: Implementing a license management tool and processes
for use” on page 54 and “License acquisition and entitlement with Passport

54
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
Advantage” on page 90. If it is not feasible to initiate this process within your
organization, consider contacting your IBM client team to explore the option of
using an IBM Business Partner for assistance.
Step two: Implementing a license management tool and
processes for use
Just as it is crucial to institute centralized software fulfillment service in your
organization, we found that a specific system of license management is crucial
as well. Why? In this age of distributed computing, departmental projects, and
company locations that span the globe, it is important to understand where your
investments are and how they are being used.
You might have contractual obligations to report on software use or over use;
alternately, you might use this information internally to manage costs or charge
backs. Implementing a complete process with the appropriate tools allows you to
clearly understand your software usage. License management involves
identifying software by its phase-of-use:
The licenses that to be installed
The licenses that are actually installed
The licenses that are actively being used
The number of licenses that are forecasted to be installed
Performing effective license management requires a combination of tools and
processes. Many companies tried to accomplish this task on paper, with
spreadsheets, or using e-mails. This tracking typically addresses only the first
phase of license management, that is, the licenses to be installed. An equally
critical stage is tracking what software licenses are actually installed and used
because departments are charged for the software distributed to their
community, whether or not it is being used. Good record keeping and license
management techniques for your software collection and its use ensures that
software is purchased at the required levels. This can also be enlightening as to
what value is being derived from the software that is intended to grow business.
By having a centralized license management tool, you address the issue of
compliance. A software audit, either manual or with an inventory tool, can
discover widespread installation of software in the organization. In fact, software
is often not removed, consuming valuable disk space, or it is installed and later
forgotten. An inventory can be used for budgeting software licensing and
maintenance. You might realize that you have paid more than necessary to
maintain unused licenses. Finally, factor in your projected deployments if you are
using the data for budgeting purposes.
In the discussion of deployment tools in this book
1
, we discuss tools, including
the IBM License Metric Tool, the Tivoli License Manager, and the IBM Enterprise

Chapter 3. Accelerating software deployment using best practices
55
Software Management Tool. These are innovative web solutions that are
designed to help you manage large, complex software license contracts more
efficiently and more effectively, and they can be used for license management.
You can also use IBM Business Partners or a homegrown process or system to
track license utilization. The Enterprise Software Management tool is a secure,
online self-service tool that is readily adaptable to a variety of internal business
processes. It is fully scalable, so it is flexible enough to keep up with rapid
changes in business. With the same entry point for both parties, you and IBM
have an up-to-date snapshot of the status of all of your IBM license and other
software entitlements.
The key point is that IBM must enforce more strictly the need for you to report
software use. The contract specifies that this is your responsibility. Not doing so
can lead to a full audit of your environment by IBM or a third-party consultant.
For more information about the topic of license management tools, refer to
“License acquisition and entitlement with Passport Advantage” on page 90. Case
study
Case study
A leading health care provider in the United States partnered with IBM and their
software partner to develop an electronic software delivery system. This system
ensures that software is available to their users and tracked for accounting
purposes. Not only can users request authorization and download software
electronically, but the system also produces a scheduled management report to
the procurement office. This type of innovation alleviates the burden of managing
software media, provides the tracking needed to demonstrate software utilization,
and reduces company operations costs.
This customer has a contractual obligation to report software usage (refer to your
ELA and Passport Advantage agreement for details). While the IBM Software
Group takes a soft approach to enforcing this policy, it is important for the
customer to think about the concept of license tracking and management for both
limited and unlimited licenses.
3.2.4 Engaging consulting and implementation services
Our most successful customers frequently engage IBM deployment services to
augment their local expertise. Our services professionals are familiar with the
products and can start planning and implementing your solutions immediately.
They can also be helpful in providing training to your staff, which reduces the
time you need to reach self sufficiency.
1
Refer to “Tools” on page 71

56
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
Your IBM client team gets involved with many services engagements and can
help you determine what is needed for your unique situation. If you decide not to
use an external services organization, realize that your time-to-value might be
delayed further than desired. We are here to train your staff to integrate and
fine-tune the new technology in line with your existing environment and gain
value from the software purchased to address the business challenge. Little
worthwhile business software is self-installing, self-calibrating, or
self-maintaining. You have highly skilled technologists employed, but, while they
are working on core business, when will they have time to deploy the new
technology and support core business? This deployment best practice causes
you to consider their requirements for parallel or redundant resources for the
duration of deployment. It is important to have IBM Services involved early in the
solution design cycle, where you might not have existing expertise in your
organization and where you welcome the approach from IBM Services.
Preferably, IBM Services can be engaged in the pre-sales steps of the
engagement and continue to work with you on the implementation details. The
IBM Services team will:
Assess the deployment projects that are scheduled to begin after the
agreement closes.
Conduct a skills gap analysis with you and recommend appropriate IBM
Services engagements.
Refer to our discussion about engaging IBM Services organizations
2
.
3.2.5 Defining your return on investment strategy and time-to-value
It is up to you to determine and communicate how you will calculate and measure
value. This calculation is typically stated as return on investment (ROI) with the
time frame for that return known as the time-to-value. There are generally two
types of ROI used:
Soft ROI: This includes such examples as better monitoring or control
capabilities, transformation of IT or business processes, implementation of a
strategic vision, and the adoption of a common look and feel.
Hard ROI: This includes such examples as head count savings, system count
reduction, server consolidation, department or process closures, and
outsourcing.
You or the executive business sponsor can work with the IBM Software Client
team to define the ROI and map a timeline with
value milestones
. Revisit the
milestones at least quarterly to ensure that the deployment is moving forward
2
Refer to Chapter 5, “Using IBM Services to complement your skills and accelerate value” on
page 113

Chapter 3. Accelerating software deployment using best practices
57
effectively and delivering the intended results. Refer to 1.4, “Value realization” on
page 8 for more information about this topic.
3.2.6 Conducting workshops to assure deployment readiness
A key event that helps to launch a large deployment effort is hosting a workshop
that initiates the deployment process. We call this deployment kickoff meeting.
This meeting generally takes place soon after the software sales agreement is
closed, and can be followed by a two to five-day software deployment workshop,
which usually occurs in later stages of deployment. It is beneficial to conduct this
workshop when you have trouble with software deployment, in case you
purchased a lot of software that is not yet deployed and need guidance in taking
advantage of your purchase. Thus, you can use any one of the workshops,
depending on your requirements.
During the workshops, follow the guidance and practices of the software
deployment method. This document serves as a guide for documented, proven,
repeatable software deployment practices that, when followed, maximize your
probability of deployment success. We discuss this method in 2.4, “The software
deployment method” on page 32.
The key to deriving value from software deployed within a software purchase
contract is the adherence of the IBM team to this method (a common roadmap),
which keeps the team on the same page and helps them to look and act as a
team when they interact with you.
Step one: Conducting a deployment kickoff meeting
This event introduces your stakeholders to the purchased products. It is also an
opportunity to describe how the products fit into your vision. This is a good time
to review software deployment best practices. In addition, review any
expectations that were set and the criteria that will be used to measure value
realization. This is a good start to guide and plan for successful deployment of
software for multiple projects.
The time invested will pay excellent dividends as you deploy. See also “DM4:
Conduct a deployment kickoff meeting” on page 37.
Step two: Conducting a software deployment workshop
A software deployment workshop, generally two-to-five days in duration, was
designed to help you build the internal plan, skills, and processes that are
necessary to realize success from your IBM software purchase. It is conducted

58
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
with the software deployment method and software best practices in mind and
specifically designed for you and your stakeholders. If you seek answers to any of
the following questions, you can benefit from the workshop:
What business or IT goals are you hoping to accomplish by this software
purchase?
How will success and value be measured?
What are the timelines and major milestone plans?
What deployment projects can be accomplished in the next six to nine months
that can produce quick deployment wins to gain confidence?
Is there a person or persons, across lines of business, who are responsible
for realizing full value from purchased software?
Who will deploy software and handle knowledge transfer to your team?
What personnel skills and experience gaps do you think can impact the
deployment progress?
How is education delivered today (classroom, web)?
What internal matters (politics, factions, geographies, languages, cultures)
exist that can impact deployment mindshare, buy-in, and progress?
Across all lines of business, and within departments, how will the vision be
articulated, the goals communicated, success advertised, and potential
challenges averted? At the workshop, we will work with you to set the right
expectations, provide pre-workshop collateral, and offer follow-up suggestions
to keep the momentum of deployment high. The workshop will:
– Introduce the software deployment method
– Determine what it means to plan for success
– Identify quick deployment wins that will build confidence and momentum
– Introduce the IBM Software Client team and review our core
responsibilities
– Step through deployment best practices and the deployment readiness
plan, and identify any gaps
– Identify action plans to address identified gaps
– Define value and determine how and when it will be realized
– Sketch and discuss a high-level deployment plan that will achieve
business goals
– Schedule a follow-up meeting to monitor progress
This workshop is conducted as a best practice and follows the software
deployment method. Depending on your preferences, you can conduct a

Chapter 3. Accelerating software deployment using best practices
59
workshop or IBM can conduct it. To arrange for a software deployment workshop
for your team, contact your Software Client Leader from IBM.
Case study
To facilitate communication and marketing efforts, the Enterprise Agreement
Deployment team at HIC devised an event entitled EA Land, which was
organized to allow the project leads to highlight their teams’ achievements during
the first eight months of ELA deployment work. To realize the true value of
purchased software, the executive business sponsor gathered the professionals
who were involved with deployment projects and organized them into groups.
They were charged with addressing key questions across multiple lines of
business. They were responsible for realizing the full value from the purchased
software and hardware. During the workshop, they discussed and addressed the
questions listed in“Step two: Conducting a software deployment workshop” on
page 57.
3.2.7 Identifying strong project and resource management
To successfully deploy projects that address your business needs, you need a
strong project manager. There are a number of aspects in the deployment of the
projects to consider, such as which tasks are being carried out by whom and how
deployment tasks come together under one umbrella. The question for you is,
“Do I have the needed resources and skills for success, and, if not, should I
recruit these resources from within the organization or hire from the outside?”
3.2.8 Committing to self-sufficiency
The goal of your IBM Software Client team is to decrease the level of involvement
from IBM over time as you progress through your deployment plan. This is
accomplished through a well-designed education plan that develops subject
matter experts (SMEs) within your own organization for the solutions being
implemented. You can kick start this by hiring deployment services, or you can
develop in-house expertise.
3.2.9 Communicating and market the vision
Your software partners and vendors are capable marketers of their products, they
are not in the best position to market your vision. Therefore, the business drivers
behind a software purchase are often not communicated within a company.
Sometimes it is the inventory of software purchased but not deployed that is
forgotten. This internal marketing and communication can be led by the executive
business sponsor to create demand, interest, and promote success.

60
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
Like the steady beat of a drum, communications must continue throughout the
life of the deployment to market and surface deployment opportunities and areas
for improvement. The software deployment team is charged with monitoring
deployment progress and recommending adjustments in the communication
plan.
In general, keep those who need to know informed about the progress or
inhibiting factors of the deployment. An example of communications can be a
newsletter or intranet web site that keeps management and end users informed
about recent accomplishments, milestones, and improvements. It is important to
promote and validate the results of deployment often and to as many audiences
as possible to maintain momentum and excitement. An example of how
continued communication can promote success is in the 3.1.1, “Case study” on
page 48, from which we quote:
“Because HIC focused on planning, communication, and several other
principles highlighted in this chapter, several early successes from their EA
deployment efforts were achieved. Along the way, they also successfully
designed and implemented a process that would help to ensure successful
software deployments in the future.”

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2011. All rights reserved.
61
Chapter 4.
Accelerating software
deployment using tools and
assets
4

62
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
4.1 What this chapter is about
Planning IT projects and tracking the progress and performance of them is
crucial for successfully achieving value realization of software licenses. The
planning aspect includes:
Setting priorities and determining a project roadmap and dependencies
Defining the needs for project implementation (for example, hardware,
software, resources, and skills) and operation with a strong focus on
optimization
Defining governance and key performance indicators (KPIs) to ensure that
each initiative is moving in the right direction
Realizing plans, which includes:
– Building a project roadmap by defining project priorities, dependencies,
the major implementation considerations (for example, hardware,
software, resources, and skills), and the operations process
– Maintaining a strong focus on optimization
– Governance and key performance indicators (KPIs) to ensure that each
initiative is moving in the right direction
Realization of deployment plans is also important, which includes:
Project and portfolio performance tracking to ensure that projects are
progressing and delivering value realization as planned
Resource, asset and license management tracking to support the optimized
use of hardware, software and human resources
Change management governance and tools to support changes in business
and technical needs
There are several methods, tools, and best practices that are used by many
clients that can help organizations plan and track their IT investments, including
software licenses. More details regarding best practices and tools is in
Chapter 2, “The IBM software deployment method” on page 19. We recommend
that you review that chapter in addition to this chapter. The most important of
these are discussed in this chapter, which are:
Enterprise architecture (EA) and portfolio management. EA provides a
structured approach for aligning business and IT in terms of priorities and
performance management, optimization and standardization of the
organization and processes, and IT and transition planning.
Project management is required to adequately manage, plan, and track
projects.

Chapter 4. Accelerating software deployment using tools and assets
63
License and Compliance management, discussed in “License and
compliance management” on page 70, is necessary for tracking and
managing software licenses.
Change Management, discussed in “Change management” on page 70, is
required to manage change requests.
We conclude this chapter with a discussion about tools for tracking and planning.
4.2 Enterprise architecture and portfolio management
In this section, we discuss Enterprise architecture, including portfolio
management and how these disciplines can help in realizing value by successfull
deployment of software.
4.2.1 Introduction to EA and portfolio management
Enterprise Architecture is a business and IT architecture framework, a blueprint
that aligns business initiatives to IT. As such, EA is the integration point between
business and IT, serving as the catapult that accelerates the delivery of IT
solutions.
Figure 4-1 on page 64 illustrates the concept of EA at a high level, where EA is
the link between strategy (business) and system design (IT).
IBM Enterprise Architecture method: There are several EA methods
available on the market including the IBM Enterprise Architecture method,
which was developed through several client engagements. This document is
not describing a specific EA Method, but it looks more at how Enterprise
Architecture, as a concept, can help improve the software deployment
success.

64
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
Figure 4-1 High level view of EA, integrating strategy (business), and system design (IT)
EA defines the architectural models, governance, and transition initiatives that
are needed to effectively coordinate the stakeholders’ drive toward the overall
goal of increasing efficiency and lowering costs. Figure 4-2 on page 65 illustrates
the components of these initiatives.
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Classically, we’ve defined EA as the “planning” function between
strategy formulation and delivery…

Chapter 4. Accelerating software deployment using tools and assets
65

Figure 4-2 The architecture, governance, and transition perspectives of EA
IBM is one of the leaders in Enterprise Architecture with long history and
experience. Enterprise Architecture best practices are consolidated in the IBM
Enterprise Architecture Method, which provides guidance about
how
to
implement Enterprise Architecture in an organization,
not
just what must be
defined.
4.2.2 What is the EA process?
The EA process is an iterative process. Every successful project has the
potential to change the existing architecture, possibly forming gaps, and
therefore needs a transition process, as depicted in Figure 4-3 on page 66.
IBM Global Business Services
Enterprise Architecture
Enterprise Architecture
Architecture
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Three aspects of enterprise architecture

66
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
Figure 4-3 Primary components of the EA process
EA is primarily about:
Doing the right things (Upstream EA): Identifying, funding, and resourcing the
most important programs in line with the business strategy, within budget, in
the right sequence, and with effective program management and control.
Doing the things right (Downstream EA): Ensuring that the solutions delivered
by these programs meet the needs of the business, work within the existing IT
environment, and contribute to the realization of the IT strategy of the
enterprise.
4.2.3 IT portfolio management in EA governance
The principal purpose of IT portfolio management is to define project and
program priorities in terms of IT investments. The goal is to provide the best
method for achieving business goals and measuring performance. IBM uses one
of the key components of IT portfolio management, EA governance, to define
these priorities.
IBM Global Business Services
…helping the enterprise create the right set of architectural,
governance and transition planning materials
Transition
Strategic Gap
Analysis
Technology
Architecture
Enterprise
Capabilities
Business
Architecture
IS Architecture
Current
Environment
Emerging
Opportunities
Governance
Client
Objectives
Proposal and Engagement Planning

Chapter 4. Accelerating software deployment using tools and assets
67
EA governance defines the metrics, measurement, and monitoring of the
investment, as compared with the value derived from projects, applications, and
technologies. IT portfolio management provides an important base for defining
project, application, and technology life cycle governance, as Figure 4-4 shows.
Figure 4-4 IT Portfolio management in EA governance
IT Portfolio management defines a sequence (project or program roadmap) of
projects and programs and dependencies between them. With the prioritization
and roadmaps completed, each project and program must be managed properly
to achieve the defined goals.
IT portfolio management is accomplished successfully by managing three
portfolios:
Application portfolio: The application portfolio takes into account the cost of
existing software, whether purchased, licensed, or developed in-house. All
expenses are considered, including development (if applicable), upgrades,
licensing, and maintenance. Management of the application portfolio focuses
on comparing the spending for the application with the relative value of the
software to the organization. The comparison can be based on the level of
contribution in terms of IT investment profitability, or less tangible factors (for

68
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
example, existing skills), that can be measured using soft skills measurement
techniques.
Infrastructure management: Infrasucture management refers to the
operational components of the enterprise that primarily impact Quality of
Service (QoS) and the overall effectiveness of the IT infrastructure. These
operational components include system management, network management,
security management, and storage management. For each of these areas, we
analyze the policies, processes, equipment, data, human resources, and
external contacts that make up the infrastructure.
We strongly support the creation of the infrastructure portfolio, based on our
experience with organizations that overlook this important component of
portfolio management. Often, in the rush to reduce costs, increase IT quality,
and increase competitiveness by selectively choosing sources and services,
organizations that overlook this portfolio realize overpayments, cost overruns,
unmet expectations, and failure.
Project portfolio: This type of portfolio management focuses on prioritizing
new projects based on value, urgency, project dependencies, and the
availability of resources. This portfolio provides a framework for the project
roadmap.
4.2.4 The value of enterprise architecture and portfolio management
in software deployment
There are several commonalities between planning for EA and planning for
software deployment:
Both align IT to business goals and value
Both define a technology gap between current and future states
Both define a transition plan (business and technical project roadmap)
IBM developed a light version of the enterprise architecture, illustrated in
Figure 4-5 on page 69, with a focus on IT infrastructure planning and value
realization. It has been used in the preparation of many IBM enterprise license
agreements with the content preparation and content business justification.

Chapter 4. Accelerating software deployment using tools and assets
69
Figure 4-5 The IBM EA Light process
The process starts with the definition of business goals and the value associated
with each goal. Usually, several projects are identified that help to achieve these
business goals. The team must provide a project roadmap, based on project
complexity, needs, available resources, and project dependencies. Each project
generates an IT solution with an appropriate architecture. The next step in the
optimization process is the consolidation of solution architectures using
component standardization
in the target architecture. Component re-use
between multiple projects and solutions is important because it produces:
Lower SW license costs because the same license can be used for multiple
solutions
Lower administration and maintenance costs because fewer components
need to be managed and maintained
Lower integration costs and faster integration
The target architecture contains the existing components (hardware and
software) and new components. The gap between the “as is” and the target (“to
be”) architectures generates a list of hardware and software components needed
Business
Justi fi cation
Resource
Deployment
Plan
Har dware
Deployment
Plan
Budget
Plan
Software
Depl oyment
Plan
Target Ar chitectur e
Servi ces Hardware Software
Contract Business Value
Value 1
Value 2
Value 3
Value 4
Architect ure 1
Architect ure 2
Architect ure 3
Architect ure 4
Project 1
Project 2
Project 3
Project 4
BUSINESS VALUE / GOALS
PROJECTS
PROJECT ROADMAP
Education
Implementation

70
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
to establish the target architecture and the services needed for implementation,
support and skills transfer.
The list of hardware, software, and services can be associated with the project
roadmap with the following output:
Hardware deployment plan: The timing for each hardware component to be
installed and operational
Software deployment plan (roadmap): The software implementation schedule,
based on the project plan and software requirements for each project
Resource deployment plan: The resource activity plan, based on hardware
and software implementation plans
For each project in the solution, and for the solution overall, the contract must
provide value to the business. Map the solution components to the function and
value of the project and business goals to provide a good model for justifying new
components and for measuring the value of them.
4.2.5 License and compliance management
License and compliance management provides:
License Management: Real-time monitoring and reporting on license use by
an organization or segment of the organization
Compliance Management: A comparison of licenses purchased with licenses
used enables you to understand which ones and how many licenses are still
available and if the organization is software-license compliant.
There are several tools available for monitoring software license use and
software compliance.
License and compliance management is extremely important in complex
software deployment projects. It enables you to be aware of software license
purchases and use. It also makes you aware of potential software license
substitutions, where applicable (see Appendix A, “The IBM Enterprise License
Agreement” on page 187).
Change management
Changes happen frequently when a deployment project is running. In long-term,
strategic projects, a multitude of changes can be expected. Changes to the
original project plan are needed because of changes in business priorities,
technologies, and other factors that were not considered or that changed. Each
change in project priority, scope, architecture, or plan can have multiple

Chapter 4. Accelerating software deployment using tools and assets
71
implications on overall project performance. Therefore, they must be identified
and managed to achieve the business goals as initially defined.
Change management can have a tremendous impact on software deployment
success. This includes changes in licensing needs (for example, a change in
project priority or architecture), resources and skills, and changes in the overall
project justification.
4.2.6 Addtional tools
Tools that IBM uses in planning and tracking software deployment projects are:
Enterprise architecture management
(http://www.ibm.com/software/rational/offerings/eam/)
– IBM Rational System Architect
Requirements management
(http://www.ibm.com/software/rational/offerings/irm/)
– IBM Rational Doors, IBM Rational Requisite pro
IT portfolio management
(http://www.ibm.com/software/rational/offerings/ppm/)
– IBM Rational Focal Point™
– IBM Rational Insight
– IBM Rational Asset Analyzer
Project management
– Rational Project Conductor™
– Rational Method Composer
Software license compliance
– IBM Tivoli License Manager
– IBM Tivoli Compliance Manager
– Change Management
4.3 Tools
This section discusses the tools that are available for systemically assisting you
in accelerating your software deployments. We encourage you to take advantage
of these tools and processes.
Our tools and procedures can be organized into five primary categories:
License and asset management tools

72
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
Compliance management tools
Software product compatibility tools
Tools for managing software projects
Self-help tools
Most organizations have a customized set of tools for managing projects and
monitoring deployment performance. It is not our goal to have only IBM products
in place to fulfill your tools requirements. It is more important that you recognize
any weaknesses in your tools strategies and take corrective action. To learn
more about any of the tools described in this chapter, contact your IBM software
sales representative or visit:
http://www.ibm.com
The overall goal of the tools discussed in this section is to help you to confidently
architect, install, and configure combinations of products in specific business
scenarios. These tools are our way of proactively making information available to
you that can assist you in avoiding problem management records and critical
situations.
4.3.1 Tools that facilitate software deployment management
Experience confirms that
portfolio, product, and project management
solutions
transform the way organizations define and deliver value.
Portfolio, product, and project management software from IBM
It is helpful to teams to align software and product investments with business
objectives. It helps to improve predictability and product success, manage and
optimize project execution, and measure team performance and project results.
The portfolio, product, and project management solutions deliver the following
values. They:
Continually prioritize investments, based on revenue potential, risk, and cost
Gather and use stakeholder input to prioritize the most valued products,
applications, and projects
Maintain clear visibility into performance across project, application, and
product life cycles
This concept is depicted graphically in Figure 4-6 on page 73.

Chapter 4. Accelerating software deployment using tools and assets
73
Figure 4-6 Values delivered by the IBM portfolio, product, and project management solutions
Other products in the category of portfolio, product, and project management
software are:
IBM Rational Focal Point
Offers the ability for you to evaluate investment scenarios to align product,
project, and application portfolio decisions with the overall business value.
IBM Rational Insight
Lets you measure, monitor, analyze, and trend your project and process
performance to make the best decisions for your business and for continual
process improvements.
IBM Rational Method Composer
Helps you to implement effective processes with a flexible process
management platform with tooling and the richest process library.
IBM Rational Project Conductor
Aids you in your goals to improve software and systems delivery with
streamlined, collaborative project and resource management.
IBM Rational Publishing Engine
Assists you in automating document generation from disparate applications
with a document generation solution that has built-in extractors.

74
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
For further details about these tools, visit:
http://www-01.ibm.com/software/rational/offerings/ppm/.
An example of how IBM implemented the portfolio, program, and project
management end-to-end solution is shown in Figure 4-7.
Figure 4-7 Depiction of how IBM implemented the portfolio, program, and project management solution
4.3.2 Tools that facilitate software deployment tracking
For software deployment tracking, we offer the following tools.
License and asset management tools
In today’s business, no company can be profitable without taking care of IT
resources. IT is more than just a link in a production chain. For many companies,
it is the key factor that improves overall corporate revenue. Even the smallest
organization needs to set up an IT infrastructure for their business.
The larger an organization is, the more complex the IT infrastructure needs to be
to support business objectives. This infrastructure requires time and money for
IBM Global Business Services
Rati ona l Focal Poi nt
Pr oj ect Char ter
Ag ree ment s
Fund in g
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P r oj ec t Pl a ns
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Rati onal
Team Conc ert (RT C)
Rati onal
Quali ty Manager
Portfolio, Program and Project Management
Ass et

Chapter 4. Accelerating software deployment using tools and assets
75
management and maintenance activities. In a large organization, a critical
business need is that you have a software solution that helps you to track assets
from financial, contractual, and physical perspectives. By having an integrated
view of your hardware and software assets, you enable the organization to plan
for hardware and software maintenance and upgrades, and to understand
exactly what resources are needed to support the business goals.
Typically, software assets are a key factor that is missing from asset
management. The primary focus of setting up an IT infrastructure is usually
related to software, not to hardware. Working with software products that are
running in a large infrastructure, including thousands of servers and desktops, is
not a trivial task. There are several benefits to using an enterprise solution to
accomplish this task. Several of these are that an enterprise-based solution
enables you to:
Legally enforce license agreements of procured products
Obtain information about the software that is actually used
Strive for full utilization of procured products, paying for support only on those
products that are used
Gather data for total cost of ownership analysis
Collecting information about the software products that are installed and used in
your IT infrastructure is the only way to achieve these benefits. To do this, an
explicitly designed system for asset and license management, along with
well-defined processes for using it, is necessary.
Taking control of software licenses
Software monitoring is the primary issue in software asset management. It is the
only way to know exactly what products are really needed, especially for large
environments. However, a solution for asset and license management is more
than just an inventory of software.
The real needs for asset management go far beyond a simple tool for tracking
software. You likely need to know if any of your departments are purchasing more
licenses than necessary because they do not know if the software is really
needed. Further, you need to know if this is exposing your company to the risk of
using software products in a noncompliant manner.
Taking control of your software licenses is just as important as tracking the life
cycle of hardware assets. A solution that tells you if you are overspending or
taking the risk of high penalties gives you an instrument to achieve these goals:
Reduce the overall cost of software license management and compliance
monitoring

76
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
Produce the licensing data necessary to plan for license upgrades and
migrations
Analyze the licensing data to determine if other options are more attractive
To attain these goals, your software procurement information must be properly
reconciled with software use and inventory data. Only by doing this is it possible
to tell whether you are paying more license fees than necessary or if you need
additional licenses to remove any compliance exposure.
IBM License Metric Tool
The IBM License Metric Tool helps Passport Advantage (see“License acquisition
and entitlement with Passport Advantage” on page 90), clients determine their
full and sub-capacity Processor Value Unit licensing requirements.
The IBM License Metric Tool is a product that helps to calculate the number of
Processor Value Units. The tool is available free of charge to Passport
Advantage and Passport Advantage Express customers. This includes
supported virtualized servers that are available to the Passport Advantage,
Processor Value Unit-based software. The IBM License Metric Tool enables you
to:
Achieve and maintain compliance: Use the report function to help determine if
you have the correct number of Processor Value Unit license entitlements, in
both full and sub-capacity environments, for each Passport Advantage,
Processor Value Unit-based product installed. The license terms of the
Passport Advantage sub-capacity offerings require that reports from this tool
be created, verified, adjusted, signed, and saved.
Support distributed server virtualization: Manage diversified workload
consolidations onto virtualized servers, using the partition-specific Processor
Value Unit-based software inventory reports.
Lower liability risks: Reduce the risk of not meeting your Passport Advantage,
Processor Value Unit-based contractual licensing conditions and facing
unplanned license compliance payments.
Track IBM Processor Value Unit-based software inventory: The tool maintains
a continuously updated inventory of where the Passport Advantage,
Processor Value Unit-based software assets are installed on your network.
Obtain the IBM License Metric Tool free of charge: Passport Advantage and
Passport Advantage Express customers can order the IBM License Metric
Tool at no-charge, using Passport Advantage or Passport Advantage Express
and part number D561HLL.
The IBM License Metric Tool is also useful for tracking the use of other types
of software in your organization. These include: freeware (free or low-cost
software with restricted use rights), open source software (modifiable source

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code that requires a software license), shareware (software generally used on
a trial basis), and non-IBM proprietary software.
For more information about the IBM License Metric Tool, visit:
Getting Started with IBM License Metric Tool presentation:
ftp://public.dhe.ibm.com/software/tivoli/products/license-metric-too
l/Getting_Started_with_IBM_LicenseMetricTool.pdf
Summary of Passport Advantage sub-capacity licensing requirements and
related offering documentation:
http://www-01.ibm.com/software/lotus/passportadvantage/subcaplicensi
ng.html
IBM Passport Advantage Sub-capacity offerings license terms require that
reports from this tool are created, verified, adjusted, signed, and saved:
http://www-01.ibm.com/software/lotus/passportadvantage/ibmlicensemet
rictool.html
IBM Enterprise Software Management Tool
The IBM Enterprise Software Management Tool is an innovative web solution
that is designed to help manage large, complex software license contracts
efficiently and effectively. The tool is a secure, online tool that is readily adaptable
to a variety of internal business processes. Because it is fully scalable, it is also
flexible enough to keep up with the rapid changes in business. The tool, which is
applicable to IBM software only, is a free service. With the same entry point for
both parties, the client and IBM have an up-to-date snapshot of the status of all of
your IBM license entitlements. It is the responsibility of the client to maintain the
database, or to provide access to the IBM client team. The data collection is
done manually.
Whenever you deploy, input, or update information, the Enterprise Software
Management tool automatically updates related data as well. This makes
up-to-date information available to you and IBM, simultaneously and in real time,
so there is no need for you or IBM to verify figures:
Access to the Enterprise Software Management tool
Granting both parties easy access to the same information is central to the
smooth running of a contract. As an online tool, this program makes
information available to both parties. Each time an action is performed within
the tool, it automatically notifies the right people, using email, which adds an
extra degree of transparency to the management of software license
contracts.

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The role of the Enterprise Software Management tool in software deployment
Each software deployment can be registered with the tool by the client, along
with details, such as the associated business unit. This assists both IBM and
the client in keeping the overview of deployed software current. Enterprise
Software Management tool reports can be generated, listing software
deployed and software not yet deployed.
Benefits and how the Enterprise Software Management tool can save you
time and money
There are multiple benefits of the tool, such as:
– Productivity savings
– Less manually-intensive work in tracking licenses
– Provides 24X7 access to view entitled software using a secure portal
– Decreased administrative tasks, translating into more time for you to focus
on business
– Improved visibility
– Historical reporting
– Improves visibility to the terms and conditions of the contract
The tool automatically updates the contract status and numbers of licenses,
as the data changes
Eases software deployment planning
Supports product substitution
For more information about the Enterprise Software Management tool, visit:
http://www-304.ibm.com/shop/americas/content/home/store_IBMPublicUSA/en
_US/enterprise_software.html.
IBM Tivoli License Manager
The IBM Tivoli License Manager tool is an offering for managing software
licenses, including non-IBM licenses.
The tool is a web-based solution that meets the challenge of supporting the
complex software asset management process. It provides software usage
metering, procurement management, license allocation, and compliance
support services, all on a variety of host platforms.
This tool assists you in meeting software asset management objectives by
accomplishing, often silently, a number of tasks, including:
– Collecting information about installed products using Tivoli Common
Inventory Technology for scans

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– Identifying the start and stop of software products on all machines on
which the IBM Tivoli License Compliance Manager agent is running
– Providing reports that allow the comparison of installed, used, and
procured licenses to support procurement management activities
– Metering software usage for products that have no license definitions or
requirements
– Generating alerts that automatically inform administrators when license
usage reaches a predefined level
– Assigning a pool of licenses to users and machines with a
product-specific, context-driven quantity that defines the number of
software instances, either installed or in execution, for a specific product
for compliance checks
– Associating the information contained in contracts to license definitions
– Providing for the security of confidential information by maintaining
security profiles and by the encryption of data during transmission
between the components of the IBM Tivoli License Compliance Manager
(see“Tivoli License Compliance Manager ” on page 80)
– Establishing electronic entitlement for IBM software, using prefilled,
error-free IBM license terms and definitions
– Providing the capability for managing a complex product, made up of
several components or bundles, possibly installed on different systems
– Offering logical partitioning and virtualization support, using layer
abstraction, and based on partitioning and virtualization elements in the
virtualization stack
For more information, visit the License Compliance Manager product line web
site at:
http://www-01.ibm.com/software/tivoli/products/license-mgrproductline/
Implementation best practices for IBM Tivoli License Manager (Redbooks
publication) are available at:
http://w3.itso.ibm.com/abstracts/sg247222.html
Compliance management tools
Compliance, corporate reporting, and auditing practices are now a critical issue
in an IT infrastructure. Given this, it is no surprise that an effective compliance
system is one of the best investments an organization can make. Organizations
need to ensure that their systems, and the software installed on their systems,
meet all of the current legal and regulatory requirements.

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Managing your compliance initiatives electronically provides for more proactive
risk management, decreased costs, increased public disclosure, productivity, and
a more effective way to ensure IT compliance with corporate policies and
regulatory requirements. Thus, to avoid surprises when an audit is done, use the
tools that can help. There are many tools on the market that take care of software
license compliance. IBM has the end-to-end solution.
For more information, visit:
http://www-01.ibm.com/software/tivoli/products/license-mgr/.
Tivoli License Compliance Manager
The Tivoli License Compliance Manager helps manage software costs and
license compliance. This is an IBM tool for identifying software inventory,
measuring software use activity, and automatically linking complex license
entitlements, thus enabling IT to align software spending with business priorities.
Specifically, this tool:
Helps IT proactively manage and verify increasingly complex software license
compliance tasks, and reduces unnecessary license fees by identifying
software inventory with low or no use activity
Enables the monitoring of software use trends, therefore assisting you in
budgeting for software with a focus on optimal software migrations, changes
in licensing, data center consolidations, outsourcing and in-sourcing events,
mergers and acquisitions, and disaster recovery planning
Facilitates in the preparation of contract negotiations by providing a complete
view of software deployed across the enterprise
Helps generate cost savings by automating the manual data collection
process needed for license compliance audits, redundant software cost
control, contract negotiations, and budget planning
Enhances the charge-back process by allocating expensive, low-use software
to the appropriate department
Supports multiple operating systems, such as AIX®, HP-UX, i family, Linux,
Solaris (Sun Microsystems), and Windows
For more details, see IBM Tivoli Asset Management for IT Portfolio Overview at:
http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/abstracts/sg247376.html?Open
4.3.3 Tools that facilitate software product compatibility
The IBM software product portfolio contains a broad array of products designed
to be used to construct scalable, robust solutions to complex problems. Given the
large software product portfolio at IBM, we are often asked how we can so

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quickly determine which products work together and what operating systems the
products support. The Software Product Compatibility Report is a new tool
designed to allow our clients to quickly and easily generate custom reports about
compatible IBM software combinations. The tool is available free of charge at:
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/prodguid/v1r0/clarity/index.ht
ml
Using this tool, you can create reports about the compatibility of a product with
regard to supported operating systems, prerequisite software, and virtualization
environments. Additionally, you can use the tool to tailor graphical reports that
define the end of service dates for a set of products.
Each report contains a date-time stamp for the date and time the database for
the tool was last updated. The database is updated regularly to reflect
combinations that are currently supported. This tool was created to complement
existing InfoCenters (see, “IBM Product Information Centers” on page 134). The
support shown in the reports generated by this tool might require a specific
maintenance for the products.
Figure 4-8 on page 82 is a snapshot of the types of reports provided by this tool.

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Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
Figure 4-8 The IBM Software Product Compatibility report tool provides multiple reports
Operating system reports
Operating system reports are designed to answer customer questions regarding
product compatibility with a set of operating systems. This tool contains three
reports from which you can explore relationships from a product or operating
system perspective. The operating system reports are:
Operating systems for a specific product
Products that use a specific operating system

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A matrix between specific products and a desired operating system
The
Operating Systems for a Specific Product
report generates a report from the
product perspective. In Figure 4-9, the user entered the partial product name,
“WebSphere Application,” clicked search, and selected the product and version
of interest from the search that product and version is compatible.
Figure 4-9 Sample Operating System report
The second operating system report,
Products that use a Specific Operating
System
, is similar to the Operating Systems for a Specific Product report.
However, the report is generated from the perspective of the operating system,
by listing the products that use a specific operating system. To generate this
report, you select a platform, operating system, version, and hardware, with
results displaying as shown in Figure 4-10 on page 84.

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Figure 4-10 Selecting values for a report on Products that use a Specific Operating System
The third report, the
Matrix Between Specific Products and the Desired
Operating System
report, is designed to allow you to construct a report based on
a custom list of products and the operating system of interest. Here, enter the
products and operating system as depicted in Figure 4-9 on page 83 and
Figure 4-10. Certain IBM products contain components that are deployable to
servers, desktops, and agents or endpoints. As shown in Figure 4-9 on page 83,
you can list the products and the desired operating system compatibility details
for each deployment unit. Figure 4-10 captures the matrix report generated using
the products and operating system as sample input. The reports are designed to
allow you to determine what works together at a glance.
Prerequisite reports
Prerequisite reports are designed to answer questions about product
compatibility with a set of prerequisites. Similar to the
Products that use a
Specific Operating System
reports, this tool contains three reports about

Chapter 4. Accelerating software deployment using tools and assets
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prerequisites. Here, you can explore prerequisite relationships from the product
or prerequisite perspective. Those three reports are:
Prerequisites of a Specific Product
Products that use a Specific Prerequisite
Matrix Between Specific Products and Desired Prerequisites
For the Prerequisites of a Specific Product report, you locate the product and
version of interest. The report lists all of the prerequisite software products. You
can filter the list based on the capabilities provided. Mandatory capabilities are
product prerequisites. Optional capabilities are the elective, supported software
that is defined for the product.
The Products that use a Specific Prerequisite report lets you list all of the IBM
software that use or support a specific product. The tool generates a report
containing the software that uses or supports a specific product.
The Matrix Between Specific Products and the Desired Prerequisites report
allows you to construct a report based on a custom list of products and
prerequisites planned for use. In essence, customers use this report to
determine if a set of prerequisites will work with a set of specific products.
Figure 4-11 on page 86 shows the sample matrix between specific products and
a desired operating system.
The report output shows:
Prerequisites support for each product
Prerequisites that are not applicable for each product
Prerequisites that do not support the each product

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Figure 4-11 Sample Matrix Between Specific Products and the Desired Operating System report

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Server virtualization environment reports
IBM established a set of virtualization environments that are supported across its
multi-platform product portfolio for servers. Virtualization environments consist of
the operating system and the virtualization technology. The
Server Virtualization
Environment
reports help clients in planning strategic deployment environments
for applications.
Server Virtualization Environment
reports answer questions
about product compatibility with a set of virtualization environments. Similar to
the operating system reports, this tool contains three reports about virtualization
environments, from which you can explore virtualization environment
relationships from the product or virtualization environment perspective. The
three reports are:
Server Virtualization Environments Supporting a Product
Products Supported by a Server Virtualization Environment
Matrix Between Specific Product(s) and the Desired Server Virtualization
Environments
For the
Server Virtualization Environments Supporting a Product
report, you
enter the product name, click search, and select the product and version from the
search results. The tool generates the report, listing the compatible virtualization
environment for that product and version. In Figure 4-12 on page 88, the product
selected is DB2® Enterprise Server Edition. These reports are designed to allow
users to determine what works together at a glance.

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Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
Figure 4-12 Selecting values for the
Server Virtualization Environments Supporting a Product report
The
Products Supported by a server Virtualization Environment
report lets you
determine which products are supported by a given server virtualization
environment.
End of service report for products
The
End of Service Report for Products
answers your questions about when
service will end for particular products. This report contains detailed information
about the available IBM Software Support Lifecycle Policies for a product set, so
that we can help customers realize the full value of their IBM software products.
Locate the products of interest using the search facility, select the product and
version from the search results, and set a desired starting quarter/year. A sample
report is shown in Figure 4-13 on page 89.

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Figure 4-13 Sample End of Service Report for Products
The End of Service Report for Products lists the service windows that are
officially announced by IBM and those that are estimated. Finally, the span of
time during which all products on your list are supported is also indicated as the
common service window.
Globalization report
In the interest of internationalization, you might want to know which languages
are supported by our products. See Figure 4-14 on page 90.

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Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
Figure 4-14 The Globalization report describes the languages that are supported, by product
4.3.4 Self-help tools
Self-sufficiency is another software deployment best practice from IBM. IBM
focused a great deal of energy on providing you with the tools needed to be
self-sufficient. Most of this work occurred in the problem management and in the
software fulfillment space.
Problem management
IBM provides an extensive set of self-help tools for problem reporting,
management, and tracking.
For more information, visit:
http://www.ibm.com/support
License acquisition and entitlement with Passport Advantage
IBM offers two license acquisition and maintenance programs: Passport
Advantage and Passport Advantage Express. Passport Advantage is designed

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for larger enterprises. Passport Advantage Express is designed to meet the
needs of small or medium-sized businesses. Passport Advantage is the IBM
comprehensive software licensing and software maintenance program. It is a
global program, designed to save you money at every stage of your software
acquisition and use. Passport Advantage is the most flexible and cost-effective
way for you to reap the benefits of new releases of the latest technology and
technical support to keep your business up and running, plus obtain volume
pricing for significant software purchases. It can help to lower your acquisition
and administrative costs, facilitate migration to new platforms, boost productivity,
and increase profits.
For more information, visit the Passport Advantage Home at:
http://www-01.ibm.com/software/support/pa.html
Software maintenance using Passport Advantage
IBM Software licenses purchased using Passport Advantage have an associated
S&S program that complements your IBM Software purchases. It includes both
product upgrades and technical support. It also fosters successful software
deployments. You can upgrade to new releases and new versions as the needs
of your business dictate. Our technical support team helps keep your users up
and running wherever they are in the world. This is our way of making sure you
are covered with the technical support you need and your way of getting an
increased return on your IBM investment of a total software solution.
For more information, see Chapter 7, “The value of maintaining IBM Software
Subscription and Support (S&S)” on page 143, or visit:
http://www.ibm.com/support
4.4 Software deployment accelerators
Accelerators can contribute to successful software deployment throughout the
entire software deployment life cycle. In this chapter we discuss the most
important accelerators that are readily available from IBM.
The accelerators discussed are:
Programs that you can execute in collaboration with IBM to help plan,
understand, configure, or install software solutions. These programs are
usually performed as a service, but free of charge in most cases. The
following programs are discussed:
– 4.4.1, “Proof of Technology ” on page 92
– 4.4.2, “Client lab advocacy program” on page 94

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Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
– 4.4.3, “IBM solution review” on page 97
– 4.4.4, “The software Accelerated Value Program ” on page 98
– 4.4.5, “Business and IT alignment” on page 101
Tools that can assist you in software deployment, discussed in 4.3, “Tools” on
page 71.
Guidances to help you in a better overall planning, design and architecture of
enterprise solutions and the role of software products therein. This is
discussed in 4.5, “Guidances” on page 104.
Education helping you to plan, configure, install and use the software. See
6.1, “What this chapter is about” on page 130.
4.4.1 Proof of Technology
A Proof of Technology (PoT) is a hands-on workshop in which participants
execute a number of predefined scenarios that demonstrate the capabilities of a
product or suite of products. PoTs can be different in length, anywhere from
one-half to two days, depending on the product. More complex PoTs can be
longer. PoTs are free of charge to IBM clients and prospective clients.
When do you need a PoT
A PoT can be helpful in gaining a better understanding of the functionalities and
usability of a product. After having read product brochures and viewing
presentations and demos on a product, participating in a PoT is the next step.
PoTs are conducted by subject matter experts (SMEs), so they provide an
excellent opportunity to discuss complex technical issues related to the product,
specific to your organization.
Requesting a PoT
There are two ways to request and attend a PoT, talk with your IBM
representative or attend a prescheduled PoT. Select the method most convenient
for you.
Talk with your IBM representative
Inform your IBM representative of your interest in attending a PoT. Your IBM
representative will check the availability of PoT events and discuss with you how
and when to deliver the PoT.
Attend a prescheduled PoT
1.Go to the IBM Events page at:
https://www-950.ibm.com/events
2.View a list of event types, as shown in Figure 4-15 on page 93.

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Figure 4-15 The web page for IBM Events
3.Click a category of interest, for example, IBM General Business Events, to
display a list of available PoTs in that category. The designation “PoT” is
included in titles, where applicable.
The browser automatically detects your country. To select another country,
use the [change] link that displays at the top of all Event pages, including that
shown in Figure 4-15.
4.For the PoT of interest, follow the instructions to register or arrange for a
personal delivery of a PoT at your organization.
How PoTs are delivered
Prescheduled PoTs are typically conducted at any of the IBM Technical
Exploration Centers around the world. Most countries have an IBM Technical
Exploration Center. If you have a group that is interested in a particular PoT, we
can organize a PoT for delivery at your organization, depending on available
infrastructure and classrooms. In most cases, the required infrastructure consists
of workstations with VMware images of the required products. Occasionally,
connectivity with a mainframe host is used. More and more PoTs are executed in
“sandbox” format, using the terminal server concept. You can use the product,
hands-on, and consider how it will best be used your organization.

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The next step
PoTs follow common scenarios and highlight the most significant functions of the
solution. At the conclusion of the PoT, you will have a general understanding of
the functionality of the product. However, in most cases the PoT event will not
provide enough evidence that the product can address the issues specific to your
organization. The next step is a Proof of Concept (PoC) event, in which you
further explore the product specific to your environment.
A more extensive, Proof of Concept service engagement can be provided as a
risk mitigation tool. For details about PoC, fee-based engagements, see 4.4.2,
“Client lab advocacy program” on page 94.
4.4.2 Client lab advocacy program
The Client Lab Advocacy Program is a premium, post-sales relationship program
between selected clients, our product development organization, and select IBM
Business Partners. The objective of this program is to help you to extract the
maximum value from your software investment and explain our future plans. In
return, we gather feedback from you that can steer our development plans and
priorities.
The lab advocate provides information to you about our product futures and
serves as a connection point to our product development organization. This
program is currently offered for all of the IBM software brands, including
WebSphere, Lotus Information Management, Rational, and Tivoli.
The relationship sustained by the Client Lab Advocacy Program expands the lab
advocate's knowledge about your IT challenges and requirements. It also gives
you a voice in the development of our future products and increases your
knowledge of our long-term strategies.
How the program works
The Client Lab Advocacy Program is specifically designed for clients with whom
we have had a close, vested relationship over the previous 12 months. At the
beginning of the program, you are assigned a lab advocate for a key product in
your environment. The lab advocate typically works with your architecture,
design, solution, and delivery leads on new projects, best practices, migration,
and upgrade plans to extract the maximum value from your software investment.
The Client Lab Advocacy Program is in effect for one year. Renewals for
additional one year terms require renewal of product licenses and a renewal of
the agreement to participate.

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Lab advocate
The lab advocate works with the IBM account team and acts as a direct link
between you and the IBM software development organization. The advocate
provides us with perspectives from your organization by focusing on
understanding your business, IT installations, your needs and expectations, and
the use of our products and solutions to ensure high client satisfaction. Lab
advocates provide insight into future development plans, address product
questions and concerns, and ensure that you are utilizing the capabilities of IBM
software products to manage and grow your business today and in the future. By
being knowledgeable about your IT structure and business needs, the advocate,
in turn, feeds your key client requirements directly into development for
consideration. Multiple advocates can be assigned to a client, based on the
scope of the client’s business needs.
Qualifications of the lab advocate
Those who serve as lab advocates are fairly senior members of IBM who are
highly skilled in their area of expertise. Typically, a lab advocate has stellar
business qualities:
Is viewed as a leader and team player in an area of expertise
Has a rich mix of technical skills
Possesses the desire to work with a top IBM client
Is resourceful and responsive
Has excellent communication skills
Goals of the lab advocate
The goals of the lab advocate are multi-faceted:
Enhance your knowledge of the IBM offerings and long-range strategies, our
partnership capabilities, and how we can help your business grow
Be proactive in broadening their understanding of your environment,
requirements, and challenges
Assist the IBM account team in clarifying your key requirements to our
technical community
Develop a long-lasting relationship with you, resulting in greater trust and
openness between you and IBM
Communicate regularly with you and the IBM account team
Role of the lab advocate
An advocate has extensive product knowledge and is committed to promoting a
successful relationship between you and IBM. They engage with you and the
IBM client team to provide assistance and serve as an information resource.

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The advocate is committed to:
Actively engaging with your team for short-term and long-term account plans
Understanding your environment in terms of topology and applications, and in
future goals and directions
Participating in briefings on trends and directions
Providing assistance with migration, architecture, performance, and
configuration
Exchanging information with the IBM lab and client team and validating
requirements and solutions
Determining, with the IBM client team, the appropriateness of
teleconferences and on-site visits with the client
The role of the advocate does not include serving as:
A remote software engineer
An alternative to IBM fee-based service offerings
A critical situation manager
A requirements solicitor, although the lab advocate provides input to the IBM
development organization, based on your feedback
A pre-sales support offering
Inner circle program
The Inner Circle Program is a specialized program offered by the WebSphere
brand. It is a two-year program, based on a close, vested business relationship
over the previous 12 months. This program provides you with an IBM executive
advocate, a lab advocate, and an invitation for three persons from your
organization to attend the private WebSphere Inner Circle at the Annual Impact
Conference.
In this program, your Inner Circle executive advocate maintains a long-term
relationship with a member of your IT leadership team. The executive advocate
meets with and discusses client projects and issues, shares broader IBM and
WebSphere plans and strategies, and can serve as a connection between the
IBM and WebSphere development and business executive teams.
In addition to the executive advocate, one or more technical Inner Circle lab
advocates are assigned for the key WebSphere products in your environment.
Lab advocates typically work with client architecture, design, and solution and
delivery leads on new projects, best practices, migration, and upgrade plans to
help you extract the maximum value from your investment. Technical Inner Circle

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lab advocates can provide information about product futures and are a
connection point to the WebSphere development laboratories.
As a participant in the Inner Circle Program, you are also invited to participate in
the Annual Inner Circle Conference event and other Inner Circle update calls and
briefings throughout the year.
When the two-year program is concluded, a renewal for an additional two years
requires an additional license purchase and a renewal of the agreement to
participate.
4.4.3 IBM solution review
IBM has several processes in place to improve project success based on IBM
technology. The Solution Review is one of these. Also known as the Technical
and Delivery Assessment, the Solution Review is available for:
Hardware configuration and architecture reviews
Software configuration and architecture reviews
Services scope of work and project plan reviews
Complex projects can require a combination of these reviews, including
dependencies between them. For these projects, we provide an Integrated
Technical Review. This is undertaken when highly complex issues, such as
cross-brand and cross-geographies, require a project-wide, holistic view. (For
more information about the Integrated Technical Review, contact your IBM
representative.)
The introduction of the Solution Review came about to minimize technical risks
for projects that we prepare or, when applicable, that are prepared by IBM
Business Partners or Systems Integrators using IBM technology. Typically, we
suggest that a Solution Review take place when additional IBM products are
added to an existing IBM product portfolio, or when a purchase represents a
substantial change to your environment.
The focus of the solution review
We prepare a Solution Review for your deployment project with a focus on
identifying:
Solution architecture inhibitors
The solution and solution implementation risks
A risk mitigation plan
Each of these topics is evaluated by your IBM architect or specialist, the solution
design team, and the Solution Reviewer. With input from these professionals, the

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Solution Review provides valuable information for deploying your software
successfully.
The process
The process of defining a Solution Review begins with a Solution Design and
contains several check points to identify risks early on in the design process for
quality risk mitigation. By following the guidance of the Solution Review, you can
be confident that the software can be deployed consistent with your
requirements.
Further, the Solution Review process can be complemented by a Readiness Plan
that addresses implementation and operations risks of the project. For details of
the Readiness Plan, see 2.3.2, “Readiness plan” on page 29. We can also
include a determination of whether your project teams have adequate plans in
place, in the case of unidentified implementation risks occurring.
For cases for which your solution has been designed by an IBM Business Partner
or Systems Integrator, the partner or integrator will likely follow their own Solution
Review and Design Review processes. If needed, IBM can provide the Solution
Review to the Business Partner or Systems Integrator for you.
Additional information
For additional information, consult:
Your IBM representative for information about the Solution Review process for
Business Partners and System Integrators applicable in your country
Your Business Partner or Systems Integrator directly for more information
about their Solution Review process and Solution Design documentation
Your IBM representative for more information about IBM Solution Review
offerings
4.4.4 The software Accelerated Value Program
The mission of the software Accelerated Value Program is to unlock the value of
your IBM software investment by delivering enhanced technical advisory
offerings that maximize your Return On Investment (ROI). This offering applies to
the IBM software product families, including Business Analytics, Information
Management, Industry Solutions, Lotus, Rational, Tivoli, and WebSphere.
For further details about Accelerated Value Program, visit:
http://www-01.ibm.com/software/support/acceleratedvalue/productfamily.h
tml

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Participating in the Accelerated Value Program is a proactive way of building a
trusted, long-term partnership with your IBM experts. It provides you with a single
point of contact, access to technical experts, knowledge-sharing activities,
standard processes, best practices, and more, to provide continuous growth for
your organization.
The Accelerated Value Program provides a level of IBM middleware support that
is significantly greater than standard technical support arrangements. Our staff is
dedicated to you as the customer. Proactive and reactive services are provided,
and Accelerated Value Program teams coordinate the availability of all IBM
resources.
Benefits of the Accelerated Value Program
Our program gives you time to address your business needs because it focuses
on your IT environment by delivering proactive support, knowledge and skill
sharing problem management, and much more.
Proactive support
We deliver real support in the areas of:
Planning, upgrades, and migration
Potential problem identification and prevention
Early notification of potential critical situations
Best practices sharing
The Accelerated Value Program, which builds upon the support offered by the
IBM Subscription and Support (S&S) program
Knowledge and skill sharing
We offer the technical knowledge to improve your business in the areas of:
On-site technical activities, such as discussions led by IBM engineers on
specific subjects, technologies, and skill areas
Staff coaching, workshops, and guidance
Invitations to remote briefings, summits, and seminars
Technical conference calls delivered by IBM SMEs
Access to the Accelerated Value Program dedicated and customizable web
portal:
http://www.ibm.com/software/support

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Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
Problem management
We provide assistance in managing problems when they arise in the areas of:
Emergency on-site assistance
Priority call handling and assignment of problem management records to
technically senior analysts
Assistance in coordinating technical issue solutions
Reporting on support issues and trends
Escalation management
Single point of contact for most technical issues, without regard to brand
Operational and technical guidance
Our areas of expertise include research on interoperability, architecture, and
performance, in addition to guidance on installation, configuration, and trend
analysis.
Best practices
We learn about your IT environment, infrastructure, and people. Then, we help
you to avoid known software defects and provide recommendations to help avoid
known issues.
Productivity enhancement
Assistance with problem management, including priority escalation, reporting on
support issues, and personalized trend analysis.
Your single point of contact
The Accelerated Value Program provides an Accelerated Value Leader as your
single point of contact. The Accelerated Value Leader provides strategic advice
and assists you with projects in your software infrastructure. That person also
follows up with your problem management records, globally, and provides regular
updates.
Your Accelerated Value Leader can be assisted by one or more brand-focused,
Accelerated Value Specialists. An Accelerated Value Specialist is assigned to a
specific area of technology and provides direct support and assistance with
technical questions from you and your field staff.
Why choose the Accelerated Value Program
The Accelerated Value Program helps our clients to achieve a faster
time-to-value and a lower total cost of ownership. It provides an overall faster
time to problem resolution, and proactive assistance with problem prevention. In

Chapter 4. Accelerating software deployment using tools and assets
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line with one of the goals that we have at IBM, participation in the program
promotes a lasting partnership between IBM and you.
For more information
Learn why our clients continue to choose this program. A case study from one of
our clients is documented in the article, Value Proposition for IBM Software
Accelerated Value Program: Quantifying the Cost/Benefit Case from the
International Technology Group. This article is located at:
http://w3.ibm.com/software/xl/portal/content?synKey=D467264L67453V27
More about the key features of the world-class, enterprise-level support available
through the IBM Software Accelerated Value Program is located at:
http://www-01.ibm.com/software/support/acceleratedvalue/av_enterprise.
html
http://www.ibm.com/software/support/acceleratedvalue
4.4.5 Business and IT alignment
Business and IT Alignment is an IBM offering for a client and IBM joint IT
development plan. It is based on The Open Group Architecture Framework
enterprise architecture methodology and provides identification of IT projects and
an IT project roadmap.
At the end of the Business and IT Alignment engagement, the client will be able
to answer the following questions:
How ready is my IT Environment* to face the business initiatives driven by our
strategy?
What is the IBM suggested future IT architecture?
What is the roadmap for advancing from the current architecture to the future
architecture?
What are the next steps?
Figure 4-16 on page 102 depicts some of these considerations.

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Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
Figure 4-16 Enterprise architecture evaluation
Business and IT Alignment, illustrated in Figure 4-17 on page 103, provides a
value both to you as the client and to IBM. It is a structured approach for maturity
assessment in different domains, from the architecture to process and
organization perspectives, and provides an excellent base for defining project
priorities and your project roadmap. This information helps vendors, such as IBM,
to better understand when, where, and how IBM can support you, which reflects
on the quality of support you can expect from IBM. You can also expect IBM
resource planning will assure that the right resources with the right skills are
available when you need them.
The methodology of this assessment usually takes approximately six-to-eight
weeks and has four distinct stages:
Architectural evaluation
Business initiatives analysis
Gap analysis
Roadmap elaboration
Application
Architecture
Business
Architecture.
Business Pl ans,
Performance Plans,
Business Rules,
Business
Requirements
Technical
Architecture
Systems Management
Collaborative
Capabilities
Information
Architecture
Governance
The purpose of a governance framework is to provide poli cy guidance, advice and assistance in the definition,
design and implementation of the Enterprise Architecture
Investment Tracking
Appl ication
Devel opment
Vendor & Contract
Management
IT Management
Processes
Technol ogy
Strategy and
Governance
Peopl e and Org
I ntegration
Capabili ti es
Appl ications
Capabilities
Enterprise Architecture Evaluation
Informati on Processes
The business strategy,
strategic alignment,
and key business
processes.
The structure of an
organizati on's logical
and physical data
assets and data
management
resources.
The bluepri nt for the
indi vidual application
systems to be
deployed, their
interactions, and thei r
relationships to the
core busi ness
processes of the
organi zation.
The i nfrastructure
intended to support the
depl oyment of core,
mission-criti cal
applications.
Data

Chapter 4. Accelerating software deployment using tools and assets
103
Figure 4-17 Business and IT alignment
The architectural evaluation is based on a comparative analysis of the client’s
architecture with two reference models:
Enterprise architecture
Industry reference architecture
The second stage of this methodology includes an analysis of the technical
requirements within the context of current and future business initiatives.
The third stage combines the two initial stages to perform a gap analysis that
establishes priorities, business value against gap reduction, and capabilities
requirements.
Finally, a roadmap is performed to present a series of actions with the objective
of reducing architectural gaps and maximizing the business value obtained from
IT.
Process and Proposed Schedule (Tentative)
Core Banking
IMS
Credit Card
AS/400
Mutual Fund
ESunFund Mgmt
Trust
AS/400
Foreign Exchange
AS/400
Teller System
JFTS
Teller System
WSBCC
Consumer
NetBank
& Web ATM
Corporate
NetBank
Call Center
- Banking
Branch
AS/400
EAI
-MQWF
EAI
-MQSI
E.Sun
Security
Internet
Securities
AS/400
MQ
SQL
Server
MQ
5250
Gateway
MQ
SQL
Server
MQ
ATM
IVR
Foreign
Exchange
Workstation
Consumer
Banking
Notes
Call Center
-Credit Card
FISC
÷›éQ
FEDI
5250
Gateway
MQ
Overseas
Branch
CPS
Domino
MQ
Customer
Data
Warehouse
Wealth
Mgmt
Branches
IT Interviews
Document as-is architecture
Discussion and Final
Presentation
Future-State
Design
Identify Opp
for
Improvement
Current-
State
Analysis
Define
Business
Value
Architecture To-Be State
Business
IT
Interviews
Location: Ljubljana
•LOB & IT Interviews
•Discuss to-be state vision
Analysis and Report Creation
Location: Remote
•Gap Analysis
•Business and IT Alignment
•Design IT future state
Final Presentation
Location: Ljubljana
Validate IT future state
•Final Presentation
Workshop Preparation
Location: Remote
•Data collection (process & arch)
•Confirm participant attendance
Align
Align
Align
Align
Align
Align
Workshop Preparation
LOB Interviews
Document business Initiatives
Business Requirements
Business Challenges
Technology Opportunities
June 2009
July 2009
July 2009
August 2009

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Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
Workshop preparation is important for an efficient workshop delivery. There are a
lot of workshop preparation activities in which the client and IBM are involved,
such as:
Agreement among all parties about the goal, dates, and locations of
workshops and the final presentation
Obtaining commitment from the crucial persons to participate in the workshop
The client performing basic data collection for use at the workshop and for
initial analysis by a Business and IT Alignment expert
To achieve the best results from the interviews, it is important to have enough
preparation time. This phase usually takes two-to-three weeks.
A final presentation is made to all client stakeholders who participated in the
engagement, including the proposed action plan. The purpose of the final
presentation workshop is to agree on an action plan and the next steps.
The following list contains typical deliverables:
Main conclusions (one or two main sentences)
A prioritized list of the main IT gaps that impact your business initiatives
A brief explanation of our reasoning
A prioritized list of recommendations
The proposed Project Roadmap and next steps
4.5 Guidances
This section discusses the following two solutions:
Frameworks, models, and other reusable assets
IBM Global Solution Centers
4.5.1 Frameworks, models, and other reusable assets
One of the accelerators that benefits software deployment is reusable assets.
Examples of these are frameworks, components, and various types of models.
Ideally these reusable assets are industry-specific and built up over time using
experience in the industry.
IBM Industry Frameworks is a set of frameworks that combines the unmatched
capabilities of IBM software with industry-specific solution assets and best
practices that are configured to meet the unique challenges and business needs
of an industry.

Chapter 4. Accelerating software deployment using tools and assets
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Each framework provides IBM market-leading middleware capabilities in an
industry context, while creating an agile foundation for future growth. IBM
Industry Frameworks is the primary software platform for IBM Industry Solutions,
accelerating time-to-value and payback and simultaneously lowering project cost
and risk.
The main benefits of the IBM Industry Frameworks are:
Speed of implementation with repeatable architectural patterns and
accelerators
Flexibility to progressively transform to a simplified architecture, one project at
a time
Choice of how to get started and who to partner with for business capabilities
Cost reduction through the re-use of services and assets and through faster
implementation
Alignment of business and IT priorities for more effective results from solution
implementation
IBM Industry Frameworks exist for almost all industries:
Banking
Chemical and petroleum
Electronics, automotive and aerospace and defense
Energy and utilities
Government
Healthcare and life sciences
Financial markets
Insurance
Media and entertainment
Retail and consumer products
Travel and transportation
Telecommunications
The extent and exact content of each framework varies by industry. Let us see
what the IBM Industry Framework looks like for the banking industry.
Framework example: Banking
The
IBM Banking Industry Framework
provides a banking-specific software
platform for deploying solutions for customer care and insight, integrated risk
management, payments and securities, and core banking transformation. It
provides industry-specific software extensions, solution accelerators, and best
practices to speed the deployment of smart banking solutions at reduced cost
and risk. The framework supports open and industry standards. In addition,

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Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
applications provided by an ecosystem of framework partners are optimized for
the framework middleware.
Customers can get started with a frameworks approach with a project that
leverages components of the framework. Over time, project-by-project,
customers can move to a simplified, more strategic technology infrastructure to
support the changing needs of their business. With each project, customers can
realize a return on investment in a short payback period. The frameworks
approach supports a practical, progressive approach to transformation.
Figure 4-7 on page 74 provides an overview of all the assets and asset types that
are available for the banking industry.
Figure 4-18 Assets and asset types in the banking framework
Solution
Templates
Banking
Vocabulary
Design
Rules
Banking
Message
Model
Common Shared
Services
Banking
Extensions for
MDM Server
Services
Component
Building Blocks
Development
Tools /
Methodology
WTX Industry
Packs
Financial
Transaction Manager
pureXML
TM
Payments
Bundles
WebSphere
BI for FN
Corporate
Payments Scenario
Information FrameWork
(IFW) & Banking Data
Warehouse (BDW) Process
and Data Models
COGNOS
Banking
Performance
Blueprints
SOA
Banking
Scenarios
WebSphere
Modeler with
IFW
Rational
Software
Architect with
IFW
WebSphere
Banking Content
Pack
COGNOS Banking
Performance
Blueprints
Customer
Identification Solution
Common Business
Language Services
Accelerator
Banking Data Integration
Accelerators
WebSphere Multichannel
Bank Transformation
Toolkit
Account Opening
Scenario
COGNOS Banking
Risk Performance
– Credit Risk
Entity Analytics
and Global Name
Recognition
Finance and
Integrated Risk
Management (FIRM)
COGNOS Risk
Adjusted
Profitability
Blueprint
IBM Service
Management
for IRM
Payments & Securities
Core Banking Transformation
IBM Foundational
Customer Care & Insight
Integrated Risk Management
Solution
Templates
Banking
Vocabulary
Design
Rules
Banking
Message
Model
Common Shared
Services
Banking
Extensions for
MDM Server
Services
Component
Building Blocks
Development
Tools /
Methodology
WTX Industry
Packs
Financial
Transaction Manager
pureXML
TM
Payments
Bundles
WebSphere
BI for FN
Corporate
Payments Scenario
Information FrameWork
(IFW) & Banking Data
Warehouse (BDW) Process
and Data Models
COGNOS
Banking
Performance
Blueprints
SOA
Banking
Scenarios
WebSphere
Modeler with
IFW
Rational
Software
Architect with
IFW
WebSphere
Banking Content
Pack
COGNOS Banking
Performance
Blueprints
Customer
Identification Solution
Common Business
Language Services
Accelerator
Banking Data Integration
Accelerators
WebSphere Multichannel
Bank Transformation
Toolkit
Account Opening
Scenario
COGNOS Banking
Risk Performance
– Credit Risk
Entity Analytics
and Global Name
Recognition
Finance and
Integrated Risk
Management (FIRM)
COGNOS Risk
Adjusted
Profitability
Blueprint
IBM Service
Management
for IRM
Payments & Securities
Core Banking Transformation
IBM Foundational
Customer Care & Insight
Integrated Risk Management

Chapter 4. Accelerating software deployment using tools and assets
107
IBM Industry Frameworks accelerates software deployment
As depicted in Figure 4-18 on page 106, a framework provides guidance in
implementing complex solutions, for example, solution templates and the
methodology guide you in taking the right steps in designing your new solution
architecture and the underlying software architecture. It is here where
frameworks can really help in software deployment.
Applying a framework, such as the IBM Industry Framework for banking,
ultimately tells you which software products you will need for a given solution
design. This is the primary and direct benefit of using an IBM Industry
Framework for software deployment.
4.5.2 IBM Global Solution Centers
IBM is instrumental in bridging the gap between business challenges and the
deployment of innovative technologies across industries. At our Industry Solution
Centers (such as the Global Solution Centers, the IBM Forum La Gaude,
Industry and Solution Centers, and Executive Briefing Centers), we discuss and
demonstrate several of our methods for integrating high-value industry solutions.
At our Industry Solution Centers, we exhibit several of our solutions to clients and
prospective clients. Over time, we have fine-tuned these solutions to produce
more efficient results and for applicability to other environments. The Industry
Solution Centers are our way of showcasing that these solutions have met some
of the toughest business needs among a wide range of industries. Figure 4-19 on
page 108 shows an example of an Industry Solution Center framework.

108
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
Figure 4-19 Framework of the IBM Industry Solution Center
All client Centers worldwide can be identified within their Center category group.
The Client Center category groups are:
Executive Briefing Centers
Executive Briefing Centers offer sales organizations a powerful tool to help
shorten the sales cycle, grow opportunities, and close deals. Briefings are
customized to sales objectives. SMEs provide expertise in product, brand,
and services.
Industry and Business Solution Centers
Industry and Solution Centers are a broad spectrum of Centers that provide
sales support to IBM client teams from early in the sales cycle to delivery,
including demos, workshops, Proofs of Concept (PoCs), etc. These Centers
offer expertise and capabilities in industry-specific solutions, cross-industry
solutions, or both.

Chapter 4. Accelerating software deployment using tools and assets
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Technology Centers
Technology Centers offer another way to showcase our worldwide Systems
and Technology Group SMEs, their technology leadership, and that of our
partners in support of the Systems and Technology Group and overall IBM
portfolio. These worldwide Systems and Technology Group Client Centers
provide access to globally available, large-scale physical infrastructure
allowing clients, business partners, and independent software vendors to
experience, first hand, how IBM solutions and technologies can add value to
their business. A staff of technical professionals, with field and lab experience,
provide thought leadership to address a particular business need or
challenge, along with the value of our key strategic initiatives, such as
Dynamic Infrastructure®, Smart Analytics and cloud computing.
Technology Centers provide global support for all IBM hardware and software
products. They architect and design, prove and measure, and validate and
review solutions, based on industry requirements, while highlighting IBM
technology.
Worldwide Design Centers
Our worldwide Design Centers are state-of-the-art facilities where certified IT
architects and specialists work with clients and Business Partners to analyze,
assess, and design IT infrastructure solutions.
For details, email design@us.ibm.com or visit
http://www.ibm.com/systems/services/designcenter.
Business Partner Centers
Business Partner Centers are owned by either IBM or an IBM Business
Partner.
IBM-owned Centers provide your Business Partners with customized
assistance to help build solutions, grow cutting-edge skills, and explore the
latest open standards-based and open source technologies. IBM-owned
Centers also provide Business Partners with access to IBM technical,
marketing, and sales experts, worldwide.
Business Partner-owned Centers offer a consultative approach to solution
selling and strategic initiatives. These Centers focus on cross-selling to
increase the clothing rate for hardware, software, and services.
IBM Marketing and Conference Centers
Design, build, and operate an innovative and compelling IBM event and
collaboration experience, for clients and partners with distinct competencies,
to be run in the client or partner proximity.

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Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
IBM Forum Centers
IBM Forum Centers provide executive-level conference facilities. Experiential
solution demonstrations, supported by marketing messaging, and a dedicated
staff for logistical, IT/AV, and event management support. This ensures a
superior client experience. IBM Forum Centers can be multi-purpose or
multi-mission, or for single- and multi-client and Business Partner events.
IBM Forum Conference Centers
Host executive-level conferences, including single- and multi-client and
Business Partner events at the IBM Forum Conference Centers. Marketing
messaging and dedicated logistical, IT/AV and event management support
ensure a superior client experience.
Figure 4-20 shows a sample of several solutions deployed in our Industry
Solution Centers.
Figure 4-20 Grouped categories at IBM Industry Solution Centers

Chapter 4. Accelerating software deployment using tools and assets
111
4.6 Conclusion
Make use of these centers that showcase the best solutions. Use them to receive
guidance about architecture solutions for your unique business challenges. Then,
consider an architecture workshop at one of our IBM Design Centers. To visit an
IBM Industry Solution Center, contact your IBM representative.

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© Copyright IBM Corp. 2011. All rights reserved.
113
Chapter 5.
Using IBM Services to
complement your skills and
accelerate value
5

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Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
5.1 What this chapter is about
We discussed the challenges of realizing value from your software purchase in
Chapter 1., “Software deployment perspectives and challenges” on page 1 of this
publication. We discussed challenges in several categories, including ownership,
organizational, and technical challenges. As a whole, this book addresses the
best practices, recommended methods, and considerations that can help to
address these challenges.
In certain instances, your internal IT organization might not have the required
skills or experience to deploy your new software. Or, they might need additional
capacity or support to ensure that the new software is not only used, but that it
provides the most business value.
More specifically, many IBM services are designed to overcome situations, such
as:
The project team does not understand the business value of a given product
or solution
There is not enough knowledge about a product to deploy it successfully
Deployment skills for the current software product are lacking and so, even
though the value of the software is understood, training is necessary to avoid
serious delays in the project
A product does not perform or scale (or it is believed that this is the case)
There is no bandwidth for people to deploy the software or manage the
deployment of software
Rapid deployment and quick wins are required that demand using prior
experience and patterns of use from the vendor
This chapter is not intended to be an exhaustive list of the offerings available
from IBM services organizations, but it does highlight a few specific examples of
our services offerings that can address these needs, and that have been
designed to address the objective of getting value from your software. See
Appendix C., “Services offerings” on page 203 for a list of more relevant services
offerings. Speak with your IBM representative about any of these services
offerings.
5.2 Why you need services
In 1.4.1, “Approaches to value realization” on page 8, we outline the approaches
to value realization from your purchased software. In that chapter, we discussed

Chapter 5. Using IBM Services to complement your skills and accelerate value
115
that the value of software can be measured by price alone, by its level of use, or,
at best, by measuring the business impact of the project for which the software is
used. In most cases, software is of little value unless it is deployed and used.
The deployment of purchased software might be delayed, or not take place at all,
if the skills and resource levels required are not applied appropriately. Chapter 1,
“Software deployment perspectives and challenges” on page 1 also discusses a
number of factors that can inhibit the value of purchased software. Some of these
factors can be overcome by engaging the specialized services of IBM or an IBM
Business Partner. The following list contains several of these factors:
The project team is unsure if the software addresses the true business needs
and whether it has the functionalities that are of value. The team might need
more knowledge about the product and how its functionalities can benefit the
project. Occasionally, this lack of knowledge results in highly functional
software that is not deployed. One solution is to seek the services of IBM to
demonstrate the software functionalities to your team.
The necessary skills are not available within the organization to efficiently
deploy the software. Although the value and functionality of the product might
be clearly understood, a lack of technical skills in software deployment can
delay the project significantly. One solution is to train employees in installing
and configuring the software. Another solution is to bring in IBM to provide
this service. It is also possible that obtaining skills for the chosen solution is
difficult in your local region, so using the global resource pool from IBM or a
remote provision of skills might be appropriate.
Deployment and configuration of the software are successful. Still, the
product is not used for its intended purpose. Perhaps there is a need for
additional training to take full advantage of product functionalities. Users need
to know how to use the software properly and efficiently. Especially for
newly-available software products, this requires education and experience.
One solution is to provide adequate time for training to encourage a comfort
level with the product. An adjunct to this solution is to hire experts to begin
building the first solution during this time of training and initial experience.
When software products are tested for the first time for scalability and
performance, results can be disappointing. Many times, this is due to
insufficient tuning or incorrect calculations of expected workload and system
use. If not addressed promptly and properly, this can impact the value
realized from the software and the success of projects as a whole. One
solution is to engage, early on, the services that will assist in creating proper
environment sizing and performing capacity planning. The goal is to ensure
that service level agreements (SLAs) can be met. Advanced and proactive
support services from IBM are used by our clients to address these issues,
both during implementation and for the ongoing use of the solution.

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Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
There are no resources available in the organization to perform software
deployment-related activities. These activities can include anything from
planning to software installation and governing and driving the projects that
are associated with the software. There might not be an ongoing need for
these skills in your organization. Here, it might be appropriate to use the
expertise of IBM or one of our IBM Business Partners for the current project
only.
Many business projects that use new software require quick, positive results,
or “quick wins,” to establish the value of the software to the organization.
Rapid deployment and quick wins often require the use of prior experience
and patterns of use from the vendor. The IBM “Quick Start” and accelerated
software implementation services can help. We do this by, for example,
initiating the first phase of the project quickly (thereby demonstrating product
value to shareholders).
Our most successful clients frequently engage IBM services to augment their
local expertise or to accelerate the implementation and time-to-value. IBM
services professionals know their products and can begin planning,
implementing, and integrating solutions quickly. They can also be helpful in
transferring skills to your staff, reducing the time needed to reach self-sufficiency.
Contemporary business projects and IT solutions are often a complex
architecture of products that integrate with your environment to deliver business
value. This type of software implementation is not normally self-installing,
self-calibrating, nor self-maintaining. The most efficient use of your resources is
to allow the IBM client team to provide guidance in integrating new software or
technologies into your environment.
5.3 Types of valuable IBM services for software
deployment
IBM has extensive services capabilities, which we provide a comprehensive list
of in Appendix C, “Services offerings” on page 203. Of these, we offer a subset of
services that are directly associated with obtaining value from your purchased
software. These include:
Advanced support services: These services are targeted to minimize
disruption from the implementation and operation of the software, two
components that are critical in realizing software value. When you engage
IBM for these services, we provide:
– On-site, proactive support of your associated products and processes

Chapter 5. Using IBM Services to complement your skills and accelerate value
117
– Critical performance reviews and tuning to meet your systems goals,
diagnostic assessments, and health checks, all of which enable ongoing,
smooth operations
One of the services in this category, the Accelerated Value Program (see
4.4.4, “The software Accelerated Value Program ” on page 98), is highly
recommended as a best practice towards getting value from your software.
Services in this category are available primarily from the IBM Software
Services and Global Technology Services organizations (see 5.5, “Services
organizations” on page 125).
Education services: IBM offers a comprehensive portfolio of technical training
and education services. These services are designed to ensure that you
acquire, maintain, and optimize the skills needed to realize software value.
Appendix C, “Services offerings” on page 203 is dedicated to this important
services category, and explains our range of free and paid offerings to help
you with building critical skills. Services in this category are available primarily
from the IBM Software Services and Global Technology Services
organizations (see 5.5, “Services organizations” on page 125).
Accelerated deployment of products and solution sets: A great way to quickly
realize the value of software is to implement a first phase deployment with
one of our “Quick Start” or “Rapid Deployment Service” offerings and
methodologies. These can be helpful when local access to software skill
resources is limited, as certain offerings are largely remote. More information
about these offerings can be found in 5.4, “Services offerings specific to
software deployment” on page 118. Services in this category are available
primarily from the IBM Software Services and Global Technology Services
organizations (see 5.5, “Services organizations” on page 125).
Solution design services: It is well understood that gaining value from
software is no accident. Key solution design services, such as project
scoping, architecture and design planning, and reviews, Deployment
Readiness Assessments, application reviews, and migration assessments,
are key factors in making the IT solution fit the business need. The services in
this category are customized to your needs, and are available primarily from
our Global Business Services®, IBM Software Services, and Global
Technology Services organizations (see 5.5, “Services organizations” on
page 125).
Services of an IBM enterprise deployment manager or deployment architect:
There is a growing use of longer term enterprise license agreements and
longer term integrator led projects to implement software and business
transformation together as one project. For this, IBM has developed offerings
aimed at maintaining software vendor dedication to the success of the
deployment. A discussion of the “IBM enterprise deployment manager” on
page 25 describes this role. Many of our successful enterprise license
agreement software customers keep these resources, for example, an IBM

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Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
enterprise deployment manager or deployment architect, from IBM Software
Services. This is to maintain a sustained focus on getting value from the
enterprise license agreement. These services are primarily available from the
IBM Software Services team (see 5.5, “Services organizations” on page 125).
Occasionally, these services are available as part of the Accelerated Value
Program (see 4.4.4, “The software Accelerated Value Program ” on page 98).
Implementation services: This category covers the technical skills needed to
deliver traditional services, such as software installation, configuration, and
customization. Vendor resources can often add value to your team with their
direct, current product knowledge and their access to the IBM network of
experience. Services in this category are available primarily from the IBM
Software Services and Global Technology Services groups, or part of Global
Business Services’ systems integration engagements (see 5.5, “Services
organizations” on page 125).
Consultancy and integration services: In the context of a large business
transformation project, a world class system integrator and business
consulting services firm might be required to take overall control. The scope
of this book is not to address program management of this scale, but we
acknowledge here the importance of quality business consulting and
integration skills in the implementation of your software. These services are
provided by Global Business Services (see 5.5, “Services organizations” on
page 125). More information about the capabilities of Global Business
Services is located in Appendix C, “Services offerings” on page 203.
5.4 Services offerings specific to software deployment
With the IBM extensive range of services offerings, we want you to be aware of
those that are most significant for deployment projects. We highlight the
Accelerated Value Program, deployment resources, and the Rapid Deployment
Service here, and accentuate these with a case study.
5.4.1 Accelerated Value Program and deployment management case
study
A great example of the value of IBM Services offerings is demonstrated by a
real-life, single case study, involving an organization we will call JDM. JDM took
advantage of the Accelerated Value Program offering for software deployment
needs. (For an overview of this program, see 4.4.4, “The software Accelerated
Value Program ” on page 98.)

Chapter 5. Using IBM Services to complement your skills and accelerate value
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Business context
JDM is a major user of IBM mainframe and IBM middleware software. The
increase in mainframe use is due to a number of factors, including the global
financial crisis, which increased the demand on JDM services.
JDM recently completed the first phase of an IT Next Generation program. This
program represented a more than five-year commitment to improving service
delivery by providing technology to support self-service options. JDM elected to
acquire and deploy WebSphere and Rational software to deliver the major
functionality of the IT Next Generation program.
The IT Next Generation program improves JDM’s technical system foundations,
including:
Infrastructure that will allow the introduction of a wide range of self-service
options, reducing the need for over-the-counter services
Improving internal and external security and access to systems
Removing stresses to increase system availability
Enhancing hardware and software to support data exchange, third party
transactions, and stability of systems
Upgrading connectivity, platforms, and systems to support faster and
increased capability
To-date, the IT Next Generation program has moved into phase 2, supporting the
next steps in their business transformation journey.
IBM offerings used
JDM engaged IBM services for implementation assistance, taking advantage of
an extensive list of IBM products over the five-year span of the project. These
products included:
Establishment of a Rational application development environment
Establishment of a WebSphere and WebSphere Portal infrastructure
Development of J2EE applications for access through the web
Deployment of an internal staff portal
Deployment of an external customer portal, including authentication using
IBM Tivoli Federated Identity Manager
Implementation of DataPower® boxes
Deployment of other portals

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Deployment of IBM WebSphere Process Server and IBM FileNet® Business
Process Manager (BPM) for scanned documents, for the development of a
claim processing function
Implementation of Cognos®
Expansion of IBM WebSphere Process Server and IBM FileNet BPM to
support more processing claim types
Implement monitoring by IBM Tivoli to monitor IBM WebSphere, IBM
WebSphere Portal and IBM WebSphere Process Server environments
To deliver this capability, JDM engaged in an IBM enterprise agreement, and a
number of service offerings were specified:
IBM Software Group services: to assist in the deployment of new and
enhanced technologies
IBM Global Business Services: for application infrastructure and development
activities
IBM Global Technology Services: for mainframe-related infrastructure
activities
An extensive Accelerated Value Program for proactive software management
that can include up to six IBM resources, supplemented with a number of field
service engineer days
JDM also engaged a full-time enterprise deployment architect and an IBM
enterprise deployment manager
Value gained
JDM regularly presents at IBM customer conferences and events, describing
how the offerings from the IBM software and services groups helped them to
achieve their goals and objectives. JDM often recognized the value that the
Accelerated Value Program and an IBM enterprise deployment manager brought
to their organization. These resources helped JDM to demonstrate a high level of
deployment of purchased software and a high rate of return on business projects.
Since approximately 2002 when JDM purchased the Accelerated Value Program,
this program has been a key service. As JDM’s belief in the value of the program
grew, their service from IBM grew from one person to six persons.
The IBM enterprise deployment manager and IBM enterprise deployment
architect roles were originally intended as short-term agreements. JDM values
the direct focus these roles provided in realizing value from the enterprise license
agreement, and these roles continued as part of the enterprise license
agreement since 2002. These roles also ensured a minimal need for license
compliance reviews or audits because IBM enterprise deployment managers

Chapter 5. Using IBM Services to complement your skills and accelerate value
121
have full visibility and an agreed tracking process with JDM for all license use,
with a focus on ensuring value to the client for every piece of software they
maintain. JDM states the value proposition of the Accelerated Value Program as
that it:
Helps manage existing deployments with the proactive management of
support calls
Offers advice about strategic direction in the Accelerated Value Program team
product specialty areas
Provides a flexible model to obtain key technical resources, when needed, in
periods of high demand
5.4.2 Rapid Deployment Services: A new approach to getting your
deployment kick-started
Rapid Deployment Services is a new services offering that is designed to kick
start software deployment. The Rapid Deployment Services difference is that it
utilizes:
A library of previously built solutions for specific software combinations
A Central Delivery Team that develops the installation packages off site for the
client’s environment
A cloud-based test environment to ensure quality before on-site, production
installation
In a traditional, labor-based service delivery model, middleware deployment is
dependent on each individual SME to install, configure, and test their individual
component, brought together for integration and testing as part of the project
whole. This often follows a pattern of inserting disks, installing software,
configuring software, addressing issues and failures, uninstalling and reinstalling
software (potentially multiple times), re-configuring, integrating, and testing. This
process can be repeated by each subject matter or product specialist expert.
Manual deployment and configuration of middleware infrastructure is highly
inefficient, time consuming, expensive, and prone to errors.
In contrast, Rapid Deployment Services follows an automated middleware
deployment capability consisting of:
Library of middleware assets:
– Pre-built and preconfigured to IBM best practices
– Modular and repeatable in nature
Automation tools:
– Accelerate asset construction and deployment

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Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
– Global Technology Services field developed and proven
– Internal methodology known as the Simple Product iNstaller
Delivery methodology:
– Established global delivery support by the Central Delivery Team:
• Phase 1 (Local): Draft the build sheet, capture parameters
• Phase 2 (Central Delivery Team): Build the asset, package
construction and testing
• Phase 3 (Local): Deploy the package, run automated scripts
Figure 5-1 illustrates these implementation services graphically.
Figure 5-1 Implementation services by phase
This service is designed to integrate with your internal team and is in support of
the IBM Software Services group and Business Partners in providing this service
to you. The model allows on-site delivery self-sufficiency in Phase 1 with three
services and engagement of Central Delivery Team shared services in Phase 2.

Chapter 5. Using IBM Services to complement your skills and accelerate value
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Benefits of Rapid Deployment Services
The potential benefits of using Rapid Deployment Services in your
implementation are:
Speed: The Rapid Deployment Services process has the potential to use
pre-existing assets to complete the implementation quickly
Quality of implementation: Using a Central Delivery Team with product
experience can help in situations where local skills are not available for the
software or solution, and therefore increase the quality of the implementation
Rapid Delivery Service is an offering from IBM Global Technology Services.
For more information about Rapid Deployment Services, speak with your IBM
representative or visit:
http://www-935.ibm.com/services/us/index.wss/offering/its/u116523t54994
s53
5.4.3 Proof of Concept
A Proof of Concept (PoC) is a short-term engagement between you and IBM that
is normally a paid service. A PoC is often delivered by a mix of IBM pre-sale
specialists and services specialists to deliver a more comprehensive capability
than simple pre-sales Proof of Technology. POC is primarily used as a
risk
mitigation tool
to test uncertain, client-specific functionality before moving
towards full project scope. The PoC is an extension of the POT, which covers
basic product or solution functionality.
A Proof of Concept is most valuable to you as an environment that demonstrates
how the key solution components will work in your specific and unique situations,
and often addresses integration points with other applications or specific
workload or user interface proof points.
PoCs are not a full pilot solution designed for production use and, therefore, are
not installed in your production environments, but must reflect the actual
complexity or integration points from your production environment that are being
tested.
The PoC is conducted by a team of IBM SMEs, which provides an excellent
opportunity for discussing complex and technical matters with SMEs. It is also a
time for getting hands-on mentoring about the use of the product. A PoC
generally lasts from one to three weeks, depending on the products involved and
the scenarios executed. Although it is unlikely that a single PoC will address all
aspects of the IBM software purchased or considered for purchase, the PoC is
extremely beneficial.

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When a PoC takes place
A PoC is generally undertaken in situations where a Proof of Technology (PoT)
does not demonstrate specific integration or context needs in your environment.
Most of the time, a PoT demonstrates that the technology is capable of the
required function, so a PoC is only recommended and proposed by us if further
or longer term proof points are required. It is expected that, before any PoC is
undertaken, you make yourself aware of the product capabilities as much as
possible using brochures, presentations, and product demos from our teams,
and after you have participated in introductory training in the technology.
General PoC best practices
A PoC is a significant investment from you, so IBM treats a PoC as a functioning
project, requiring that the management of the project be taken seriously. There
are several best practices we recommend and follow in our PoC engagements. A
brief outline of these best practices follows:
Clear success criteria and requirements: Ensure that the criteria for PoC
success are clearly stated in a PoC Document of Understanding, agreed
upon between IBM and you.
Avoid scope creep.
Develop a test plan: Develop a test plan prior to the PoC development to
compare results against the success criteria. A member of your team must
have ownership of the test plan, with that person responsible for updating it as
the PoC progresses. The test plan serves as a daily status, clearly indicating
progress to the IBM and client teams.
Roles and responsibilities: Clearly define PoC preparation and execution
roles and responsibilities. Make sure that roles and responsibilities are clearly
defined in the PoC Document of Understanding.
Logistics: Ensure that all necessary logistics are covered in the PoC
Document of Understanding, which might include:
– Providing root access to computer equipment
– Providing user IDs and passwords
– Providing hardware in support of an agreed upon PoC topology
– Providing PoC support resources
– Providing product installation media
Execution topology: Clearly define the PoC execution topology, and make
sure that it is appropriate for a PoC (for example, it cannot be executed in a
Quality Assurance environment).
If the PoC success criteria require that a load be driven against the
environment, ensure that appropriate consideration to components and
network have been given to allow for testing of that aspect, implementing
dedicated environments where appropriate.

Chapter 5. Using IBM Services to complement your skills and accelerate value
125
Product maintenance: Apply the latest product maintenance. Unless there is
a known reason not to do so, apply the latest maintenance releases on each
product associated with the PoC.
Communications: The plan must ensure that an IBM expert from the PoC
team is always available for you when you are using the PoC environment.
Timing of POC: Avoid long-running, overlapping, or split PoCs. If a PoC is
planned to take more than two weeks, consider rescoping, as we have
experienced that PoCs that last longer than two weeks are too broadly
scoped for consistent success.
Maintain resource stability: During the PoC, do not pause a PoC project in the
middle. The context switching costs of a split PoC among different
practitioners and time frames can greatly reduce the probability of achieving
the outcome you desire.
Performance: Performance is not an afterthought for a PoC. If performance is
a significant part of the evaluation criteria, it might be better that it is scoped
and planned as its own PoC.
5.5 Services organizations
IBM offers a diverse range of IT solutions and products and built specialized units
within the organization to support that diversity. As a result, there are services
capability groups that address each of these disciplines. The services
organizations you will most likely be involved with during your relationship with
IBM are:
IBM Global Business Services
http://www-935.ibm.com/services/us/gbs/consulting/
Global Business Services is the business consulting and Systems Integration
group of IBM that delivers integrated business solutions that customers need
to compete in a globally integrated enterprise. This group is the world's
largest group of IT consultancy services. Global Business Services has
expertise across many industries, helping companies to capitalize on new
business models, reengineer core processes, implement packaged solutions,
and create management systems to help you manage top projects. IBM
Global Business Services can help you to use the latest capabilities to
optimize business performance and deliver higher value. All of the IBM Global
Business Services business lines provide access to a full range of technical
and business solutions.
Refer to Appendix, “Global Business Services” on page 209 for specific
information about Global Business Services offerings.

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IBM Software Services
http://www-01.ibm.com/software/sw-services/?cm_re=masthead-_-itservi
ces-_-software
IBM Software Services is a team of highly skilled consultants with broad
architectural knowledge, deep technical skills, and best practice expertise.
Engaging this team grants you access to some of the deepest product,
consulting, and training skills in the world. Software Services has close
relationships with our development labs, ensuring that you have access to the
latest technologies over the life of your project. The experts in this group focus
exclusively on providing technical services, training for IBM solutions, and
integrating other supported platforms to help you use your solution as quickly
and as fully as possible. With an IBM technical expert by your side, you can
minimize your risk, maximize your investment, and meet your business goals.
Software Services is also known as IBM Lab Services in select countries.
Refer to Appendix, “IBM Software Services” on page 204 for specific
information about Global Business Services offerings.
IBM Global Technology Services
http://www-935.ibm.com/services/us/index.wss
Global Technology Services helps clients to reduce costs, improve
productivity, and assert their competitive advantage with a comprehensive
portfolio of assessment, outsourcing, infrastructure, and systems integration
services. They also offer innovative rapid deployment services for IBM
software.
Refer to Appendix, “Global Technology Services” on page 210 for specific
information about Global Business Services offerings.
IBM Systems and Technology Group Lab Services
http://www-03.ibm.com/systems/services/labservices/index.html
The IBM hardware division is known as the Systems and Technology Group.
This group has its own services organization, focused on deployment and
value from the hardware solutions and their integration to software. The
Systems and Technology Group Lab Services helps to infuse intelligence in
the way the world’s information technology works. They focus on driving down
costs by designing flexible infrastructures, while, simultaneously, managing
risk through the use of deep technical skills and training expertise.
Refer to Appendix, “Systems and Technology Group Lab Services” on
page 211 for specific information about Global Business Services offerings.

Chapter 5. Using IBM Services to complement your skills and accelerate value
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5.6 Conclusions and recommendations
The value of engaging IBM as a services partner in key areas can bring real
results and enhancements to your project value. This chapter demonstrates
specific areas in which IBM services can and have accelerated the deployment of
software and value to organizations. In summary, engaging IBM services can
have the following benefits to you:
Fastest path to value
Delivery methodology and templates that help to accelerate project schedules
and reduce risk
Services offerings that foster adoption
Ongoing self-sufficiency of your organization by skills development
Education and training by role and function
Flexible engagement models to optimize your access to expertise, while
retaining a low total cost of ownership
Direct access and collaboration with IBM product development labs
For any major implementation of IBM software, we do recommend the following
set of offerings as the best set to invest in for project success. Consider whether
each one is appropriate for your instance, and discuss them with your IBM
representative:
Accelerated Value Program: To provide advanced product support and
proactive, on-site engagement from the IBM support management team (see
4.4.4, “The software Accelerated Value Program ” on page 98).
IBM deployment managers and deployment architects: These resources help
you with the governance of software deployment projects, and provide
ongoing advice and information about realizing value from purchased
software. This is particularly recommended for enterprise license agreement
software purchases, where a longer term, multi-project software entitlement
was procured.
Education assessment and planning: We recommend that you engage IBM to
perform an assessment of your education and training needs. as these can
determine which investments are needed for enablement of your organization
(see 6.3, “Portfolio of training offerings” on page 132).
Software implementation quick starts or accelerated deployment services:
These methodologies can get first phase and quick win implementations
underway.
Key skills resources: Architects, key technical implementation resources,
project managers, industry-specific solution skills, and business consultants

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are critical skills and talents for projects. They can be sourced from your
integration partner or IBM Services teams.
As a final note on the topic of services, IBM service offerings and the structure of
the IBM services organizations can and do change. Be sure to visit the IBM
website for the latest information.

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2011. All rights reserved.
129
Chapter 6.
Building self-sufficiency
using training
6

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Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
6.1 What this chapter is about
A significant part of your software deployment and implementation strategy is to
arm your team with the necessary skill sets for your environment. Depending on
your approach for each project, you can elect to use the services of IBM, such as
technical or integration services, or perhaps those of one of our IBM Business
Partners. Ultimately, the deployed products must be supported by your
organization.
One of the most effective accelerators for gaining value from software
deployment in the short term and long term is investing in training your team. Ask
yourself, as does Figure 6-1, if your skills are ready for what is ahead.
Figure 6-1 Investing in training is one of the most effective software deployment accelerators
To be self-sufficient, a team must be developed so that it has the right blend of
skills and experiences to act independently of the IBM support and services
teams. Training can be obtained by knowledge transfer from any deployment
services you have engaged, or by participating in formal training from IBM.
6.2 Required skill sets
To ensure that you have a comprehensive training strategy in place, consider the
skill sets that we discuss in this section. For any that are out-of-date or lacking,
IBM has training and educational offerings to assist, as described in 6.3,
“Portfolio of training offerings” on page 132.

Chapter 6. Building self-sufficiency using training
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6.2.1 Implementation skills
Implementation skills include knowledge of product installation and configuration.
Your implementation plans might indicate that initial installation will be contracted
to an external provider. However, a certain amount of internal team knowledge of
software installation and configuration is critical to the success of the project.
Training must include specific platform and version considerations and
integration with other IBM or third party software.
6.2.2 Technical administration and operations skills
Administration and operations training sessions for your support team are other
components of project success. Certain software products and systems that
interact with deployed products require ongoing administration, tuning, and
maintenance to maintain high-level performance and availability based on
Service Level Agreements (SLAs).
6.2.3 User training
The value of software implementation is normally associated with functional and
business requirements that describe the tasks to be carried out by users and how
to do so. For a newly-implemented system, users require training to develop a
comfort level with the technology, the system, and the processes. A few
enablement sessions, on-site training, or other transition tools address these
needs.
IBM offers a comprehensive portfolio of technical training services that are
designed for individuals, companies, and public organizations to acquire,
maintain, and optimize their IT skills. The IBM training portfolio includes both free
and paid offerings. There are both standard and customized training programs
available. The entire portfolio of training offerings is summarized as follows and
depicted in Figure 6-2 on page 132:
Free training programs and tools
Standard classroom training
Distance learning
IBM software conferences and events
Customized training

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Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
Figure 6-2 Depiction of the IBM training portfolio
To learn more about these and other training opportunities available to you, visit:
http://www-01.ibm.com/software/sw-training/
6.3 Portfolio of training offerings
In this section, we provide an overview of standard and customized training that
is available from IBM. Links are provided, where applicable.
6.3.1 Free training programs and tools
IBM offers a number of training tools that are free of charge. We discuss these
tools in this section.
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Chapter 6. Building self-sufficiency using training
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IBM seminars and product roadshows
Scheduled throughout the year, roadshows offer you the opportunity to speak
with IBM product experts. Recent roadshows include
Impact Comes to You
and
LotusSphere Comes to You
. For more information, speak with your local IBM
representative or, for a list of current seminars and roadshows, visit:
https://www-304.ibm.com/jct03001c/services/learning/ites.wss/zz/en?page
Type=page&c=a0011023
Brand or product-specific web programs
Worldwide web training tutorials are available for multiple product offerings at:
http://www-01.ibm.com/software/sw-training/
DeveloperWorks website
This forum for development and IT professionals is of particular value, providing
podcasts on software products. Visit:
http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/
IBM Redbooks
IBM Redbooks publications are developed and published by the IBM
International Technical Support Organization (ITSO), which develops and
delivers skills, technical knowledge, and materials to IBM technical professionals,
Business Partners, clients, and the marketplace in general. Typically, Redbooks
publications provide positioning and value guidance, installation, and
implementation processes, typical solution scenarios, and step-by-step
instructions. They often include sample code and other support materials that are
available as downloads. Visit:
http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/
Mentoring from IBM sales and technical specialists
Your IBM client team is a valuable resource, interested in maintaining a
relationship with you in support of your deployment efforts. The IBM sales and
technical specialists are not substitutes for skilled deployment resources, but are
a valuable learning resource in understanding product value and positioning,
features, and solution fit.
User groups
Many of our clients around the world have built user groups or communities of
practice for our solutions. Your local IBM software sales representative might be
able to connect you to one of these client-run and client-delivered groups.

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Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
IBM Product Information Centers
The Product Information Centers are a modern approach to product information.
Information Centers provide a powerful online interface for finding technical
information about a product offering or product solution that:
Helps you plan, install, configure, use, tune, monitor, troubleshoot, and
maintain products
Contains reference materials, such as product commands, parameters, and
system values
For more details, visit:
http://www.ibm.com/support/publications/us/library/index.shtml
IBM Education Assistant
This is a collection of multimedia training modules that are designed to help you
gain a better understanding of IBM software products and to use them more
effectively to meet business requirements. Modules consist of multiple types of
content, such as:
Presentations that provide an overview of a product or technology or a more
in-depth look at a particular product component or feature. These are
available in Flash (many with audio) and PDF formats.
Demonstrations that show you how to complete a specific task or
configuration. They provide background information to help you understand
the available options. Available in Flash format.
Tutorials on an array of topics. Each tutorial includes all of the files necessary
to complete a practice lab scenario in your environment.
For more details about the IBM Education Assistant, visit:
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/bpcsamp/index.html
6.3.2 Standard classroom training
The IBM hardware and IBM software divisions have a comprehensive portfolio of
standard training offerings, ranging from product awareness to detailed technical
training with certification. The IBM Education Group schedules many of these as
regularly available courses in many countries. Many of our IBM-certified
Business Partners also offer a range of training offerings for IBM software. For
more information, visit IBM Training Guaranteed to Run Classes at:
https://www-304.ibm.com/jct03001c/services/learning/ites.wss/us/en?page
Type=page&c=B768303T50066D41

Chapter 6. Building self-sufficiency using training
135
Training paths
To assist you in planning your training needs, IBM developed training paths.
These paths are designed to help you navigate through the training and other
resources that are available for IBM software and hardware products and
solutions.
Information about these training paths is located at:
http://www-304.ibm.com/jct03001c/services/learning/ites.wss/au/en?pageT
ype=page&c=a0011935
As an example, if you are implementing data warehouse software, we suggest
the training path shown in Figure 6-3 on page 136.
For our online course catalog, see:
http://www-304.ibm.com/jct03001c/services/learning/ites.wss/us/en?pageT
ype=page&c=a0000037

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Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
Figure 6-3 The IBM training path for those interested in implementing data warehouse software

Chapter 6. Building self-sufficiency using training
137
6.3.3 Distance learning or e-Learning
Train without limits. Learn at your own pace or in a real-time, web-based
classroom with peers around the world. Either on its own or as a complement to
classroom instruction, IBM e-learning gives you maximum control over your
training. Our available e-learning formats follow.
Instructor-led online training in a virtual classroom
IBM offers live classroom instruction, complete with instructor-student
interactivity, delivered to your desktop. Instructor-led online (ILO) courses are
taught live on a prescheduled day and time. Most courses are exactly the same
as their classroom equivalent, including the course duration, content, and
student materials. To connect to a class, a broadband Internet connection is the
only requirement. This offer allows you to connect to the virtual classroom and
interact directly with your instructor and peers. Several benefits of ILO training
are:
No travel costs or travel time
Same content as the classroom version of the course
Live instructor with whom you can interact and ask questions using Voice over
IP (VoIP)
Modest connectivity requirements let you participate from anywhere
Thin-client implementation for easy system preparation
Hands-on labs reinforce the concepts learned
Classes can be scheduled after business hours to minimize time away from
work
For more information about ILO training, visit the IBM online training site at:
http://www-304.ibm.com/jct03001c/services/learning/ites.wss/us/en?pageT
ype=page&c=a0013864
Self-paced virtual training
Self-Paced Virtual Classes (SPVCs) include web-based assignments, hands-on
labs, and interactions with instructors through the IBM Learner Portal. SPVCs
allow you to take part in classes on your own schedule, while having the same
content, interactive exercises, and hands-on labs as our instructor-led classroom
training sessions. Quizzes are incorporated to provide students with feedback on
comprehension of the material. These classes let you take control of your
training, because you participate when and where it is convenient for you. Get
the high-quality content and instructor-led support of traditional classroom
training, without the time and cost of travel.

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Benefits of SPVCs include:
Flexibility to train at your own pace
Training from your desktop
Courses and labs are available 24x7
High-quality content
No travel costs
Lower training costs
Modular and scalable lessons
Module-based quizzes
Interactive and prescriptive training
Delivers the same content, exercises, and hands-on labs as in the classroom
Instructors are included virtually, through recorded lectures and
demonstrations
Hands-on labs use actual IBM products
Basic online training
Individual students learn at their own pace, at their desktop, with totally
self-contained courses that are available as single titles or as curriculum bundles.
Self-paced, web-based training is available on demand and is offered in single
titles, collections, or libraries, such that, when you purchase a course, you have
access to many more for a full year. For more information, visit:
http://www.ibm.com/training/us/elearning
Several benefits of self-paced online training are:
Courses are self-directed and self-paced, all from your desktop
Available as single titles, collections, or libraries
Purchase a course that is part of a collection or library, and gain access to
many more for a full year
Lower training costs
No travel time

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The IBM Education Pack
The IBM Education Pack is a prepaid discount program that gives your technical
staff access to the IBM top-notch classroom training at a competitive price. It is
ideal for companies that need to train multiple employees on limited budgets. The
IBM Education Pack can be used for:
Most public courses in more than two dozen curriculum areas (course
description online denotes eligibility)
Most IBM Technical Conferences
On-site training, including tuition, mentoring, instructor travel and traveling
expenses, equipment charges, and room rentals
Most ILO and self-paced virtual classes
Although pricing varies by country, the IBM Education Pack’s global availability
lets you save money on training, wherever your people work. For information and
conditions, visit the IBM Education Pack website at:
https://www-304.ibm.com/jct03001c/services/learning/ites.wss/us/en?page
Type=page&c=B768303T50066D41
6.3.4 Customized training
We also offer tailored training programs and training plans that are specific to
your needs. Dedicated training can be delivered at your facility or ours. You have
the option to purchase customized, dedicated training to better fit your training
requirements. We also provide mentored workshops that are tailored for more
specialized situations. In this style of training, the instructor presents the
concepts and content in lecture and lab settings. The material is generally
reinforced by examples, and worked on either individually or in teams. In most
cases, the attendees are from a single project team, or of the same discipline in
the company. Because of this, the material and examples can be tailored to
reflect the team's domain. In cases where the material and examples remain
generic (a cost trade-off), classroom discussions are used to explore the
domain-specific application of the examples and concepts.
Customized offerings are normally developed using a five-step method, as
shown in Figure 6-4 on page 140.

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Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
Figure 6-4 Five steps of IBM customized training
To develop your customized training, we first assess your needs. Our consultants
work closely with you to understand your business objectives. Based on this
assessment, we design a complete learning plan. With the design agreed to by
you, we develop the specific content, through to completion.
The final step in the process is to consider your maintenance program. In this
stage, we examine the ongoing training that might be required to support the
system. We also examine the ongoing training that the team might need, for
example, for updates in technology, or for projected changes and growth within
your teams. This approach ensures that the customized training is going to
deliver value to the deployment project, and that all of your training needs are
considered in the plan.
Any of our scheduled IT and professional courses can be tailored to your
environment. Browse our course catalog for available content. We can then
discuss how a customized training program will meet your needs.
Customized training assessments, design, and development are a paid services
offering from IBM. Contact your IBM software sales representative to obtain more
information, or visit:
http://www-304.ibm.com/jct03001c/services/learning/ites.wss/au/en?pageT
ype=page&c=a0012026
6.3.5 IBM software conferences and events
Another form of training is our major Software Customer Conferences. IBM
software offers customer conferences each year that focus on specific, major
categories of software. Events, such as Lotusphere®, Information on Demand,
Tivoli PULSE, IMPACT, and Rational Innovate, are great opportunities to learn
about our technology, our strategies for the future, and to meet with IBM and
other customers of those solutions.
As se ss
D es ign
De ve lop
Del ive r
M ai nt ain
Un d er s t an d Y o u r Le a rn in g I s s u e s
D e s ig n Y o ur T r ai ni ng S ol ut i on
De v el op Y ou r C ou rs e Co n t en t
P ro v id e On g o in g T ra in in g Su p po rt
De li v er Yo u r T ra in in g

Chapter 6. Building self-sufficiency using training
141
Typically, these events are run annually at a global level with predetermined
agendas. Events last up to one week and are attended by thousands of
customers. Attending conferences and events gives you an opportunity to:
See the latest strategy and announcements to the product portfolio
Attend many sessions and tracks designed to build your product knowledge
and product use cases
Meet with IBM product executives and developers
Attend sessions delivered by other clients, outlining their successful use of
IBM products
Meet and compare implementation strategies with other IBM software clients
Contribute feedback to IBM development on the direction of our products and
portfolio
Take part in Business Leadership Forums
Browse through Solution Showcase areas that highlight IBM and our
Business Partner offerings
Explore our offerings that are specific to your industry by participating in
industry-focused sessions
Our events can also include exclusive opportunities for our larger customers to
be part of the feedback to our product development.
Highlights of these major client conferences are often offered as local events in
your own country, for example, Lotusphere Comes to You is an annual roadshow
event that occurs in several countries. This event allows for a subset of the
Lotusphere conference sessions to be attended within your own city or country.
For more information, speak with your local IBM representative. For a
comprehensive list of conferences and events, visit the IBM Events Calendar at:

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© Copyright IBM Corp. 2011. All rights reserved.
143
Chapter 7.
The value of maintaining
IBM Software Subscription
and Support (S&S)
7

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Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
7.1 What this chapter is about
The IBM Software Support Center offers Subscription and Support (S&S)
services to ensure that you receive the most from your current software. S&S
provides you with ongoing access to the latest versions of your software and
access to software support assistance both by telephone and electronically.
When you purchase IBM software, a period of S&S is normally included in the
purchase price, typically for up to two years. At the end of that period, and each
year thereafter, IBM offers to renew the S&S contract for a fee.
IBM software products undergo continuous development, adding improvement in
functionality, new integration features, and changes that take advantage of new
technologies. An S&S package from IBM software helps to ensure that you can
take advantage of these continuing developments and helps to answer questions
on the use of the product.
Without S&S coverage, IBM cannot support your critical business systems;
therefore, the impact on your business is increased. IBM requires that you
maintain S&S on every copy of each software license you intend to continue
using, and we do not provide free support from our sales or pre-sales technical
community in place of an S&S agreement.
In certain cases, such as for certain enterprise license agreements
1
, a longer
term of S&S is included in the annual contract fee for the term of the agreement.
Speak with your IBM software sales representative to understand the
arrangements that apply to you for S&S renewal.
See Chapter 7, “The value of maintaining IBM Software Subscription and
Support (S&S)” on page 143 for more information about engaging effectively with
customer support.
7.2 Software support offerings from IBM
The IBM Software Support Center provides software licenses to our customers
for three different programs:
Passport Advantage: A license program for IBM software that is not on the
mainframe z-Series platform. This is also known as distributed software.
Passport Advantage is a comprehensive IBM offering that covers software
license acquisition, product upgrades, and technical support under a single,
common set of agreements, processes, and tools. To ensure that you
1
Refer to Appendix A, “The IBM Enterprise License Agreement” on page 187

Chapter 7. The value of maintaining IBM Software Subscription and Support (S&S)
145
continue to have access to the latest version of software and technical
support, S&S is included in the initial Passport Advantage license acquisition
for all distributed software products. It is renewable on an annual basis. A
small business version is also available, called Passport Advantage Express.
Mainframe One-Time Charge license: One-Time Charge license agreements
are similar to the Passport Advantage program. These agreements have a
separate S&S offering that, if acquired, provides for product support and
access to future releases and versions. The S&S is then renewable on an
annual basis.
Mainframe Monthly License Charge: A Monthly License Charge agreement is
a monthly rental agreement for the use of the license, and includes the
support component in the monthly charge. The support program for these
licenses is known as Program Services and support for most System z
(S/390®, zSeries) products includes problem support for defects in IBM code
and publications, available by telephone and electronic access. IBM provides
the remote technical specialists necessary to resolve defects in the majority of
our mainframe products at no additional cost to you. Support for critical IBM
defect problems is available 24x7. These agreements can have fixed terms
and specify the quantity cap of each license that is covered. S&S for Monthly
License Charge license software is not charged separately, and if the Monthly
License Charge payment is stopped, there is no ongoing license entitlement,
and no support.
The IBM Software Support Center provides other support in addition to
customizable options. These levels are:
Foundational level offerings: Our foundational support provides a variety of
support needs, which are:
– S&S acquired through Passport Advantage
– Software Maintenance for System p® and System i®
– Support line
– SoftwareXcel for US System z customers
Premium support options, including our Accelerated Value Program: An
enhanced customizable premium support offering, designed to add
personalized proactive and on-site support capabilities, plus attention to
software deployment planning and tracking and enhanced access to problem
solving databases.
Customized support: Additional customized services can be added, based on
your specific support needs.
Regardless of the license program that has been used for your software, S&S is
an important component to maintain your software and your business.

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7.2.1 What S&S includes
There are several types of support available for the family of IBM software
products. Figure 7-1 outlines the progression of offerings.
Figure 7-1 Types of support available with IBM Subscription and Support (S&S)
The core of the Foundation level of support includes self-help tools and S&S,
which includes voice defect support and electronic defect and Q&A support.
When you renew your S&S for distributed or mainframe software, you receive
access to:
Unlimited voice and, where available, electronic access to the IBM Software
Support Centers worldwide. So, you can contact our SSC as often as
necessary, for example:
– Voice and electronic access to report defects and ask how- to questions
– Direct to Engineering
– View and manage problem status on the Internet
– No limits on the number of IT professionals who have access
– Worldwide infrastructure support in native languages and time zones
DistributedMainframe
Self Help
Subscription and Support
Program
Services
Support Line
SoftwareXcel
Acc elerated
Value
Program (AVP)
Custom Support
Premium Support
Foundation
Elements
Electronic Defect and Q&A Support
Voice Defect Support
Product Updates and Fix Packs
Enhanced
Tec hnical
Support (ETS)

Chapter 7. The value of maintaining IBM Software Subscription and Support (S&S)
147
– Self help plus access to our web site for enhanced online support
– Remote problem determination and resolution during normal country
business hours
– Download interim fixes and fix packs
– Search for Technotes, Authorized Program Analysis Reports and other
product and technical information to assist with technical questions
– Receive weekly email updates about flashes and fixes that can be enabled
using the My Support function on our website
– The ability to assign an IBM site technical contact who maintains a list of
technical staff members who are authorized to submit and view problem
records. Assist-On-Site, worldwide distributed service that allows for
Internet-based, remote control to assist clients in real-time
– Access to product updates, including productivity and performance
updates
– Security updates
– Ongoing client communications about incident resolution activities
– Assistance with understanding documentation
– Assistance with gathering analyzing traces and dumps
– Installation, usage and basic product configuration assistance, for
example, product compatibility and interoperability
– Provide available configuration samples
– Technical database searches
– Customized and proactive product notification of important information
through the My Support web page
Emergency support, available 24x7 for Severity 1 issues, those critical to your
business. Severity 2 through Severity 4 incidents are covered during
agreed-upon business hours in your country. See 8.3.1, “Understanding
severity levels ” on page 156.
Our upgrade guarantee for no-cost access to new releases and
enhancements as they roll out. This means you always have the most
up-to-date versions of the software you rely on each day.
Trade-up options and pricing, making it feasible for you to keep up with
changing business needs.
7.2.2 Other support offerings
In this section, we discuss other support offerings.

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Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
Self-help tools
The IBM Software Support Center also provides self-help tools and resources to
help you use IBM software products successfully. Self-help tools are offered as
part of the software support contract. General self-help capabilities include
features, such as:
Basic search capability for:
– IBM software defects, that is, closed Authorized Program Analysis Reports
– Software fixes
– Technotes for resolved issues
Information about how to purchase software support
Marketing information, such as product overviews, newsletters, Redbooks,
white papers, and product announcement letters
Technical information, such as Redbooks and white papers
Links to education and training information
The IBM Support Assistant Tool is a complimentary software offering which
provides you with a workbench to help with problem determination. With a
focus on finding key information quickly, automating repetitive steps, and
arming you with a variety of serviceability tools, you will be prepared for
self-analysis and diagnosis of problems and a faster time to resolution. To
download this tool, visit:
http://www.ibm.com/software/support/isa
Support Line
For mainframes, the Support Line offering provides support for those operating
systems and associated products that are not available with the Passport
Advantage S&S or software maintenance offerings. Having S&S, software
maintenance, and the Support Line ensures total support coverage for your
enterprise needs, including IBM and selected non-IBM products.
For more information, visit our Support Line at:
http://www-935.ibm.com/services/us/index.wss/offering/its/a1000030
The IBM SoftwareXcel for System z customers
SoftwareXcel (enterprise edition) is available in select countries. It provides:
Resolve for System z, which is the ability to report problems, routine
installation, and “how to” questions electronically
Alert for System z, which is the ability to be notified of high impact fixes
Electronic access to Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Chapter 7. The value of maintaining IBM Software Subscription and Support (S&S)
149
The ability to electronically submit routine installation and “how to” questions
and receive responses during business hours, with voice and 24x7 options
available
An optional uplift is available to allow a 24x7 response to “how to” questions
Download fixes by linking to the IBM support database
Premium response (usually less than one hour) during business hours for
suspected defect problems
Remote Screen Viewing capability:
http://www-01.ibm.com/software/support/offerings.html
For more information, visit SoftwareXcel for System z customers at:
http://www-935.ibm.com/services/us/index.wss/offering/its/a1000185
Premium Support
Premium Support offerings are services that provide both additional and
specialized support on operating systems and middleware products. Premium
Support offerings focus on the vertical depth of support. They feature a
personalized relationship with our technical experts, on-site assistance,
knowledge transfers, and horizontal breadth for multi-product and multivendor IT
environments to maximize IT infrastructure availability.
With Premium Support, you can customize an offering to include:
Proactive problem prevention and knowledge transfer
Situation management and reporting
Escalations
Account management
Assigned technical analyst
Optional or planned on-site days
Emergency on-site days
Remote technical advice hours
Event-specific after-hours support for all severities
Premium Support offerings include:
IBM Account Advocate (for U.S. customers)
IBM Enhanced Technical Support (for customers in the U.S., Canada, and
Europe)
IBM Software Accelerated Value Program for middleware products (see “The
software Accelerated Value Program ” on page 98 for more information)
IBM Advanced Support for System i and System p software (for customers in
the U.S. and Europe)

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Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
For further details about our software support offerings, see the Software
Support Handbook at:
http://www14.software.ibm.com/webapp/set2/sas/f/handbook/offerings.html
7.3 The value of S&S
7.2, “Software support offerings from IBM” on page 144 describes the extensive
offerings included with your S&S renewal. This is a key factor in obtaining value
from your IBM software. The value of S&S can be realized in several ways:
Completeness of the design: S&S entitles you to upgrade to the newest
release of each covered IBM product, ensuring that you have access to the
latest support for innovations and standards in areas, such as data access
and management, business process composition, and collaboration.
Completeness of technical implementation: Having the components of a
solution installed, configured, and running properly is key to realizing its
value. Clients with up-to-date S&S have access to usage- and code-related
voice support. So, regardless of your environment, platform, or
customizations made, we assist you in keeping all systems running in top
form.
Reliability of the solution (availability, robustness, security, and performance):
IBM products are refined by design and based on user experience. Our
ongoing investment in our products ensures that they meet and exceed our
clients’ performance and reliability expectations. If a problem is encountered,
clients with current S&S receive:
– 24/7 remote problem analysis and coverage
– Unlimited voice access to IBM Software Support Centers
– A two-hour response time
– Online tracking of your resolution process
Flexibility of the solution to meet changing business needs: As IBM adds
features to their products and makes them available, you are given access to
them. You are notified when a software upgrade is upcoming or available.
Clients can use the IBM Passport Advantage Online to download upgrades
from the web at no additional charge, as long as their software maintenance
agreement is kept current. With the IBM simple renewal processes and
flexible financing options, you save time and money.
Maintaining your S&S agreement: Remaining current on S&S is less
expensive than reinstating a lapsed agreement. The annual renewal S&S
charge is much less (approximately one third in many cases) than the cost of
re-establishing a lapsed agreement. Do not risk having to pay a high cost for
support or an upgrade you need to keep your business running at optimal

Chapter 7. The value of maintaining IBM Software Subscription and Support (S&S)
151
efficiency. See 7.4, “Keeping your software license agreements active” on
page 151.
Capacity scaling to handle variations in workload: As the business and
processes of your enterprise expand, computing capacity and the distribution
of work among servers can change. This often results in the purchase of
additional licenses for server software.
It is a considerable risk to your organization not to renew S&S. Without it, you can
miss out on important updates and needed help for maintaining the availability of
your solution. Not renewing your S&S can significantly impact the overall value of
your software investment.
7.4 Keeping your software license agreements active
An annual S&S review is a good time to confirm usage levels for installed
software. We suggest that you:
Know and validate how many copies of each IBM software product are
installed: Situations such as the reorganization of employees, workload, and
physical location often force changes in the use of software. Though actively
managed by most clients, the annual S&S renewal event is an ideal time for
our client's IT management and procurement to confirm the number of
instances of IBM licensed software in use.
Know and validate the number of licenses being billed and paid for:
Confirming that all purchased software is installed can eliminate unnecessary
expense. Purchasing needed licenses ensures that you meet your contractual
agreements. By working with the IBM renewal representative, both parties are
ensured of accurate license counts and that billing is correctly stated.
Understand and communicate your entitled rights for maintenance, upgrades,
and technical support: After licensing is up-to-date, your IT management
team can communicate, through their internal structure, the rights and
contacts for support. They can communicate which licensed software is
eligible for maintenance and new release upgrades, which ensures that
upgrades and support are available for use.
When you renew S&S for a product at a site, this is the recommended time to
renew S&S for all copies and licenses for that program at that site, no matter how
you acquired those copies. You must renew S&S for all copies and licenses of
that program for which you want technical support.

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Where applicable, S&S for both the host and the workstation licenses can be
renewed.
7.5 Conclusion
Getting value from your software involves having a support program in place that
is the most appropriate for your organization. IBM software S&S is the minimum
support level that ensures two primary objectives:
That IBM will be there to assist you when needed
That you have access to new releases for purchased products
Without S&S, you can miss out on important updates and needed help for
maintaining the availability of your solution.
Covering your license with S&S: To be authorized to upgrade your licenses
or to contact Technical Support with questions or issues, the license must be
covered by current S&S.
Software Subscription and Support Reinstatement: You are entitled to
S&S only on the licenses covered. If you need technical support coverage or
want to install a new version or release on one of the licenses with lapsed S&S
coverage, you must acquire Software Subscription and Support
Reinstatement. This is the only way to reinstate your licenses in Software
S&S.

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2011. All rights reserved.
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Chapter 8.
How to effectively engage
with IBM customer support
8

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Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
8.1 What this chapter is about
We at IBM pride ourselves on delivering world class software support from our
highly skilled, customer-focused staff. However, we realize that we cannot take
the place of your own company support staff. Many successful companies found
that the best way to interact with the IBM Software Support Center is by means of
their own specialized group of trained, highly skilled, senior staff members who
understand the organization’s environment and act in conjunction with the
organization’s internal support processes. That group can filter, sort, and
prioritize the organization’s support needs and direct each to the best resources
(either IBM or non-IBM) for resolution. These persons become the authorized
callers to IBM when support is necessary. They and the IBM support staff work
toward a fast resolution of IBM-related issues and assume a similar role with
other vendors.
We encourage you to adopt a similar structure, if you have not done so already.
This structure will also help us to promote the success of your IBM software
deployment. This type of structured support team has been shown to be the most
effective.
IBM offers three channels of access to our support services:
Telephone access
Electronic Support Service
On-site support options, such as the Accelerated Value Program
When your IBM Subscription and Support (S&S) software agreement is kept
current, you are offered full access to telephone and Electronic Support
Services. For more information about IBM S&S, see Chapter 7, “The value of
maintaining IBM Software Subscription and Support (S&S)” on page 143.
The Accelerated Value Program is an optional support package available at an
additional cost. More information about the program is located in 4.4.4, “The
software Accelerated Value Program ” on page 98.
Accessing IBM support: To access IBM support, you must have a current
support agreement. This chapter provides an overview of the IBM support
process. See the IBM support web site for further information:
http://www.ibm.com/software/support/

Chapter 8. How to effectively engage with IBM customer support
155
8.2 Response objectives and hours of operation
In this section, we discuss our objectives for responding to your support
requests.
8.2.1 Software Support Center hours
IBM Software Support Center hours cover the prevailing business hours in the
country where your product is licensed or your contract registered. There can be
exceptions for countries where Monday through Friday is not the typical work
week, or where IBM business hours are not the same as yours because you and
IBM reside in different time zones. In those cases, contact your IBM Business
Partner, reseller, or IBM software sales representative to determine your hours of
coverage.
When you contact the IBM Software Support Center to report an incident or to
check the status of an incident, your request is routed to a software support
specialist. For all distributed platform (non System z series) software incidents,
our goal is to return your call within two business hours during business hours.
For incidents that are Severity 1 (critical), our goal is to return your call within two
hours (prime and non-prime work hours).
8.2.2 Monthly License Charge and System z platform incidents
For incidents reported about Monthly License Charge software products (for
example, System z), our response objectives continue to be based upon the
severity of the request. Table 8-1 provides these objectives.
Table 8-1
Note: IBM uses reasonable efforts to respond to service calls from your
authorized callers within two hours during normal country business hours. Our
initial response can result in a resolution of your request. If not, the initial
response will form the basis for determining additional actions that are
required.
Severity Impact Response goal
1 Critical business impact Within two hours
2 Significant business impact Within four business hours
3 Some business impact By the end of the next business
day

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Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
8.2.3 Support during non-business hours
During non-business hours, we make reasonable efforts to respond, by
telephone, within two hours, to service calls that you specify as Severity 1
(critical). Normal country business hours are defined by your time zone and the
prevailing business hours in your country. For example, this might be Monday
through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. in North America and 9:00 a.m. to
6:00 p.m. in certain parts of Asia and Europe. National holidays are excluded.
Non-business hours are defined as all other hours outside of normal country
business hours. Support during non-business hours is provided in English;
however, we try to accommodate the local language when possible. An
appropriately skilled technical person from your site must be available to work
with our technical support staff during the entire time we are performing support
services outside of normal country business hours.
8.3 Before contacting the IBM Software Support Center
When you submit a support service request our goal is to resolve the issue in the
most expedient way. This involves understanding severity levels and having
information available before you contact us.
8.3.1 Understanding severity levels
The severity of the support request defines the required response time, which
lets the support team know the impact that the incident has on your business.
The response goal for a new Problem Management Record is two business
hours. Severity 1 issues are attended to 24x7 until resolved. During this time, we
expect a contact at your company to be available, if needed.
Our Severity levels are defined as:
Severity 1 Critical business impact, or system down. This condition
requires an immediate solution.
Severity 2 Significant business impact. This indicates the program is
usable but is severely limited.
4 Minimum business impact By the end of the next business
day
Severity Impact Response goal

Chapter 8. How to effectively engage with IBM customer support
157
Severity 3 Some business impact. This indicates the program is
usable but without significant features
Severity 4 Minimal business impact.
A severity level can be changed if circumstances change and the impact to
business changes as a result.
When speaking with a software support specialist, be sure to provide the
following information, as it applies:
This project is facing a deadline
Your availability (if available to work with the IBM Software Support Center
only during certain times)
Alternate methods for contacting you, such as an additional phone number,
pager, or email address
The name of an alternate, knowledgeable contact whom we can contact
about the incident (include contact details)
You have other open incidents (problem management records) with IBM that
relate to this service request
You are participating in an early support (beta) program
You have researched this situation prior to calling IBM and have detailed
information or documentation to provide which describes the incident
8.3.2 Incident information to have available before contacting
support
Before contacting IBM Support, it is important that you take the following initial
steps
before
speaking with a software support specialist. You must have certain
information available about the incident to be discussed. Here is what is required:
Severity of the issue: Issue severity is based on the impact of the issue on
your business (see 8.3.1, “Understanding severity levels ” on page 156).
Incident description: Describe the issue and any symptoms as concisely as
possible, as this assists us in expediting our support to you.
Background information: To solve incidents effectively, the software support
specialist must have all relevant information about the incident. The following
is the most important information that we need to expedite support services:
– What software and versions were you running when the incident
occurred? Include all relevant products, for example, operating system and
the version and release of the product in question.
– Has the incident occurred before, or is this an isolated occurrence?

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– What steps led to the occurrence?
– Can the incident be recreated? If so, what steps are required?
– Have any changes been made to the system, such as hardware, NetWare,
or software?
– Were any error messages or other diagnostic information displayed? If
yes, what were they? It is often helpful to have a printout of any error
messages or related error message numbers when contacting support.
Ask your technical question: Ask your question in specific terms.
8.3.3 Contact information to have available before contacting support
Before
contacting our support team, have the following contact information
available:
IBM Client Number
Company name
Contact name
Preferred means of contact (voice mail or email)
Telephone number where you can be reached
8.4 Submitting incidents electronically
As you plan, install, configure, use, and troubleshoot IBM software products, you
must locate information about some tasks. Every IBM product purchase includes
electronic support, online resources, tools, and content, available 24x7x365 to
meet your key support needs, which leads to:
Proactive incident avoidance
Faster incident resolution
Customized information delivery
Collaborative worldwide communities
Knowledge base assistance that is comprehensive and dynamic
The following list contains contact information for IBM support. For each, you
must sign in with your IBM Service ID and password:
Use our Service Request tool to open or update a hardware or
software-related Service Request or to check the status of a Service Request.
The Service Request tool is located at:
http://www-947.ibm.com/support/entry/portal/Open_service_request/Sof
tware/Software_support_%28general%29

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For help using our IBM Service Request tool or to access entitled documents
in the IBM technical support knowledge base, use the Customer Assistance
form at:
http://www.ibm.com/software/support/help-contactus.html
8.4.1 Online support
When submitting an incident using our IBM Support portal, you can post
questions to the IBM telephone support team. Prior to submitting an incident
online, you need the same information that is required when you contact IBM by
telephone (see 8.3.3, “Contact information to have available before contacting
support” on page 158). On our support pages that are located on the web, you
can enter the pertinent information into the incident record without having to wait
for a return call. This usually saves you time and decreases incident resolution
time.
See 8.4, “Submitting incidents electronically” on page 158 for the IBM support
URLs.
8.4.2 Service request tool
The Service Request tool is an online problem management tool for opening,
editing, and tracking your open and closed problem management records. Your
customer number is used for identification, and the tool can be used for all of your
IBM software. The time-saving options incorporated into this tool are:
Create a new problem management record with prepopulated demographic
fields
Describe a problem and select a severity level
Submit a problem management record directly to the correct support queue
Attach troubleshooting files directly to a problem management record
Receive alerts when a problem management record is updated by IBM
View reports on open and closed problem management records
Submitting Severity 1 incident outside of your country’s normal
business hours: To submit a Severity 1 incident, when it is outside of normal
business hours in your country, we highly recommend that you contact IBM by
voice or the web, indicating the severity of the incident and obtaining a
problem management record number. Based on your support contract
agreement, the appropriate action will be taken to address the incident.

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See 8.4, “Submitting incidents electronically” on page 158 for the IBM support
URLs.
8.5 Submitting incidents by telephone
IBM voice support is available for most software products and to all current
support contract holders through a Single Point of Contact telephone number in
your country (where available). When you call, provide your IBM Customer
Number and the related product name and version.
For our directory of worldwide contacts, visit:
http://www.ibm.com/planetwide/region.html
With the initial incident is described, a problem management record (PMR) is
created for you.
Make note of the problem management record number for future reference.
Your problem management record is then routed to the proper resolution team.
You might be transferred directly to the resolution team, or your issue might be
placed in the queue for call back. In both cases, the next person you speak with
will be a specialist from the resolution team.
At the resolution team level, your call is then researched, resolved, and
escalated, as necessary. Due to the level of specialization that is required to
maintain superior technical expertise at the team level, it is occasionally
necessary to involve more than one support team in resolving a particular
software incident. This is easily handled, as our support teams work as one to
resolve incidents.
To investigate your issue, IBM support services might need to access information
about your system to evaluate the incident or to recreate the incident to obtain
needed information. If the incident is related to configuration, you might need to
recreate the incident to obtain the required information. Our software support
specialists might request that you send in the resulting information (for example,
a test case) or that they connect to your network to view and discuss this with
you. To accomplish this, you might be offered several options by the IBM support
specialist. We might also recommend reviewing the incident information (or test
Problem management record: The problem management record number
might be referred to as a PMR number, an Incident number, or a Support Case
number. In this documentation, we refer to these, collectively, as PMR
numbers.

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case) online by setting up a remote session. This capability can be tailored to the
capabilities of your country and your platform.
For telephone support for individual countries, visit the Technical Support section
of the IBM Directory of worldwide contacts at:
http://www.ibm.com/planetwide/
8.6 Code defects
During the investigation process, the Resolution Team might determine that an
incident falls into one of the following categories and will address it in the manner
noted:
The incident is a known defect-related issue: A fix is provided if available. If no
fix is available, the Resolution Team will work with you to find the best feasible
workaround.
The incident is a new defect: The IBM Resolution Team will work with you to
create an Authorized Program Analysis Report or a Software Problem Report
to track the resolution of the defect. These Authorized Program Analysis
Reports and Software Problem Reports are routed to the appropriate
development teams.
The incident is not defect-related: If the Resolution Team determines that the
issue is not related to a defect in the supported IBM code, we will continue to
bring the incident to resolution only at your request and with your
concurrence, under a separate services agreement. For details, contact your
IBM Representative.
8.7 Non-critical support questions
Support services for “how-to” questions are available for non-critical issues, such
as:
Installation
Usage (how-to)
Specific use/installation questions for documented functions
Product compatibility and interoperability questions
Technical references to publications, such as Redbooks or manuals
Assistance with interpretation of publications
Providing available configuration samples
Planning information for software fixes
IBM database searches

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This level of support is available using the same contact number for your country
as listed in 8.5, “Submitting incidents by telephone ” on page 160.
8.8 Checking the status of a problem management
record
Check the status of problem management records using the service request tool.
The Owner field in the problem management record indicates the name of the
technical support engineer assigned to your record. Access to the service
request tool is located at:
http://www-306.ibm.com/software/support/probsub.html
8.9 Escalating an incident
If your problem management record is not progressing as quickly as expected,
contact Support Services and ask that a request for a call back be added to your
problem management record to review the incident severity level. If it is after
hours, ask that the incident be escalated so that it receives prompt attention and
management focus.
8.10 Incidents not covered by the IBM Software Support
Center
The IBM Software Support Center and S&S services do not address the
following incident types because they are beyond the scope of these services:
Performance analysis
Writing, troubleshooting, or customizing client code
Extensive configuration questions
Recovering a database, or data recovery
Consulting
Most of these situations require some form of assistance from our Services area.
For further information about these, see Appendix C, “Services offerings” on
page 203 or contact your IBM software sales representative.
An Accelerated Value Program offering is available that provides a more
proactive program for support and software deployment.

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8.11 Client responsibilities
To resolve your incident, our software support specialists might need to obtain
information about your incident for analysis, which includes relevant logs, storage
dumps, or traces. Gathering this information is often a crucial step toward a
resolution. We ask that you capture documentation at the time of a failure. Our
support specialists might also ask that you apply a trap or trace code to your
system. You are also responsible for obtaining fixes (available as a download or
shipped media), applying the fixes to your systems, and testing the fixes to
ensure they meet your needs. Occasionally, removal of installed fixes can be
necessary in the process of incident isolation. Occasionally, fixing an incident
requires the installation of a later release of software, as certain fixes cannot be
retrofitted to earlier code.
To carry out these tasks, the IBM Client Team might offer the assistance of our
Lab Services team, or you can engage a services provider such as IBM Software
Services or an external services organization to assist you for an additional fee. If
you are involved in a services engagement in which Software Services or an
external services organization is designing and implementing an application for
you, the statement of work needs to be clear as to whose responsibility it is to
work through suspected code defect issues with IBM Support to ensure proper
entitlement for remote support.

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© Copyright IBM Corp. 2011. All rights reserved.
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Chapter 9.
Software deployment
success stories from our
clients
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9.1 What this chapter is about
This chapter describes a case study from one of our clients. In this case study,
you learn about the best practices employed to plan, implement, and support the
enterprise-wide deployment of an enhanced messaging and collaboration
software platform. This initiative was recently undertaken by a global financial
services firm in partnership with IBM. The key concepts for the initiative include:
The importance of identifying specific business objectives related to a
deployment, where significant value can be measured in business terms
How the IBM Software Services group can be used to meet deployment goals
The benefits of establishing global software configuration standards
Server platform selection and how it can affect deployment architecture
Considerations for heritage platform co-existence and data migration
Real world deployment challenges and how they can be addressed
Why a comprehensive education and communications plan is critical for
success
Software deployment package design and quality control testing
Accelerated product enhancements using user feedback and collaborative
design
Why a comprehensive approach to performance tuning is required and
beneficial
The need to develop and document best practices for systems administration
9.2 Client background
In 2007, two large financial services organizations engaged in a “merger of
equals” so that they can use their strengths in various complimentary lines of
business and provide a more complete portfolio of offering across a global
market. The lines of business included wealth management, asset management,
securities servicing, and treasury services. At the time the merger was initiated,
one firm employed approximately 27,000 people, and the other, approximately
15,000. The merger was a multi-year effort and involved consolidation of human
resources, business processes, and office locations.
When completed, the merger had a substantial positive impact on the new
enterprise and its position in the financial services industry. Many challenges and

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opportunities were presented to the firm’s newly merged technology services
organizations.
IBM worked as a trusted partner and engaged in planning, project management,
implementation, and support for a variety of key IT initiatives. This deployment
case study focuses on one of the client’s most critical projects: the
implementation of a single email and collaborative application infrastructure. The
platform that was needed to support the integration of the two firms during the
merger process provides the ability to more effectively conduct business and use
the intellectual capital and experience of worldwide subject matter experts
(SMEs) on an ongoing basis.
The CIO, one of the key stakeholders for the project, wanted to go beyond email.
His vision was of a unified communications and collaboration platform that:
Used new and existing Notes applications
Supported integration with other IBM and third party applications
Enabled real time collaboration using instant messaging and web
conferencing
Supported future integration with Voice over IP (VoIP) and videoconferencing
technologies
Provided “collaboration in context” of the user’s role and work tasks
In addition, the CIO saw the value of social networking tools, such as rich user
profiles containing more than just contact information, and communities of
practice, blogs, wikis, simple file sharing, and tagging and rating content.
The implementation of a new email platform needed to be accomplished with a
minimum of disruption and downtime because several key business units relied
on email for communication of critical transactions.
9.3 Solution
A deployment best practice is to develop an overall solution design and
architecture that addresses current needs of the business, while providing the
means to support anticipated future requirements.
The joint IT organization conducted an extended evaluation of both email
platforms and ultimately selected Lotus Notes® and Domino®. They also
decided to upgrade the existing environment to Notes and Domino 8, which was
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IBM Lotus SameTime was already in limited use for instant messaging and web
conferencing. It was decided to expand the deployment of SameTime for instant
messaging by utilizing the capability embedded in the Notes 8 client. A benefit of
this approach was that it enabled real time collaboration in the context of work
being performed in the Notes client. The initial deployment (and subsequent
upgrades) of SameTime can also be packaged with Notes.
After a parallel evaluation and proof of concept effort, it was also decided to
implement Lotus Connections to support business-ready social networking, for
which the initial deployment focused on employee profiles and communities of
practice. A unique aspect of Notes was the ability to add Eclipse-based widgets
and plug-ins to the Notes Sidebar, which supported the integration of
Connections functionality into Notes.
Key factors in the client’s decision included the integration of SameTime and
Connections into the Notes 8 client, and the ability to use thousands of existing
Notes business applications. These collaborative applications might not easily be
converted to another platform.
The long term strategy included the integrating unified communications into the
Notes client, such as VoIP and desktop videoconferencing.
9.4 Deployment strategy
In this section, we describe the strategy that was implemented and devised.
9.4.1 Implementing global configuration standards
A key success factor for a large upgrade and platform migration initiative was the
imposition of global standards for both server and client configurations.
Previously, the client had numerous configurations which were not well
documented. This complicated the upgrades and support of the server and client
environments.
IBM worked with the client’s project team to develop a limited number of
configuration templates for Domino servers (Directory, hub, mail, and application
servers) and Notes clients.
Additional considerations included support for desktop users, mobile computer
users, and roaming users who occasionally moved between offices and PCs.
There were also language and regionalization considerations that were
necessary to support global operations at numerous branch locations.

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9.4.2 Domino on System p and AIX
The client decided to implement Domino 8 on IBM System p servers running AIX.
This facilitated large scale server consolidation, with the goal of reduced
hardware and administration costs, higher reliability, and greater scalability than
Windows servers. A factor that also influenced this decision was that the client
was already using System p servers for other applications, and had personnel
skilled in the operating system-level administration of these servers. Domino
servers were implemented in Domino partitions on the System p servers, and
then clustered for failover purposes. A multi-data center configuration was also
employed for disaster recovery purposes.
Mail server co-existence during migration
Mature Exchange mail servers operated alongside the Domino environment,
supporting users that had not yet been migrated and Exchange public folders
and applications that get migrated in the future.
A gateway solution was implemented to support cross-platform mail routing,
calendaring and scheduling, and address lookups during the migration period.
IBM Services to support planning, pilot, and production deployment
The client’s management team recognized the importance of partnering with the
IBM Software Services group to help ensure a successful outcome for this effort.
At a high level, the primary benefits of this strategic partnership were:
The ability to use the knowledge of IBM architects who had successfully
implemented large Notes and Domino 8.x environments for other clients
The benefits of IBM software deployment methodology and best practices
The ability to use the experience of IBM project managers to help ensure
critical milestones were reached on schedule
IBM technical staff supplementation to accelerate implementation and
configuration of Domino servers and deployment of Notes client software
The IBM services organization recommended or provided, proven third party
applications to support interoperability and data migration
IBM consultants provided best practices advice on help desk support
programs, user education plans, and corporate information campaign
development
Multiple teams within IBM were engaged early in the project to help ensure a
successful deployment. IBM provided support throughout all phases of the
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The technical sales organization initially worked with the client to provide:
Business and technical requirements analysis
Solution visioning
Integrated product capability demonstrations
Technical documentation for planning purposes
Deployment best practices reference materials
Product strategy and roadmap information
Engagement with the IBM services organization
The IBM Software Services solution architects and advanced technology
services IT specialists then provided assistance with:
– High level planning of Notes and Domino 8 upgrades and migration
– Domino architecture design considerations
– Server platform and operating system selection
– Initial server sizing recommendations
These planning activities were crucial because they laid the groundwork that
helped to ensure the success of the deployment and provided a solid platform for
growth.
The client then engaged IBM Software Services to provide consultative services
including implementation of a Notes and Domino 8 lab environment:
Co-development of a server and client upgrade and migration plan
Migration and co-existence tools selection and configuration
Notes Client deployment planning and installation package design
Design of Domino server configuration templates
Assistance with initial server and client deployments
Expanded IBM involvement in deployment
It was originally envisioned that the client provide overall project management
followed by ongoing production Domino server deployments and Notes 8 client
upgrades and migrations, including data migration. As the project progressed, a
strategy change was required. It was determined that, to meet milestone dates,
additional IBM assistance was required. IBM provided dedicated project
management resources and technical resources for implementation. A jointly
staffed, dedicated workgroup was established to focus on Notes 8 client
deployment, and the results were positive.
Notes deployment package Quality Assurance testing with IBM
One of the client’s priorities was to deploy the latest versions of Notes with a
minimum of disruption to the business. To ensure that upgrades went smoothly
from a technical and usability perspective, the team instituted a quality assurance
testing initiative.

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The Notes quality assurance (QA) testing process included these focus areas:
New Notes functionality
New Notes code fixes
Performance and stability testing
Determine if code “regression issues” were introduced using hot fixes or fix
packs
Mail template customizations
Notes 8.x plug-in functionality, including user authentication
QA testing was also performed on the installation scripts that were used to
deploy the Notes client and Notes upgrades to users’ desktops using electronic
software distribution tools. The development of scripts needed to take into
account several variables with respect to workstation hardware and software
configuration, such as geography and language, operating system version,
system memory, free disk space, existing versions of Notes to be upgraded, and
whether a local mail replica existed.
An additional consideration was that many Notes users were using custom
developed roaming user functionality. This functionality copied Notes desktop
configuration data from the user’s workstation to a file server at the close of each
work session. This process made it possible for a traveling user to access their
personalized Notes client configuration from another workstation. The Notes
upgrade installer needed to work in this environment, which required additional
QA testing.
The deployment tool needed to provide programmatic feedback to the
deployment team on various error conditions, for example, why an installation
cannot be completed. These different failure scenarios needed to be tested.
Another consideration was the network bandwidth utilization when pushing new
or updated Notes client code down to desktops for installation. From a quality
assurance perspective, performance benchmarking needed to be performed to
determine how long an installation or upgrade would take, and whether network
performance would be impacted.
A QA test lab environment was set up to facilitate the testing process.
Workstations with a variety of configurations were configured in a test network
environment. Detailed test scripts were developed so that QA testers can follow a
consistent process.
At a high level, our best practices recommendations included:
A QA test process that would encompass features, fixes, performance, and
stability

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Sufficient time for testing, evaluation of results, and issue remediation
A dedicated test environment that would accurately model production client
configurations (and servers and networks)
A test script for technical resources to follow
The availability of sufficient technical personnel to perform QA testing and
remediation in the time frame required
Test the software deployment methodology, in addition to the code
9.5 Technical challenges
Several of the technical challenges, from an infrastructure perspective, included
multiple mail and PIM platforms (IBM Lotus Notes and Microsoft Exchange):
The Notes environment was not current, as the latest user interface design,
features, and platform capabilities were not available to administrators,
application developers, or end-users
Multiple directories, including Domino Directory and Active Directory
Multiple email archiving platforms
Multiple server hardware platforms and operating systems
Lack of standardization of mail and application server versions and
configurations
Large and small office locations across the United States, in Europe, and in
Asia, connected by a network infrastructure of varying bandwidth and
capacity
Multiple heritage data centers, with planned new data center construction,
and associated server consolidations and relocations)
Deployment challenges related to the upgrade of existing Notes users to Notes 8
and the migration of Outlook users to Notes, included infrastructure and
server-side challenges:
Directory consolidation and data normalization
Develop directory hierarchy for the consolidated enterprise
Select the optimum server hardware and operating system platform
Develop the optimum server infrastructure, including provisions for disaster
recovery
Create a limited number of server configuration templates

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Define a process to migrate Exchange mail, PIM data, and public folders to
Notes
Convert Notes mail and PIM data to the latest version format
Optimize mail routing for temporary co-existence of old and new mail
platforms
Upgrade existing Notes application servers and ensure compatibility
Migrate or re-write existing MS Exchange-based applications
Validate compatibility or implement compatible versions of third party
applications for archiving, anti-virus, and mobile device support (for example,
Blackberry)
Make tools available to monitor server performance and availability and
reporting capabilities
Client-side challenges:
Select a specific build and configuration of Notes 8 client to be deployed
Determine Notes feature set for deployment, including plug-ins
Develop client upgrade packaging and deployment scripts
Develop client migration process (Outlook to Notes)
9.6 Organizational challenges
Challenges from an organizational perspective included the need to:
Provide strong project management to meet milestones and limit risks
Obtain a sufficient quantity and types of skilled technical resources to
accomplish goals
Develop a corporate communications plan to keep users informed about the
upgrade and migration timetable and potential impact to the business
Develop tactics to foster user acceptance and adoption of new applications
Develop an education plan to provide effective enablement to 42,000 users
Develop more effective operational procedures for server administration
Train multiple levels of support personnel on new products
Train developers to effectively use the Notes Domino 8 platform
Determine how to survey users to gauge their level of acceptance and identify
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Provide support to subsidiary companies with independent IT organizations
Effectively interface with IBM to obtain technical support and provide
feedback on feature requirements
9.7 Deliverables and outcomes
In this section, we discuss the deliverables and outcomes of this implementation.
9.7.1 Notes and Domino enhancement process

Because Notes 8 was deployed to an increasing numbers of users, many feature
enhancement and fix requests were generated from the global user community.
Additional issues were uncovered by the client’s project team during deployment
planning and testing. The Notes development team partnered with the client’s IT
organization, and worked closely with them on an ongoing basis to improve
Notes functionality, usability, stability, and performance. Notes mail template
customizations and other enhancements were also developed and implemented
to meet specific user requirements.
While these activities were not anticipated at project inception, they were found
to ultimately be beneficial and a requirement for success because they increased
the overall user acceptance of Notes and Domino, and they increased
organizational productivity.
Notes feature enhancements and fixes were developed, based on the following
process:
Historical data from end user support calls was analyzed by the client and the
IBM client team to categorize and quantify the different problems
experienced. Several requests and issues were determined to be product
related, and others were process related (such as password resets or email
addressing questions) The most frequently experienced problems were
prioritized for follow-up and action. This included the enhancement of
administrative and support processes, and providing additional enablement
for end-users.
User interviews were conducted by joint client and IBM client teams, in
multiple locations and at different times, to obtain feedback on usability,
functionality, and performance. Detailed notes showed patterns in user
requests, and, in many cases, highlighted the need for additional enablement.
User personas were also developed to detail the specific and unique ways
that Notes was being used by specific line-of-business users. This facilitated
the development of customized Notes configuration profiles that were tailored

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to each use case. Additional feedback was obtained from end-users at
enablement and Q&A sessions, and internal IT Expo events.
All feature and fix requests were prioritized by the client’s IT management to
determine the highest priority and highest value items. The top ranked items
were then provided to IBM for action. The Notes development team delivered
many enhancements and fixes using “point releases”, fix packs, and hot fixes
based on this direct client feedback. Periodic joint status meetings were
conducted to review a detailed action item list and plan for future fixes and
enhancements.
This process continued throughout the Notes 8.0.x client deployment, and then
for the subsequent deployment of Notes 8.5.1, which began in Q4 2010.
9.7.2 End-to-End Performance Optimization: Consultative Study by
IBM
At the client’s request, IBM conducted a comprehensive performance review.
Both Domino server and Notes client configuration templates were analyzed,
from a performance perspective, and configuration changes were recommended.
IBM also provided high level recommendations for network performance
optimization.
These efforts included real time observations of Notes client performance for
different parameters, including: Notes start-up time, delay in opening new
application windows, time to creating new mail messages and calendar
invitations, and time to create mail folders and move a message to a folder. In
order to perform a balanced assessment of Notes performance, data was
collected at several office locations in the United States and in Europe.
The client globally implemented Notes 8 using an online mail template that ran
on the Domino server. This significantly impacted Notes client performance,
especially in office locations where network bandwidth was constrained.
The client’s mobile workers were already using local mail replicas, so they can
continue to work with Notes when disconnected from the network. IBM
recommended a broader implementation of Notes mail file replicas on user
workstations to improve performance.
In Proof of Concept (PoC) testing, “Local Notes” significantly improved the user
experience. The deployment of mail file replicas on workstations also enabled
users to continue to be productive in the event of network outages. A
consideration was that Notes location documents, especially data replication
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9.7.3 Mail routing changes to support more accurate mail routing
IBM assisted the client with the optimization of their Domino mail routing design
to improve the accuracy of mail delivery. The client historically used a Domino
mail routing feature called “short name routing” to enable mail to be delivered
based on only a partial match of the email address to Domino directory entries. A
problem was observed, which was due to the use of a large number of Internet
mail domains to support multiple lines of business for client communications.
Several times, users provided only a partial email address. This would result in
multiple name matches across different mail domains in the environment, where
the first part of the email address was the same.
IBM recommended that the client implement full name routing. This process
required an exact match to route Internet mail within the enterprise. The result of
this configuration change was more accurate delivery of mail throughout the
enterprise.
There were two important planning considerations prior to making this change.
First, many Notes applications were written that allowed short name addressing
of mail. These applications needed to be modified and tested prior to the routing
configuration changes. In addition, a user education program needed to be
instituted, to ensure that everyone understood that complete email addresses
would be required for mail delivery.
9.7.4 Notes 8.5.1 design review, deployment planning, and product
roadmap sessions
IBM conducted multiple design review and deployment planning sessions with
the client’s IT organization. These sessions were attended by IBM SMEs who
discussed best practices and use cases derived from other major Notes and
Domino deployments.
In conjunction with the design review and planning sessions, IBM client
architects, user interface designers, and development managers obtained direct
feedback from the client’s executives, IT organization, and end users, about
feature enhancements. Product roadmap information was shared with the client,
to enable them to make better long-range planning decisions.
9.7.5 Notes quality assurance testing
The client was challenged to meet their deployment timeline for Notes upgrades,
given the technical staff available for quality assurance testing. They used the
IBM Software Services technical staff augmentation services to speed QA

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testing of Notes 8.5.1 software deployment automation scripts, deployment code
packages and multiple, standardized Notes client configurations.
Test workstations were set up by the joint IBM and client technical team in a
dedicated test environment, and several test cycles were performed.
This facilitated a rapid and iterative design process for Notes deployment scripts,
where observed problems were corrected, and re-tested by the on site testing
team.
IBM also provided project management and Notes development team resources
for planning an evaluation of QA testing results. This, too, helped to ensure a
successful outcome.
9.7.6 Administration best practices and knowledge sharing with the
IBM Domino administration team
The client met with members of the IBM global Domino administration team, to
share best practices for Domino deployment, high availability architectures,
performance and availability monitoring, and automation for server
administration. There was additional collaboration with the IBM client team
responsible for Notes client standard configurations, packaging, and
deployments.
In an additional engagement, an IBM SME provided an in-depth, consultative
review of the client’s existing Domino administration practices, with detailed
recommendations for process enhancement.
These activities had a major impact on the clients’ Notes and Domino 8.x and
8.5.x environments, making them more effective and operative.
9.7.7 Application server upgrade and application compatibility review
of Notes 8.5.1
IBM participated in the application review process to provide technical
documentation of potential impacts of upgrading Domino application servers
from Domino 6.5 or 8.0.2 to Domino 8.5.1. IBM SMEs also provided
recommendations on the application testing process and the various tools that
can be employed to facilitate this. The testing process was completed by the
Notes application development teams in the various lines of business. The
results of the testing revealed that there was minimal impact to existing
applications by upgrading to Domino 8.5.1. IBM also provided remote technical
support personnel who were available during the server upgrade process to
respond to any issues encountered.

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The best practices lesson here is that time must be included in a project plan for
comprehensive application testing and potential remediation whenever a project
involves upgrades to Domino application servers and also to Notes clients. A
methodology must be developed for testing. If there are a large number of
applications to be tested, the sample must be representative of each type of
application. Clear responsibility for the testing process must be assigned to
developer and QA resources. In addition, results must be methodically
documented, and regular status check meetings need to be conducted, until the
test phase is completed. These activities will help ensure that there will be no
unanticipated problems with business critical applications after the roll-out of the
server (and client) upgrades.
9.7.8 Notes Support Best Practices Review
IBM provided a SME to work with the client’s support organization. A joint review
was conducted, which included the methods and tools to provide both site help
desk support (and on-site technical support) to Notes users. Enhanced workflow
processes were recommended by IBM. Customization and content updates,
reflecting new Notes 8.5.1 features, were implemented for both technical support
and end user self-help online databases. IBM assisted the client with this effort.
An analysis was also performed of historical data for a large number of support
incidents across the enterprise. Classification of types of support issues, and
patterns in responses and outcomes, were derived from this data. It was
observed that a significant number of complaints were related to administrative
functions, such as the time it took to complete password resets or recover
forgotten passwords. IBM made recommendations on how to streamline these
processes.
The key lessons learned included:
Help desk staffing, training, and applications, such as call logging and
technical support knowledge bases, must support the volume of anticipated
calls which result from an enterprise application upgrade or migration. Delays
in response time will adversely affect user satisfaction with newly deployed
products.
It is advantageous to capture detailed metrics on support calls, especially by
categorizing the different types of issues, so that trends can be observed.
These trends can point to the need for additional user training, changes to
operational procedures, or requirements for product functionality or usability
enhancements.
Periodic reviews are necessary to track the progress of initiatives, as this can
reduce the volume of help desk tickets and improve response time and time to
resolution. For example, a reduction in the number of help desk tickets related

Chapter 9. Software deployment success stories from our clients
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to a specific end-user application feature can substantiate the benefits of a
user interface design enhancement, the implementation of a bug fix or
providing additional training to users. Help desk ticket statistics can be
employed to complement the information provided by user satisfaction
surveys and user interviews.
9.7.9 Education plans and the joint work with IBM
The design and implementation of an effective education plan is critical to the
success of a large scale software deployment, especially one that includes
end-user messaging and collaboration applications. User productivity is greatly
enhanced and their satisfaction increased if they are educated about the new
features and capabilities of a product, rather than being left to discover these on
their own. It is also important to provide users with the knowledge they need to
feel comfortable moving from one application to another, such as Outlook to
Notes, or from one version to another, such as Notes 6 to Notes 8.5.
Education plans can incorporate a variety of learning methods, such as
instructor-led classroom and web-based training and self-study and reference
materials for those who have limited time or prefer independent learning.
Education plans must also take into account the volume of users to be trained,
and the geographic distribution of users at different branch office locations. This
factor has a major impact on the logistics and cost for on-site training. The
availability of training facilities at each location is also a factor. Another
consideration is that off-the-shelf course material or reference information might
need to be customized to match the specific implementation of the product in the
client environment. For example, certain features of the Notes client might not
have been implemented, or the mail template might have been customized to
meet business requirements.
For this project, education was provided through a combination of on-site
enablement sessions led by IBM, web-based training, instructor-led training,
weekly telephone Q&A sessions, and self-help materials, such as the Notes
Multimedia Library, which were made available to users on the company intranet.
An additional area of focus was the training of the client’s help desk personnel to
enable them to identify and resolve problems more quickly. IBM provided
customized enablement to help support personnel and address the most
frequently observed user issues. An IBM education partner also provided training
classes for help desk personnel.
The client had several subsidiaries whose IT organizations worked in a
semi-autonomous fashion with respect to technology implementation, upgrades,
and end-user support. IBM worked with the client to better understand the

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technical challenges and competencies of these groups and to provide
enablement and additional technical support as required.
9.7.10 Corporate Communications Plan—Joint Work with IBM
IBM project managers, product marketing managers, and graphic arts specialists
supported the client’s Corporate Communications Executive and IT organization
in developing and executing a communications plan to inform the user
community about the new features and business benefits of Notes 8, SameTime,
and Connections.
When Notes 8.5.1 upgrades took place, additional support was provided to
provide end-users with information about the benefits of this enhanced client.
An effective communications plan was a critical component for success. Outlook
users needed to be informed about the schedule for the migration to Notes and
the impact on their business. They also needed to be educated about the
features of Notes, and how to obtain additional support. Users of older versions
of Notes also needed information and enablement on the enhanced capabilities
of Notes 8.5.1. The communications plan also helped employees who
experienced performance and usability issues to understand what the joint IBM
and client IT project team was doing to address these issues. The
communications campaign demonstrated to these users that their feedback was
being heard and acted upon. This produced tangible results.
9.7.11 Lotus Connections integration with Notes and the IBM widget
design assistance
The client developed and integrated custom Notes widgets into the Notes 8.5.1
client template. These widgets provided integration with Lotus Connections
Profiles, communities and file sharing features, enabling Notes users to be more
productive. The client also integrated the SameTime business card pop-up
feature with Connections Profiles, to provide richer, more actionable information
to users.
IBM provided developer resources to help the client implement these features in
the context of their enterprise directory and single sign-on security environments.
From the perspective of deployment best practices, this example highlights the
need to carefully plan for and test multi-product or multi-component integrations
when using single-sign on in an enterprise, given that each product or
component might support different single sign-on techniques. It was also
beneficial to the client to partner with the IBM product development team
because they were able to not only get support for required customizations to

Chapter 9. Software deployment success stories from our clients
181
support their single sign-on requirements but also product roadmap information
that helped to guide their implementation methodology.
9.8 IBM deployment best practices as applied to this
project
This case study documents the software solution architecture and global
enterprise deployment activities of an IBM client. In this section, we map these
activities to the best practices for deployment, which we discussed in Chapter 3,
“Accelerating software deployment using best practices” on page 47.
9.8.1 Identifying the Executive Business Sponsor and stakeholders
This project impacted a core collaborative application (email and personal
information management) that was critical to productivity across all lines of
business. In addition, it involved a substantial financial investment and a
commitment of technical resources.
The IBM client team had a previously established, "trusted partner" relationship
with the global CIO. Strong business benefits associated with the project were
identified, and the strategy and goals were communicated to multiple levels of
management, including CTOs and CIOs of the key lines of business and
Directors and Managers in the technical organization.
Buy-in from key stakeholders, both business and technical, was necessary to
ensure a successful outcome. IBM conducted a series of executive level
presentations and demonstrations that were tailored to address key business
benefits of relevance to the firm.
For this project, stakeholders also included power users of Notes and Domino,
such as administrative assistants who support managers and executives. These
application users provided valuable feedback to the joint deployment team,
related usability and performance, and desired feature enhancements and
training requirements.
Stakeholders also included the client's server administrators, application
development community, and on-site and telephone support personnel.

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9.8.2 Defining a governance structure for the deployment process
The client has a well-defined IT governance structure for each phase of the
project, including:
The initial review process leading to the decision to deploy Notes and
Domino 8
Their subsequent decision to upgrade to the Notes and Domino 8.5 code
stream
Decisions related to Domino server architecture and configuration
Decisions related to changes to the global mail routing architecture
Contents and approval of the custom Notes client package and deployment
scripts
Decisions impacting the order of Notes 8.x deployment / upgrades to LOBs
Decisions related to education for technical personnel and end users
Decisions related to an corporate information campaign to promote user
adoption
Prioritization of software feature and fix requests to address enterprise
priorities
Technical support issue escalation, both internally and to IBM Support
Because the client's operations are global in scope, the governance process was
also tied to geographical impact of a particular decision. Another governance
parameter was whether the decision affected a single line of business, multiple
lines of business, or the entire enterprise.
An example of the governance structure employed by the client is:
The technical team, in multiple working sessions, discussed Notes configurations
and deployment scripts. These meetings were moderated by a project
manager/team leader. Subject matter experts from the client's technology
services organization and IBM consulting and product development teams
collaborated on solution design. A consensus was usually achieved on the best
technical configuration to employ. However, in some cases, the decision was
made unilaterally by the project manager.
The team's decision was then reviewed and approved by a Technical Director
(2nd line management). The project manager kept the implementation on track,
and monitored and reported on status to senior management. High-level solution
design and timetable and completion status were reported by the Technical
Director (and IBM) to the global CIO and subordinate CIOs for impacted lines of
business on a periodic basis.

Chapter 9. Software deployment success stories from our clients
183
9.8.3 Centralizing software fulfillment and license management tools
This client has a corporate procurement and asset management department.
Procurement negotiates the contents, pricing, and terms of the Enterprise
License Agreement with IBM. Asset Management tracked deployment of
software both by the enterprise level Technology Services Group and the
technology organization’s individual lines of business.
Tracking is currently facilitated using the IBM Enterprise Software Management
Tool. IBM provides this application to clients. Deployment data provided by users
is entered by Asset Management, and deployment reports are generated for both
the client’s and IBM review.
Software supporting this project was downloaded from the IBM Passport
Advantage online web site by the Technology Services organization and then
distributed to target servers for installation at several data centers in the United
States, Europe, and Asia Pacific region. Additional tracking reports are available
through Passport Advantage, including download reports that can be sorted and
filtered by primary contact, person downloading, Passport Advantage site, part
number, and date.
A current challenge that the client and IBM face is that there are many active
Passport Advantage sites and authorized users who can download software.
This complicates both the tracking and internal charge-back accounting
processes. Sometimes, software that is downloaded might not be reported to
Asset Management on a timely basis.
IBM encourages a more centralized approach, where requests for IBM software
downloads in support of deployments are channeled through a review and
approval workflow process that is administered by corporate Procurement, and
then a limited number (or single) of Passport Advantage sites are used for
download and software distribution to lines of business. In some cases, an IBM
distribution partner is employed to control the download process, and the partner
also provides enhanced deployment reports to the client.
9.8.4 Engaging consulting and implementation services
The client engaged IBM software consulting and implementation services early
in the life cycle of this project.
Prior to the decision to proceed with the Notes Domino 8 upgrade/migration, an
IBM Software Services Solution Architect lead solution visioning and architecture
design sessions with the client's technical team.

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Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
The client then formally engaged IBM Software Services to help them design a
Domino 8 server infrastructure and standard server configuration templates,
supporting both mail and applications. Software services also worked with the
client to develop a Notes upgrade/migration methodology, including selecting and
implementing migration tools. The IBM on-site services team also assisted the
client in building a Domino 8 lab environment, a Domino pilot environment, and
an initial pilot deployment of Notes 8 to users. The services team also developed
and delivered end-user and administrator enablement sessions and supporting
documentation and user self-help materials.
When the client's technical team began to build production Domino servers,
started upgrading large numbers of users from Notes 6.5 to Notes 8, and
migrating Outlook users to Notes, they found that they needed additional
technical resources to keep on track with the project timeline. IBM Software
Services project managers were engaged to partner with the client's project
manager, and IBM provided additional on-site resources to assist with
implementation of client deployments and data migration. With IBM assistance,
the production deployment of Notes and Domino 8 was completed successfully.
Later on, the client engaged the IBM services team to:
Contribute to Notes Domino 8.5.1 upgrade planning sessions
Conduct health checks to optimize the performance and stability of their
production Domino environment
Certify the redesign of SMTP mail routing
Provide Notes 8.5.1 deployment package quality assurance testing
Provide assistance with Domino administration and support best practices
Overall, the assistance provided by the IBM services organization proved to be a
crucial element to the successful completion of each project milestone.
9.8.5 Defining your return on investment strategy and time to value
The client's Global CIO and direct reports in technology management formulated
a return on investment (ROI) strategy that was based on these key factors:
Consolidation of existing mail and application servers running on the
Windows platform to more scalable and reliable IBM pSeries® servers
running AIX. The benefit of this was expected to be reduced operational costs
associated with server hardware and systems administration.
Synergy and productivity gains to be realized by employing one client
supporting traditional email and personal information management, business
applications and additional tools including Sametime®, Lotus Connections
and Quickr™.

Chapter 9. Software deployment success stories from our clients
185
Ability to take advantage of previously developed Notes applications across
the enterprise.
Rapid application development and reduced time to value for new
applications.
Potential integration with Unified Communications (voice over IP and
videoconferencing) applications that were integrated with Notes 8.
9.8.6 Conducting workshops to assure deployment readiness
IBM assisted the client by providing resources from the Software Services,
Development, Product Management, and Technical Sales organizations to lead
and participate in multiple readiness planning and technical design sessions for
both the initial Notes and Domino 8 deployment and the 8.5.1 upgrade.
Workshops were conducted by IBM for many of the client's Domino developers,
to familiarize them with the new features and development tools available in the
latest product releases.
Additional workshops were provided by IBM, which focused on Notes
troubleshooting techniques, Domino administration, and Notes support best
practices.
9.8.7 Identifying strong project and resource management
The client identified and assigned technical project managers to focus on the
Domino server and Notes deployment components of the project. They
partnered with project managers from the IBM services organization for some
phases of the overall project.
9.8.8 Committing to self-sufficiency
The client's executive management committed to building appropriate skill sets of
their existing technical organization and to adding additional resources
necessary to properly administrate and support the environment and the user
community. This proved to be a challenging goal due to the following factors:
Resources were needed to support global deployment with servers
positioned in three different regions of the world and at multiple sites in each
region
Lack of standardized configurations complicated administration and support
Implementation of server hardware and operating system platform which
existing Domino administrators were not familiar with

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Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
Need to educate a large number of existing Notes users on the new features
of Notes 8, and a large number of Outlook users who had migrated to Notes
IBM and IBM education partners provided formal and informal enablement to
server administrators, developers and support personnel.
In addition, IBM shared Domino administration and Notes deployment best
practices information (including best practices derived from IBM experience
building, deploying, and managing its global Notes and Domino environment).
IBM and the client's technical organization also provided on site and remote
Notes 8 enablement to end-users.
All of these activities helped the client to become more self-sufficient.
9.8.9 Communicating and marketing the vision
IBM partnered with the client's senior management team and Director of
Corporate Communications to help communicate and market the value of Notes
and Domino as more than email, and how it provides additional benefits and
enhances productivity.
A communications and user education campaign was planned and implemented.
IBM provided project management, content, and graphics design assistance for
development of a variety of electronic and printed collateral items for marketing to
the user community.
IBM also reviewed scripts for video briefings, which were delivered by IT
executives.
IBM partnered with the client's IT to present "What's New in Notes 8"
demonstrations and Q&A sessions at many client locations and participated in IT
Expo events to give users additional opportunities to become familiar with the
new tools that were provided to them.
Finally, IBM partnered with the client's technical organization in an outreach
program to get feedback from Notes users worldwide, which enabled the client to
prioritize feature enhancement and fix requests that were most important to
them. IBM then delivered product upgrades and fix packs that provided the
maximum value to the client. When these new features and customizations were
delivered to users, they realized that someone was really listening and acting on
their concerns.

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2011. All rights reserved.
187
Appendix A.
The IBM Enterprise License
Agreement
A

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Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
The IBM enterprise license agreement and how it
provides value to the client
An enterprise license agreement (ELA) is a contract vehicle for a longer term
agreement between the client and IBM. ELAs were originally created as a longer
term contract for IBM z/OS software only. Since that time, ELAs have expanded
to other software (also non- z/OS contracts). The following types of contracts are
available under the ELA umbrella:
Enterprise License Agreement
Enterprise Software and Services Offering
Software And Services Special Offerings
Software Relationship Agreement
Software Relationship Offerings
Table 9-1 provides an overview of the ELA types.
Table 9-1 Overview of ELA types
With an ELA, the client and IBM commit to a longer term partnership relationship
that provides benefits to both. IBM can provide much better guidance for the
optimal use of IBM software because they have a better understanding of the
client’s environment and goals. In this way, IBM can provide guidance about the
organization, skills, and processes that are needed to maintain and operate the
environment.
Potential ELA content
Most contracts under the ELA umbrella can include the following options:
Services included in a “package”
Value basket:
– Including services
– Excluding services
Including z/OS SW (MLC) Without z/OS SW (MLC)
Non-financed
Enterprise Software and
Services Offering
Enterprise Software and
Services Offering
Financed
Software Relationship
Offerings
Software Relationship
Agreement

Appendix A. The IBM Enterprise License Agreement
189
Substitution (usually within a brand)
Possible extension after a defined period and with the same conditions as the
original contract
Services
An implementation plan is usually included during the planning phase and
contains:
Identification of resources needed for implementation, including skills and
availabilities
Level of a technical support needed from IBM
Education needed for successful implementation and the operation of new
technology
These services might be provided by:
Client internal resources
IBM Business Partner resources
IBM resources
Estimates of service support needs can be included in an ELA.
Value basket
Value basket is an open budget-included contract that can be used for:
A new license purchase under the same terms and conditions as the other
licenses in the contract
Services under the same terms and conditions as the other services in the
contract
In certain cases, a Value Basket is restricted to new licenses only.
Substitution
In many cases, all of the details (for example, which product fits the best, how
many licenses are needed) cannot be defined for a multi-year project roadmap
during the planning stage. Therefore, substitution adds the flexibility to adjust the
software licenses to the client’s needs. It is usually limited to within one IBM
software brand but in certain cases can be open.

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Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
These contract features were developed based on several years of experience
with large accounts. Now, these features provide an excellent framework for
clients to achieve business goals at optimum cost.
Why and how an IBM ELA is significant from a software
deployment perspective
An IBM ELA is a multi-year contract, generally based on multiple projects, which
provides a new dimension in complexity as:
Project priorities can change during the contract period. Certain projects are
lower priority and will not be undertaken during contract period. Other projects
might not have the prerequisites ready in time, which can also have an impact
on the project schedule.
Projects scheduled to begin more than a year into the ELA usually do not
have a detailed design. Therefore, there can be several changes in the
predicted architecture.
Technology changes during the contract period can impact the architecture.
All of these challenges can have an extensive impact on software deployment
success and the business value from the contract, especially if these challenges
are not managed properly. Detailed ELA content planning and software
deployment management are crucial for success. Software deployment best
practices and deployment tools, along with ELA contract options (as described in
this book) can help to minimize risks.
Detailed ELA content planning can include:
Goals and objectives
Projects:
– Project description
– Project timeline (duration, start date, anticipated end date)
– Project dependencies
The technology and products needed to support planned projects and
achieve business goals:
– List of products and quantities, product selection description, and sizing
estimates
– List of functional components in the architecture for which the technology
has not been selected

Appendix A. The IBM Enterprise License Agreement
191
– The relationship between products, projects, and goals, and business
justification
Services needed for implementation and operation:
– Product implementation plan
– Support plan
– Education plan for implementers and operations team
Risk analyses
Risk and compliance
ELAs can involve a large quantity of software licenses to be deployed across the
enterprise, worldwide. Focusing on accurately tracking deployed licenses is
essential, especially for ELA. There is always a risk of over-deployment (for
example, deploying software on too many servers or deploying software not in
accordance with the terms and conditions in the contract). The first time this is
discovered might be during an audit, leading to an exposure to risk.
Processor Value Unit sub-capacity licensing lets you take advantage of the IBM
virtualization technologies. Sub-capacity licensing, in conjunction with the IBM
License Metric Tool, keeps you prepared for compliance audits with the
Processor Value Unit consumption reports generated by the License Metric Tool.
In most cases, over-deployment occurs because of insufficient administration in
tracking deployment. This is easily avoided by using the proper tools and
procedures. See “License and asset management tools” on page 74 for ideas
about license management tools.

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Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2011. All rights reserved.
193
Appendix B.
Managing complex software
deployment projects
B

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Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
What makes software deployment projects complex
Ideally every company, large or small, has standardized processes and products,
stable budgets, well-trained staff, and project management (delivery) disciplines
that help to realize the value of the software assets they invest in. Reality and
experience tell us that this is not the case.
In this chapter, we examine a number of issues that most often make the delivery
of software-intensive solutions more complex, and we provide suggestions on
how to remediate these issues. The first and most important part of remediation
is realizing that there are issues. With the issues acknowledged, they can be
added to project planning documentation at the outset of the project and
addressed during the course of the project.
It is important to recognize that more than one type of issue can interact in a
given software deployment scenario. Several of these are:
The global nature of the project
Multiple vendors participating in the project
Ad hoc changes to requirements (scope creep)
Aggressive timelines
Constrained human resources
Lack of skills
Lack of budget
Organizational issues
Use of leading edge technologies
Global projects
Software deployment projects that span geographies in a globally dispersed
organization can be faced with challenges from:
Multiple native languages that require interpretation and translation skills
Multiple time zones that can make it difficult to schedule project checkpoint
calls and meetings
Diverse cultures and work habits including different weekend and holiday
schedules for needed project task owners who have deliverables due
Multivendor projects
Companies might ask several vendors of IT products and services to work
together on delivering a business solution to the stakeholders. Each vendor can
easily provide subject matter expertise in their own offerings, but might not have

Appendix B. Managing complex software deployment projects
195
the integrative skills and experience to bring the solution delivery team together
and provide a single point-of-contact to the stakeholders and Executive Business
Sponsor.
Changing requirements
The more important a project is to sponsors and stakeholders, the more likely
there is to be “scope creep”, for example, unscheduled changes in functional and
operational scope of the solution beyond the originally agreed-upon deliverables.
The project team might have severe difficulties accommodating ad hoc requests,
even though outside observers find the requests completely appropriate. An
example is changing the type of phone needed for mobile services to be
delivered or factoring in a new technological advance to a Smarter Planet
solution that can result in reduced project costs. For more information about the
IBM vision of the Smarter Planet, visit:
http://www.ibm.com/smarterplanet/us/en/?ca=v_smarterplanet
There might not be a formal or informal-but-agreed-upon change management
method to handle such project change requests.
Aggressive timelines
Well-architected, software-intensive solutions with clear value to stakeholders
and sponsors will inevitably have aggressive delivery timelines. That is not to say
that these are the only kinds of aggressive software deployment projects. There
can be important upgrades and migration and maintenance projects with
aggressive timelines as well.
The stress of aggressive schedules can have a disruptive impact on project
deliverables. Also, there can be a strong dependency on task A being completed
before task B can begin (in waterfall development, for example), which
exacerbates the impact.
Constrained human resources
In an ideal world, the project sponsors and stakeholders determine the
necessary funding to successfully deploy the project. In the real world, sponsors
and stakeholders can change between the conceptual design acceptance phase
and the delivery phase, and this can impact funding and available personnel.
Skills that were acquired during the conceptual phases might not be available
just when they are needed in the delivery phase, perhaps due to a
reorganization.

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Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
It might be difficult or impossible to reuse skills if there are no project guidelines
for reuse and there is no accountability for documenting important results and
lessons learned.
Lack of skills
In this section we discuss lack of skills in specific areas and how it can impact a
project.
Product knowledge
There can be a dependence on the vendor or vendors to supply the skills and
human resources to deliver the project. But solutions that depend on middleware
require skills transfer to the client to support ongoing standard operating
procedures for the products in the solution. If the skills transfer to the client does
not occur during the implementation phase, the viability of the solution can be
jeopardized.
Architecture
Enterprise IT architects, business sector architects, and domain-specific
architects might or might not exist within the client’s organization. Ideally, they
exist and are consulted during the conceptual solution design phase and applied
the right requirements to the right set of solution deliverables. Often, however,
architects are consulted first during the implementation phase or are not
consulted at all, which leads to less well-thought-out solutions that might not
satisfy the stakeholders, sponsors, and users.
Industry skills
Software solution designers must understand the industry context of the solution
they are designing to select the right technologies for the solution. Software
solution designers also must understand the industry context of the solution they
are designing, so that the most important workloads are handled correctly,
perform reliably and securely, and with acceptable performance. If these skills
are lacking, the more non-specific the solution is, the less likely it will satisfy all of
the key stakeholders. The right technologies and benchmarks are best defined
by industry subject matter experts (SMEs) who have experience in real world
workloads and industry trends with regard to those workloads.
Lack of budget
Companies in developed market economies have just experienced a severe
economic recession that is just ending after three years of downward pressure on
capital and operational expenditures. Companies in emerging market economies

Appendix B. Managing complex software deployment projects
197
have weathered the recession better, although they might have other economic
issues that the project budget is inadequate to resolve, such as a lack of needed
infrastructure or skilled personnel. In general, both types of companies must
prepare to do more with less.
Organizational issues
This section discusses additional organizational issues, beyond those identified
thus far, that can impact the success of software deployment projects.
Process issues
Several specific process issues that make deployment projects more complex
are procurement processes for needed IT resources, such as servers, networks,
storage, firewall ports, new cryptography, and identity management and directory
services. There are also IT service management processes for fault, problem,
change, configuration, disaster recovery, asset management, usage and
accounting management that might be inadequate to deliver the solution on time
and within budget.
Business mergers and divestitures
Certain large, global companies (IBM included) have a long history of
acquisitions that continue to the present day. Others (also including IBM)
experience business divestitures and spin-offs. Smaller companies can be
acquired and taken over by new management. When such events occur within
the time frame of a sponsored software deployment project, they can have a
significant impact on project milestones for key deliverables. The project might
even come to a full stop.
Approaches to solving issues
There are key principles that, when practiced during complex software
deployment project delivery, can help:
Enterprise view
Reusability
Collaboration and communication
Efficiency
Agility
These principles can be rewarded when they are adopted. This is one of the key
expectations of project managers. Adoption of these principles at the outset
improves morale and teamwork and leads to successful outcomes.

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Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
Collaboration tools and techniques
In a global, multilingual, multicultural project team, it is important to offer
collaboration on demand. Anyone on the team must be able to request a call,
chat, virtual meeting, or webcast with appropriate SMEs and have effective,
two-way communications with them. There are tools available to help project
team members to accomplish the tasks at hand.
IBM LotusLive
LotusLive™ is a set of public cloud software services that provide capabilities to
define communities, wikis, blogs, activities, and user profiles, host web
conferences and webcasts, send email, have chat sessions in real time, and
connect using mobile devices. Because it is a Software as a Service (SaaS)
offering from IBM, it supports the flexible, pay-as-you-go user pricing model for
consumers of these services.
Collaborative development
When the success of the software deployment project depends on updated code,
the project team must be able to share and reuse the source code, artifacts, test
results, and documentation. Agile development methods within a global team
demand event-based automation to progress the iterative development life cycle.
IBM tools, such as Rational Team Concert™ and Rational Asset Manager and a
service such as IBM Agile Development services, can be used towards these
collaborative development techniques.
Project management
Project stakeholders demand a single point-of-contact to communicate project
status. In a complex software deployment project, the process to determine the
single point-of-contact is, by itself, a challenge. There is a natural selection
process during the life cycle of the project. Generally speaking, stakeholders
determine who the true project lead is and select that person as the single
point-of-contact. This often happens both on the client side and the solution
provider side of a project, so there can be two single points-of-contact who work
closely together to communicate status.
Client project lead role
This individual knows the interests of the stakeholders and communicates often
with the solution provider team to ensure that all tasks and deliverables are on
track and that any issues or outages are reported and addressed.

Appendix B. Managing complex software deployment projects
199
Enterprise architecture
Enterprise architecture is the discipline of designing and determining the layers
of enterprise IT services that support the business goals of the client. Clients with
multiple data centers and multiple lines of business typically also have an
enterprise architecture practice and one or more enterprise architects (EA).
The role of the enterprise architect
The EA role is to anticipate and address gaps in the enterprise IT architecture by
defining technology standards that allow the client to close those gaps when
acquiring new technology and managing existing technology investments. The
client must assign an EA to oversee and support complex software deployment
projects. Also, the client project lead and the solution delivery team can contact
the EA when a need exists for enterprise technology services to support the
project team, such as collaboration or information management services.
Change management
Software deployment projects can involve infrastructure and operational IT
service management solutions and application development. The needs of
developers during the software development life cycle might not automatically
align with the needs of system administrators and those responsible for achieving
the service level agreements (SLAs) for a given solution. Agreeing upon a
change management discipline prior to the onset of the project is crucial to
success.
Formal change management discipline
The client project lead and the solution delivery team lead need to agree on the
change management tools and procedures for requesting, accepting, and
rejecting changes to the project timing, deliverables, and budget.
IBM resources
IBM has many kinds of professional resources available to clients to help realize
the value of IBM software solutions.
Client Technical Professionals
This IBM personnel include Client Technical Advisors, Software Client Architects,
Software Brand IT Specialists, and Hardware Brand Field Technical Sales
Specialists. All of these client technical professionals can be involved to help
resolve issues that prevent successful software deployment.

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Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
IBM Software Group Lab Services
IBM Software Group Lab Services are available on a contracted fee basis to
provide deep product configuration and implementation skills. There are IBM
Software Group Lab Services available for each IBM Software Group brand.
Solutions that are cross-brand in nature can involve more than one statement of
work (SoW) or contract. See Appendix C, “Services offerings” on page 203.
For more information about IBM Software Group Lab Services, visit:
http://www-03.ibm.com/systems/services/labservices/
IBM Software Group Subscription and Support
IBM Passport Advantage Subscription and Support (S&S) is paid for on an
annual basis and provides for release upgrades, severity 1, 24/7 problem
support, product enhancement requests, and the ability to obtain history of past
incidents with products in the account, among other benefits. IBM Software
Group S&S, when renewed on an annual basis, provides for uninterrupted
coverage of the IBM products that are necessary to the success of a solution.
See Appendix C, “Services offerings” on page 203.
For more information about IBM Software Group S&S, visit:
https://www-01.ibm.com/software/info/business/renewal/video/index.jsp
IBM Accelerated Value Program
Certain IBM products that are part of a complex software deployment project can
benefit from the additional coverage provided by the IBM Accelerated Value
Program, formerly known as IBM Premium Support. The key additional benefit of
the IBM Accelerated Value Program over IBM Software Group S&S is the ability
for the client to work with an IBM single point of contact who acquires familiarity
with the account’s organization and requirements and can help the client
navigate and resolve complex product issues. See Appendix C, “Services
offerings” on page 203.
For more information about the IBM this program, visit:
http://www-01.ibm.com/software/support/acceleratedvalue/
IBM Global Technology Services
IBM Global Technology Services are available on a contract basis to provide
planning, assessment, risk management, and implementation skills, which can
be delivered across multiple vendors who need to participate in a complex
software deployment project. IBM Global Technology Services has multiple
brands, including cloud computing, strategic outsourcing, data center, and other

Appendix B. Managing complex software deployment projects
201
infrastructure consulting services. See Appendix C, “Services offerings” on
page 203.
For more information about IBM Global Technology Services, visit:
http://www-935.ibm.com/services/us/en/it-services/gts-it-service-home-p
age-1.html
IBM Global Business Services
IBM Global Business Services includes business consultancy and systems
integration services that can remediate gaps in industry skills associated with the
adoption of new technologies in the solution design. See Appendix C, “Services
offerings” on page 203.
For more information about IBM Global Business Services, visit:
http://www-935.ibm.com/services/us/gbs/bao/
Private development and test clouds
When the time needed to procure development and test (
dev/test
) environments
is scarce, the enterprise architects and operations teams might consider a
private dev/test cloud computing solution. The private dev/test cloud deploys a
server or desktop stack of standard middleware products to the server with a
well-defined life cycle for those virtual resources. A self-service portal interface is
provided for users and administrators. Service reporting and analytics are
available to management to show service consumption of energy and other
resources in the private cloud. IBM has multiple products and services to help
clients create and realize the value of dev/test clouds.
Public development and test clouds
Public cloud service providers can provide dev/test environments for the needs of
shorter term software deployment projects that are not considered enterprise
scale workloads and that require the management of proprietary information.
When the software deployment project needs to create proprietary data with
retention requirements, a private cloud or traditional IT infrastructure with
firewalls is usually a better solution than a public cloud.
Hybrid clouds
Hybrid clouds combine public cloud services with private cloud or non-cloud
services. Some form of integration is necessary in a hybrid cloud

202
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
implementation. The IBM Software Group WebSphere Cast Iron appliance is an
example of the kind of integration capability that is required by hybrid clouds.
Cloud assessment services
IBM has many services offerings that enable clients to assess the suitability of
particular workloads to run in a public or private cloud. IBM client technical
professionals, such as account client technical advisors, architects, and brand
specialists, are available to help you to navigate these offerings and recommend
the right ones to help execute successful software solutions.

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2011. All rights reserved.
203
Appendix C.
Services offerings
C

204
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
About this appendix
In this Appendix, we provide a reference list of IBM services organizations and a
few of the relevant offerings provided to accelerate value from your software
deployment projects.
IBM Software Services
IBM Software Services, also known as IBM Software Group Lab Services, is a
team of highly skilled consultants with broad architectural knowledge, deep
technical skills, and best practice expertise. Engaging this team grants you
access to some of the deepest product, consulting, and training skills in the
world. Software Services has close relationships with our development labs,
ensuring that you have access to the latest technologies over the life of your
project. The Software Services experts focus exclusively on providing technical
services, training for IBM solutions, and integrating other supported platforms to
help you use your solution as quickly and as fully as possible. With an IBM
technical expert by your side, you can minimize your risk, maximize your
investment, and meet your business goals.
Whether you are already using software from IBM or are considering the
advantages of an IBM solution, IBM Software Services can help you to meet your
business goals and use the full range of software from IBM, including Tivoli, DB2,
Lotus, Rational, and WebSphere. Depending on your needs, the following
lab-based groups can provide deep technical guidance:
IBM Software Services for WebSphere
IBM Software Services for Lotus
IBM Software Services for Rational
IBM Software Services for Tivoli
IBM Information Management Services
There are other benefits to using IBM Software Services, including the ability to:
Minimize implementation risks by having direct access to IBM Software Group
expertise and development labs
Accelerate your product deployment using their deep technical knowledge
Provide mentoring, best practices, and skills transfer
Provide implementation, migration, architectural design services, and
customized workshops and education

Appendix C. Services offerings
205
Take advantage of engagements that focus on newly introduced IBM brand
technologies that are generally in a .0 release (for example, WebSphere
Process Server v7.0)
Utilize engagements that focus on guiding your efforts to be successful
The ultimate measure of success of IBM Lab Services is that of ensuring your
success in installing and configuring our software, all the way to applying it to
your business needs and deploying it in your environment.
Table 9-2 shows some of the standard offerings from IBM Software Services.
Table 9-2 IBM Software Services offerings
Offering Description Description of services Expected
outcome
Project
Scoping
Workshop
Careful project planning
early in the project cycle
with expertise from a
Product Specialist
provides greater
assurance of
successful project
outcome.
A Specialist will help you define the
project from a business and technical
perspective, identify software
requirements, identify skill and
education prerequisites, identify best
engagement approach, discuss
staffing and funding issues, and
assess proposed project dates.
Project proposal
including high
level
requirements, high
level education
plan and an
implementation
roadmap with
project delivery
dates
Architecture
and Design
Workshop
The workshop focuses
on the design and
validation of your IBM
Software solution. A
Solution architect will
assist in defining project
requirements and
designing the
appropriate solution
using IBM software
technologies.
A Specialist will discuss network
topology of the production solution,
discuss overall software architecture,
guide design activities for a small
vertical slice of an application, discuss
development best practices and
performance best practices, and help
develop a project plan and risk
analysis.
Topology and
architecture
diagrams, outline
of overall solution,
project plan and
risk analysis

206
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
Quick Start Quick Start services at
the beginning of the
project provide the
expertise to jump start
the implementation and
shorten the project life
cycle. Services include
installation, skills
transfer, and
development and
deployment of an
example solution.
A Services Specialist will provide a
working installation in a staging
environment, provide hands on skills
transfer and mentoring designing,
developing and deploying a sample
solution identified for your project,
apply best practices, and establish
critical success factors.
Installation of
product in a
staging
environment,
lectures and
interactive
sessions, hands
on development
and deployment
skills transfer
Performance
Review and
Tuning
This offering takes
place during the
implementation stage of
your application to
assess the
performance of your
application and identify
areas for improvement
to maximize overall
performance.
A Services Specialist will help you
establish hardware and software
configuration, establish application
level instrumentation, identify and
measure performance tuning
objectives, and measure and
document iterative benchmarks.
Iterative
performance
benchmarks and
benchmark plan,
performance
tuning
recommendations,
application level
performance
instrumentation,
written report
documenting
review and
recommendations
Diagnostic
Assessments /
Health Check
The health check
consists of detailed and
valuable audits to
review the effectiveness
and efficiency of the
production environment
and pinpoint areas for
improvement
A Services Specialist will conduct an
installation audit focusing on system
architecture, application structures,
infrastructure, systems integration,
security and maintenance, an end
user audit focusing on functionality
and usability, and a sizing and
performance audit focusing on service
level requirements, transaction
throughput, growth rates and overall
performance.
Detailed report
outlining the
health of the
environment,
areas for
improvement and
recommended
actions

Appendix C. Services offerings
207
Deployment
Readiness
Assessment
Prepare for a
successful deployment
by assessing the quality
of systems and
processes to verify that
the site meets
predefined
requirements for
number of hits per
second, response time,
capacity, and
concurrent users.
A Services Specialist will assess your
hardware and software configurations
including databases, middleware and
legacy systems, develop
performance, scalability, durability and
stability evaluation scripts and tests,
and assess the procedures for change
control, source control, problem
tracking and crisis resilience.
Assessment
findings report
including
recommended
actions and
deployment
schedule
Application
Review
This offering
determines whether the
application is fit for its
intended purpose,
addresses application
scalability and
compliance to
standards, and provides
best practices
mentoring.
A Services Specialist will evaluate
deviations from product standards,
evaluate tool usage patterns, address
scalability concerns and provide
mentoring best practices. The offering
is customizable and can include
Architecture Review, Development
and Deployment Tooling Practices
Review, and a Scalability and
Performance Review.
Report which will
identify and
address tactical
and strategic
issues, outline a
set of immediate
remedies, and
identify
architectural
issues requiring
further
investigation
Migration
Assessment
and
Implementatio
n
A Specialist helps you
quickly get the software
version migration
project on the right track
by developing a
migration roadmap.
A Services Specialist will conduct a
migration workshop to define the
migration project, identify software
requirements, identify skill and
education prerequisites, and review
and identify impact to application
code, development environment, build
processes, staging and production
environments, deployment processes,
configuration processes, and testing
requirements. As a follow on ISSx can
perform migration code reviews,
infrastructure migration, application
deployment and performance tuning.
Overall SOA
governance,
ongoing mentoring
and guidance,
asset adoption
workshops,
technology pilots,
ongoing
infrastructure
assistance
Education and
Training
Assist the client with
IBM Software Group
product-specific
training.
The consultant would meet with the
client to identify what training gaps
existed, and then work with the client
to identify a combination of classroom
style instructor-lead training along
with online computer-based training.
Trained client
resources, training
collateral

208
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
Center of
Excellence
The Center of
Excellence combines
the expertise and
assets from multiple
IBM organizations. It
helps clients who have
made an
enterprise-wide
commitment to
architectural change
speed adoption of
change, mitigate risk,
and align
transformation with
industry best practices.
A Center of Excellence provides
assistance in the following key areas:
SOA Governance, Virtualized
Infrastructure, SOA Design and
Development, Security, and
Operations with Service
Management. The Center of
Excellence team of IBM Software
Group experts, Global Business
Services Enterprise Architecture
experts, and Integrated Technology
Services infrastructure experts brings
best of breed to supplement client
resources.
Overall
governance,
ongoing mentoring
and guidance,
asset adoption
workshops,
technology pilots,
ongoing
infrastructure
assistance
Quick win
Pilots
Deliver a tangible
solution to the
business in 10 weeks or
less.
An early win will
accelerate adoption of
the software you
purchased.
A Quick Win pilot helps you in
deploying a solution into a limited
production. For a successful Quick
Win Pilot, IBM experts
will team with your subject matter
experts (SMEs),
business users, IT representatives
(architects and
developers), project managers and
project owners.
End-to-end
execution of the
pilot solution
Business
Value
Accelerators
Demonstrate potential
impact to the bottom
line based on customer
specific scenarios and
input
For companies that are in industries
that are asset intensive, such as
telecom, manufacturing, high-tech
etc, and asset management costs
comprise a significant portion of their
cost structure and are looking at better
return on assets and reduced costs
The Business Value Assessment
draws from both IBM software and
IBM services expertise and
knowledge, to give the client both a
technical and a process view. The
output provides a clear picture of the
potential benefits and returns of
implementing an Asset Management
solution, as they apply to the client
business.
Rapid
Deployment
Services
Provides Automated
middleware deployment
capability based on IBM
best Practices

Appendix C. Services offerings
209
Global Business Services
Global Business Services is the consulting arm of IBM that delivers integrated
e-business solutions that customers need to compete in a globally integrated
enterprise. Global Business Services is the world's largest group of IT
consultancy services.
Global Business Services has expertise across many industries, helping
companies to capitalize on new business models, re-engineer core processes,
implement packaged solutions, and create management systems to help you
manage top projects. IBM Global Business Services can help you to use the
latest capabilities to optimize business performance and deliver higher value. All
of the IBM Global Business Services business lines provide access to a full
range of technical and business solutions.
The Global Business Services strategy is based on:
Deeper client relationships: Global Business Services is deeply focused on a
set of core clients who represent the bulk of our revenue and profit. We use
insights from these accounts to drive our solutions capabilities into other
opportunities
Differentiated services: Business solutions, application management
services, and SOA, which underpins it all, are what differentiate IBM
Global delivery: Strategies are delivered globally by means of our Centers of
Excellence
Global Business Services has several offerings that span across numerous
industry sectors and service areas, such as:
Application innovation services
Application management services
Enterprise application services
Business analytics and management services
Strategy and transformation services
Financial management services
Supply chain management services
Human capital management services
For more information, contact your IBM representative or visit:
http://www.ibm.com/gbs

210
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
Global Technology Services
Global Technology Services helps clients reduce costs, improve productivity, and
assert their competitive advantage with a comprehensive portfolio of
assessment, outsourcing, infrastructure, and systems integration services. The
main components of Global Technology Services are:
Managed Business Services
Managed Business Services combines the IBM deep industry and process
expertise with innovative technologies with a talented labor force to identify
and address high-pain, high-cost, back-office processes in four key solutions
areas (CRM, F&A, HR and SCM) and key verticals, such as the lending
industry. Managed Business Services offers clients and vendors repeatable,
multi-tenant processes and assets that deliver predictable results, improved
process productivity, cost savings, and reduced risk, thereby allowing you to
focus your resources on strategic business areas.
Strategic Outsourcing
Serving as the IT backbone, the Strategic Outsourcing business line offers
data center, network, desktop outsourcing, and management services for
output devices. Strategic Outsourcing deals are typically complex, highly
customized solutions, focused on transforming the client’s IT environment.
Strategic Outsourcing contracts range in size from multi-year, multi-million US
dollar deals, to smaller agreements of a more limited scope. Regardless of
size, outsourcing deals help clients to reduce costs and improve productivity
through outsourcing their processes and operations, and they often involve
some degree of consolidation and optimization of the client’s IT environment.
In some cases, a client’s IT employees become IBMers. When IBM manages
and operates parts of the IT area of another company, a mutually beneficial
agreement provides service level assurances to ensure excellent service
delivery.
Integrated Technology Services
Each service product line in the Integrated Technology Services portfolio
contains repeatable service products that draw from the skilled employees at
IBM. These services complement hardware from the IBM Service and
Technology Group and software from the IBM Software Group. These
asset-based, standardized and global service products are as easy to buy,
consume, and pay for as are our hardware and software products. They are
deployed consistently and efficiently around the world, accelerating our
clients’ time-to-value. Integrated Technology Services partners closely with
the IBM Systems and Technology Group and IBM Software Group to more
easily and effectively give clients what they want: end-to-end solutions.
Solutions are available for organizations of all sizes, in all industries, with a
focus on delivery.

Appendix C. Services offerings
211
Maintenance and Technical Support Services
Maintenance and Technical Support Services consists of a portfolio of
support services from product maintenance through solution support to
maintain and improve the availability of client IT infrastructure. These services
help clients minimize the risk of downtime and avoid outages, identify the
source of problems in a complex environment, and recover from issues
quickly.
Systems and Technology Group Lab Services
IBM’s Hardware division is known as the Systems and Technology Group, and it
has it’s own services organisation focused on deployment and value from the
hardware solutions and their integration to software. IBM Systems and
Technology Group Lab Services helps infuse intelligence in the way the world’s
information technology works. We focus on driving down costs by designing
flexible infrastructures, while, at the same time, managing risk through the use of
deep technical skills and training expertise.
We help to optimize the use of your data center and system solutions. We are
focused on new technologies that are emerging from IBM product development
labs and the delivery and training of new and important niche, mature, and
end-of-life market technologies.
IBM Systems and Technology Group Lab Services offer a range of services
important in the successful implementation of any software on IBM platorms:
Systems Software Services
Our staff is armed with a comprehensive knowledge of products and solutions
that can help you to establish and benefit from smarter management and
energy cost reductions, virtualization, security, and availability. Let us share
our experience in integration and optimization of physical and virtual
environments and technical consulting services to efficiently cut costs and
complexity, manage risk, and deliver flexible new services models.
Power Services
IBM POWER® processor-based Linux, IBM i and IBM AIX systems combine
leadership performance, energy efficiency and flexible virtualization and
availability features. These products and technologies are designed to reduce
costs, improve service and reduce risk for mission critical applications and
highly virtualized, consolidated operating environments.
The IBM Systems Lab Services and Training Power Services team is fully
experienced in technology implementation in Power Systems™

212
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
environments. We provide proven consulting in installation, migration, porting,
application architecture and development, performance tuning and hands-on
skills transfer. This highly-trained arm of the IBM Power Systems development
lab offers comprehensive knowledge of and experience with the products and
solutions that can help you get more from your Power Systems investment.
System x® / BladeCenter® Services
Our team helps clients worldwide with IBM System x technology deployment,
on-site consulting and skills building. Local or global, we offer System x
services in IBM System Management and our Integrated Solutions, IBM eX5
technologies and virtualization. Whether training staff at your site, getting you
up to speed quickly with an Accelerator! Engagement, performance testing or
design review, we have services to meet your needs. We’re ready to share our
high quality, field-tested offerings and resources and bring custom solutions to
your enterprise.
Mainframe Services
Develop and deploy server and storage solutions for IBM System z. Our
mainframe services help clients worldwide realize security, availability and
data serving solutions for Linux on System z, IBM z/VM® or IBM z/OS
environments.
IBM Systems Lab Services and Training has the intellectual and technical
advantage of the System z development lab, here to assist as you take
advantage of emerging technologies on the System z platform. We can
provide custom solutions, leading-edge consulting and support services and
proof of concepts to meet your business requirements now and strategic
initiatives moving forward.
Storage Services
The Storage Services team is well-versed and experienced in all aspects of
storage technology deployment in IBM System Storage® environments, as
well as assessment of storage infrastructures in both IBM and non-IBM
environments. We provide storage services in storage efficiency/best
practices consulting, technical consulting, implementation and configuration,
migration and replication, security, consolidation and deduplication. The team
can assist in storage management and technical project management and
offer hands-on product skills transfer.
Let us share our comprehensive knowledge of the products and solutions for
System Storage disk, tape, network-attached storage, SAN, storage
virtualization, in-line data deduplication and the IBM XIV® Storage System.
With standard and customized services and leading-edge consulting and
support, we can help you meet the needs of your business and your strategic
initiatives.

Appendix C. Services offerings
213
Data Center Services
Power, cooling or space issues don’t have to limit your IT plans. Uncertain
about how or where to begin to improve data center energy productivity or
effectiveness? Data Center Services can help find ways to get your project
started or re-energized. We are a highly trained extension of IBM's
development laboratories with the most up-to-date knowledge of industry
trends, IT technologies and best practices.
Optimize the benefits and energy savings of IT Virtualization and
consolidation projects. Uncover energy wastes such as thermal hot spots or
where over cooling occur. Plan IT hardware placement for optimal data center
resource availability and utilization. Understand liquid cooling as a
performance and energy saving feature. Distinguish DC power as an
alternative power source for IT systems. Determine if you have contaminants
or environmental conditions in your data center which can affect operations.
Define and size IT load requirements if you’re considering or designing a new
or consolidated data center. Learn about, implement and monitor
environmental and IT systems. We’ll compare the energy efficiency and
productivity of IBM versus other available products and how they can
integrate with other systems in your data center. You’ll come away with an
understanding of IBM's approach for reducing carbon emissions and how
workload-optimized systems can help extend the life of your data center.
IT Optimization Consulting Services
The IT Optimization Consulting Services team is well-versed, experienced
and ready to provide platform independent consulting for IT optimization and
virtualization studies. Studies combine IT cost analysis and technical
architecture using real client data and platform neutral recommendations to
help reduce capital expenditures and ongoing operating costs. We will provide
a business case comparison of your current system spending versus
advanced technology future or the costs of running IBM Systems solutions.
Leverage technology to increase server infrastructure optimization and
virtualization. Increase operating system image consolidation. Quantify the
incremental costs of ownership to support platform recommendations.
Position the client infrastructure to support strategic growth and accept new
workloads. Improve client rate structure/IT charge-back methodology.
Systems Agenda Consulting Services
Simply put, a Systems Agenda is a thoughtful plan which aligns the full power
and potential of the latest IT technologies with your business objectives. A
Systems Agenda is a unique and powerful guide, developed and executed in
concert with your specific strategic initiatives that can help you get the most
out of information technology.

214
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
The IBM Systems Agenda team can help clients establish a Systems Agenda
of their own, different from any other, and realize their implementation goals.
A key component is the Systems Agenda Engagement, in which our highly
experienced consultants use a proven and specialized executive-level
methodology. Your engagement begins with a client orientation and
preparation followed by a customized on-site workshop of 1-to-2 days. The
workshop is designed to help CIOs and the leadership team work together to
develop a common point of view of business and IT strategies, issues and
plans. Typical activities can include: identify and confirm strategic business
initiatives/goals/objectives, explore the current and future state of IT and how
it will support business strategies, identify challenges and gaps moving
towards the desired IT state and develop the client’s unique Systems Agenda.
When your agenda is established, and if a genuine interest in a
transformational partnership exists, the Systems Agenda Executive
consultant will remain engaged in a mutually agreed to partnership role with
the Executive sponsor, committed solely to the client’s success as the agenda
is refined, communicated, validated and implemented for the transformation
time frame, at no charge. Our success is measured completely on the
Executive sponsor’s success and satisfaction with our involvement.
Business Partner services
In addition to all of the services provided directly from IBM, you can also take
advantage of service offerings provided by our eco-system of Business Partners.
Business Partners are recognized for their services delivery competencies. They
incorporate these competencies into a business strategy that is constructed to
grow revenue, expand services, increase market share, and provide complete
customer solutions. These services providers have access to IBM intellectual
capital, as well as comprehensive IBM technical support and services education.
This relationship enables our Business Partners to provide a wide range of
software and services options to address your requirements. This relationship
incorporates services that include capabilities, competencies, methodologies,
and packaged offerings for targeted market segments. The result is increased
customer confidence when clients turn to our Business Partners for needed
business solutions.
The key elements of the services provider relationship include:
Approved services
The business site controlled and operated by the Business Partner meets the
IBM requirements for approved services.

Appendix C. Services offerings
215
Services personnel
Individuals with skills and capabilities that might include:
– Applicable product, services, and support training
– Professional certification in chosen product areas (IBM and non-IBM)
– Demonstrated hands-on services knowledge and proficiency by passing
knowledge- and performance-based professional exams
– Experiential knowledge verified by customer references and satisfaction
Approved services
IBM approves the services providers for their capabilities, competencies,
methodologies, and packaged offerings that can be delivered. These services
can be IBM developed and branded services, IBM developed and
non-branded services, or non-IBM developed services.
For more information about Business Partner services, visit the PartnerWorld®
website at:
http://www-2000.ibm.com/partnerworld/pwhome.nsf/weblook/index_us.html

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Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2010. All rights reserved.
217
Index
A
Accelerated Value Program
Guidance provided 100
Single point of contact, 100
Why choose it? 100
B
Benefits of deployment efficiency and a relationship
with IBM 3
Best practices of software deployment
Centralize software fulfillment and license
management 53
Commit to self-sufficiency 59
Communicate and market the vision 59
Conduct workshops to assure deployment read-
iness 57
Define a governance structure 52
Define your return on investment and
time-to-value 56
Engage consulting and implementation
services 55
Identify an executive business sponsor and
stakeholders 50
Identify resource management 59
Business and IT alignment as software deployment
accelerators 101
Business Partner architect, role of 27
Business Partner services 214
Business Value Assessment 8
C
Case study
Demonstrating best practices 166
Demonstrating centralized software fulfillment
and license management 55
Demonstrating deployment readiness 59
Demonstrating software deployment best prac-
tices 48
Demonstrating the Accelerated Value Program
118
Demonstrating the identificaiton of executive
business sponsor and stakeholders 51
Centralizing software fulfillment and license man-
agement (best practice) 53
Challenges, client perspective 4
Change management or substitution report 31
Client lab advocacy program
A software deployment accelerator 94
How the program works 94
Inner circle program 96
Lab advocate 95
Client perspective
challenges in deployment ownership 4
organizational challenges 5
technical challenges 6
Client responsibilities related to support 163
Client roles and responsibilities
Consultants 25
Enterprise IT Architect 24
Executive business sponsor 23
Other stakeholders and project sponsors 24
Procurement officer 24
Program manager 23
Project Managers 24
Project team members 25
Client Technical Professionals, role of 199
Cloud assessment services 202
Commit to self-sufficiency (best practice) 59
Communicate, market the vision (best practice) 59
Compliance management tools
Introduction 79
Tivoli License Compliance Manager 80
Conduct workshops to assure readiness
(best practice) 57
Consultants, role of 25
Consulting services, engaging IBM in 55
D
Define a governance structure (best practice) 52
Define your return on investment and time-to-value
(best practice) 56
Deployment efficiency, benefits of 3
Deployment method
See
software deployment method
Deployment ownership, client perspective 4

218
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
Deployment plan
Executing 39
Implememting 17
E
End of service report for products 88
Engage consulting services (best practice) 55
Enterprise Architect, role of 199
Enterprise architecture and portfolio management
63
Enterprise architecture process, defined 65
Enterprise IT Architect, the client role 24
Escalating an incident 162
Executing the deployment plan 39
Executive business sponsor
Identifying 50
The client role 23
F
Foundational level offerings, IBM software support
145
Frameworks, models, and other reusable assets
Example from the banking industry 105
Introduction 104
Free training programs and tools
DeveloperWorks website 133
IBM Redbooks 133
G
Global Business Services 209
Global Technology Services 210
Globalization report 89
Governance, defining the structure of 52
Guidances provided by IBM
Frameworks, models, and reusable assets 104
IBM Global Solution Centers 107
H
Hard ROIs, measuring 12
Hybrid clouds 201
I
IBM Accelerated Value Program 200
IBM architect, role of 25
IBM client executive, the role 25
IBM enterprise deployment manager, role of 25
IBM Enterprise Software Management Tool 77
IBM Global Business Services 201
IBM Global Solution Centers 107
IBM Global Technology Services, role of 200
IBM IT specialists, role of 27
IBM License Metric Tool 76
IBM LotusLive 198
IBM roles and responsibilities
IBM architect 25
IBM client executive 25
IBM enterprise deployment manager 25
IBM IT specialists 27
IBM software client leader 25
IBM services
Engaging with 55
IBM services for software deployment 117
Accelerated deployment, products
and solutions 117
Advanced support services 116
Consultancy and integration services 118
Education services 117
Implementation services 118
Solution design services 117
Why do you need them? 114
IBM Services offerings 203
Business Partner services 214
Global Business Services 209
Global Technology Services 210
IBM Software Services 204
Systems and Technology Group
Lab Services 211
IBM software client leader, role of 25
IBM Software Group Lab Services, role of 200
IBM Software Group Subscription and Support
(S&S)
Defined 200
IBM Software Support Center
See Subscription and Support (S&S)
IBM solution review
Focus of the review 97
Introduction 97
Process 98
IBM Systems and Technology Group
Lab Services 211
IBM Tivoli License Manager 78
IBM’s SoftwareXcel for System z 148
Identify an executive business sponsor (best prac-
tice) 50
Identify resource management (best practice) 59
Identify stakeholders (best practice) 50

Index
219
Implement and measure success 18
Implement your deployment plan 17
Implementation services, engaging IBM in 55
Incidents
Escalating 162
Incidents not covered 162
Inner circle program 96
Issues that inhibit value realization, managing 14
IT portfolio management in EA governance 66
L
Client lab advocacy program 94
Lab advocacy program
See Client lab advocacy program
Lab services
See Software Group Lab Services
Software Group Lab Services 200
Licensing
Centralizing license management 53
License acquisition and entitlement 90
License agreements, keeping them active 151
License and asset management tools 74
License and compliance management 70
Taking control of 75
M
Mainframe Monthly License Charge 145
Mainframe One-Time Charge license 145
Managing issues that inhibit value realization 14
Measure deployment success 44
Measuring hard and soft ROIs 11
Monthly License Charge (System z only) 155
O
Operating system reports 82
Organizational challenges, client perspective 5
Other challenges, client perspective 7
P
Passport Advantage (self-help tool)
License acquisition and entitlement 90
Software maintenance 90
The value of 144
Plan a resolution for issues 17
PoC best practices 124
Portfolio management software, tools 72
Premium Support
Introduction 149
Options 145
Prepare for deployment 33
Private development and test clouds 201
Proactive support from the Accelerated Value Pro-
gram 99
Problem management from the Accelerated Value
Program 100
Problem management self-help tool 90
Procurement officer, role of 24
Product management software, tools 72
Productivity enhancement 100
Program manager, role of 23
Project management software, tools 72
Project management, identifying 59
Project managers, role of 24
Project team members, role of 25
Proof of Concept (PoC)
Introduction 123
PoC best practices 124
When does a PoC take place? 124
Proof of Technology (PoT)
Attend a prescheduled PoT 92
How are PoTs delivered? 93
Introduction 92
When do you need it? 92
Public development and test clouds 201
R
Rapid Deployment Services
Benefits 123
Introduction 121
Readiness plan 29
Recognize issues that inhibit value realization 15
Relationsihp with IBM, benefits of 3
Reports
End of service report 88
Globalization report 89
Operating system reports 82
To facilitate software product compatibility 84
Resolution, planning 17
Resource management, identifying 59
Response objectives, of IBM support 155
Return on investment (ROI), defining 56
Roles
See Client roles and responsibilities
See IBM roles and responsibilities
See Third party roles and responsibilities

220
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment
S
S&S
See Subscription and Support (S&S)
Self-help support tools 148
Self-help tools for accelerating deployment 90
License acquisition and entitlement with Pass-
port Advantage 90
Problem management 90
Software maintenance with
Passport Advantage 91
Self-sufficiency, committing to 59
Server virtualization environment reports 87
Service offerings for software deployment
Proof of Concept (PoC) 123
Rapid Deployment Services 121
Services
IBM implementation services 55
Services offerings 203
Services organizations at IBM
IBM Global Business Services 125
IBM Global Technology Services 126
IBM Software Services 126
IBM Systems and Technology Group Lab Ser-
vices 126
Introduction 125
Single point of contact, Accelerated
Value Program 100
Soft ROIs, measuring 13
Software Accelerated Value Program 98
Software deployment
Best practices 50
Framework 8
Software deployment accelerators
Accelerated Value Program 98
Client lab advocacy program 94
IBM solution review 97
Introduction 91
Proof of Technology (PoT) 92
Software deployment challenges
Aggressive timelines 195
Approaches to solving issues 197
Change management 199
Collaboration tools and techniques 198
Collaborative development 198
Enterprise Architecture 199
IBM LotusLive 198
IBM resources 199
Project management 198
Changing requirements 195
Constrained human resources 195
Global projects 194
Lack of budget 196
Lack of product knowledge 196
Lack of skills 196
Lack of skills in architecture 196
Lack of skills in the industry 196
Multivendor projects 194
Organizational issues 197
Business mergers and divestitures 197
Process issues 197
Software deployment method 32
DM0 Create the software deployment team 33
DM1 Review the contract content and other crit-
ical deployment documents 34
DM2 Understand the projects for deployment
35
DM3 Finalize software deployment plan 36
DM4 Conduct deployment kickoff meeting 37
DM5 Prepare and present the readiness plan
39
DM6 Execute quick deployment wins 40
DM7 Execute and monitor the deployment plan
41
DM8 Manage project and solution changes 43
DM9 Measure deployment success 44
Execute the deployment plan 39
Measure deployment success 44
Prepare for deployment 33
Software deployment plan 28
Software deployment projects, complexities 194
Software deployment roles, business partners 22
Software deployment tracking report 30
Software deployment work products 27
Change management or substitution report 31
Readiness plan 29
Software deployment plan 28
Software deployment tracking report 30
Software fulfillment, centralizing 53
Software license agreements
See Licensing
Software maintenance with Passport Advantage 91
Software Support Center
See Subscription and Support (S&S)
SoftwareXcel for System z customers (available in
select countries) 148
Stakeholders and project sponsors, client roles 24
Stakeholders, identifying 50
Subscription and Support (S&S)

Index
221
Before contacting the IBM Software Support
Center 156
Client responsibilities 163
Customized 145
Escalating an incident 162
Foundational offerings 145
Hours of operation 155
Incident, escalating 162
Incidents not covered 162
Monthly License Charge (mainframe) 145
Non-business hours, support during 156
One-Time Charge license (mainframe) 145
Other support offerings 147
IBM’s SoftwareXcel for System z customers
(available in select countries) 148
Premium Support 149
Self-help tools 148
Support Line 148
Passport Advantage 144
Premium support options, including the Acceler-
ated Value Program 145
Support Line 148
Support objectives
Monthly License Charge and System z inci-
dents 155
Software Support Center 155
Support during non-business hours 156
Value provided by 150
What does it include? 146
Support
See Subscription and Support (S&S)
T
Technical challenges, client perspective 6
Third party roles and responsibilities 27
Business partner architect 27
Time-to-value, defining 56
Tivoli License Compliance Manager, compliance
management tool 80
Tools
End of service report for products 88
For managing software deployment 71
For software deployment management 72
Globalization report 89
IBM Enterprise Software Management Tool 77
IBM Tivoli License Manager 78
In software deployment 71
License and asset management tools 74
Operating system reports 82
Other resources 71
Portfolio, product, and project management 72
Prerequisite reports 84
Self-help tools 90
Server virtualization environment reports 87
Software product compatibility 80
to assist with deployment challenges 8
To facilitate software deployment tracking 74
Training offerings 133
Distance learning (e-Learning) 137
Instructor-led online (ILO) training (virtual
classroom) 137
Free training programs and tools 132
Brand- or product-specific on the web 133
IBM Education Assistant 134
IBM Product Information Centers 134
IBM seminars and product roadshows 133
Mentoring from IBM specialists 133
User groups 133
IBM portfolio of training 132
Standard classroom training 134–135
Training paths 135
Training strategies
Implementation skills 131
Operations skills 131
Portfolio of training offerings 132
Required skill sets 130
Technical administration skills 131
User training 131
V
Value of enterprise architecture and portfolio man-
agement 68
Value realization
Approaches to achieving 8
Based on ROI 11
Implement the plan 17
Introduction 8
Key risk in 17
managing inhibiting issues 14
Measure success 18
Plan an issue resolution 17
Recognize the issues 15
W
Workshops, to assure deployment readiness 57

222
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment

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250 <-> 459 pages
Value Realization from Efficient Software Deployment



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SG24-7934-00 ISBN 0738435813
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Value Realization from
Efficient Software
Deployment
Value realization
Methods, tools, and
assets
Best practices
Many companies have a complex process for purchasing
software that is required by IT projects, or better, by the
business. Usually software is purchased by a centralized
procurement function, and is either purchased on a
project-by-project basis or as a large periodic software
contract.
Unfortunately purchasing software products does not
automatically mean that these products are exploited
throughout the organization providing the maximum possible
value to the business units. Several issues call for a
structured approach that gets the most business value out of
software already purchased. The objectives of this approach
are to:
Create maximum awareness throughout the organization
of the software purchased.
Track software use in IT projects and act if products are
not used at all, used improperly, or insufficiently used.
Facilitate use of software products in projects, especially
when software products are complex and require a lot of
integration.
We can summarize the overall objective of this approach as
ensuring that the business units in an organization obtain the
maximum possible value of software products purchased,
which is also the scope of this IBM Redbooks publication.
Back cover
First page image
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